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WEST VIRGINIA 
UNIVERSITY 



VOL.12 




PUBLISHED BY 
* JUNIOR CLASS 






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■ DITORIAL 




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Everyone who reads this volume will know what it means 
We have given it all of the time and energy that school work would 
allow. We have enjoyed doing the work that it represents but we 
shall enjoy still more the words of commendation, if any that may 
come to our ears concerning our efforts. It is with pride that we 
present this book to its readers, for we have done our best. Further- 
more, everything on these pages was produced by students of the 
University or some who have formerly been connected with the insti 
tution. No outside aid was called for as we desired to make the 
book purely representative of our school; so we ask you to be lenient 
in your criticisms of the discrepancies which we know to exist in 
our work. 

We are glad to take this opportunity to thank most sincerely 
those of our old friends who have had the kindness to assist us — T 
W. Moore, "Energy" Mason, Netta B. Lazzelle, W. W. Trent and 
Van McCreery. 

We are grateful also to those members of the faculty who of 
fered us their valuable advice :— John Harrington Cox, our censor 
Robert Allen Armstrong, Charles Henry Patterson and William 
Jackson Leonard. 




LIBRARY 
WEST'VIRGINIA UNIVEP6ITY 




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Thomas Edward Hodges was born on December 13, 
1858, in the part of Old Virginia that later became Upshur 
County of West Virginia. His parents were both Vir- 
ginians. 

Amid the simple, rural surroundings of early southern 
life he lived until entering college, attending the common 
schools of the community and receiving also some private 
instruction. He obtained his preparatory work "and also 
Presbyterianism", as he expressed it, at the French Creek 
Academy, an unpretentious institution of private owner- 
ship. After completing the course of study at this school, 
he taught two terms in the rural schools of Upshur County, 
although he was but a lad. 

In 1877 he entered West Virginia University as a 
freshman, and received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
1881. The degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon 
him in 1884. In the fall of 1881 he entered upon his long 
educational career, as principal of the Morgantown Public 
School. He held this position for five years. 1 11 1886 he 
was called to the principalship of Marshall College, Hun- 
tington, the State Normal School, where he remained for 
ten vears. In 1896 he became professor of physics in his 



Alma Mater, which position he has held with distinguished 
success to the present time. But His services to the Uni- 
versity have been confined by no means to his work in the 
chair of physics : he has been, for a term of years. Chairman 
of the Committee on Classification and Grades, whose work 
is most important as well as most arduous. His duties in 
this position have been those that should give him the title 
of Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. In the per- 
formance of these duties he has shown rare tact and exe- 
cutive ability; and his work has been based on a wide and 
accurate knowledge of college practices and standards and 
has been influenced by the sanest and best college ideals. 
As a member of the Athletic Committee he has been 
brought in closest contact with an element in college life 
that is too often the cause of friction between the student 
body and the college authorities. With remarkable tact 
and fairness he has always stood as the arbiter of any con- 
flict between the requirements of the one and the righ! 
the other. 

In another educational field lie has been active and in- 
fluential. For more than twenty year- he ha- conducted 
and lectured before scores of teachers' institutes in West 



13 



Virginia, and has joined the State Superintendent of Schools 
in a number of educational speaking campaigns. 

Besides his work in the educational field which is ines- 
timable. Professor I lodges has been active also in religious, 
civic, business and military affairs. He united with the 
Presbyterian Church at French Creek in 1876 and has since 
been constantly active in furthering the interests of his 
church. While at Huntington he was made a ruling elder, 
lie was chosen for the same office when he came to Mor- 
gantown. At present he is a member of the College Board 
of the church and of the Special Committee on Religious 
Education of the Presbyterian General Assembly of the 
United States, both of which positions have national scope. 

Professor I lodges' political activity, after we pass the 
fact that he wishes to be known as a solid Democrat, has 
been infrequent but important. At the State Convention 
in Parkersburg in 1892 he was named for State Superin- 
tendent of Schools, but did not receive the nomination. He 
was placed before the people very prominently in the past 
year when lie was urged to run for the nomination for 
Governor. Feeling was very strong for him at the Char- 
leston Convention but he was defeated. One of the lead- 
ing dailies of the state said of him, "should Colonel I lodges 
desire the nomination four years hence, it would be handed 
him on a silver platter." His sincerity and ardor in respect 
to the welfare of the state, which were firmly established 
in his conduct during the campaign, were recognized by 
the new Governor, Wm. F. Glasscock, when he was 
appointed to the State Hoard of Control for a term of four 
years. This is distinctly a rase of the office seeking the 



man. Colonel Hodges was appointed because of his emi- 
nent fitness for the place and not because he sought it or 
his friends asked for it. 

In his earlier years Professor Hodges was an active 
member of the 2nd Regiment of the West Virginia National 
Guard Co. I. He enlisted in 1889 and after successive pro- 
motions was made colonel of his regiment in 1893. He 
resigned from active work to come to the University. 

Professor Hodges has been very successful in business. 
He is president of the Bank of Morgantown and secre- 
tary of a leading building and loan association of the same 
city. 

Mrs. Hodges' maiden name was Mary A. Hayes, 
daughter of Mr. Hayes of Morgantown. They have two 
children. Professor Hodges has long been affiliated with 
the Knappa Alpha Fraternity (Southern) and takes an 
active interest in the society. 

In connection with the University, Professor Hodges 
has done a great work. He is loved by everyone who has 
come into contact with his warm heart and vigorous mind. 
Only those know him best who have come under his kind- 
ly care. He is strict and exacting in his dealings with 
students, but with him justice is always tempered with 
mercy, and it is always recognized that the permanent 
good of the students is his final aim. The sons and 
daughters of West Virginia are made to love their moun- 
tain home all the more through the knowledge that the 
state has the support of so loyal and sturdy a citizen as 
Professor Hodges. "Tommy" has always been looked up 
to by the student as a father who has a constant eye of 



14 



watchfulness and a guiding hand along the path of learn- 
ing. Those who have known Professor I lodges as the head 
of his Bible class in the Presbyterian Church have seen one 
of the noblest sides of this big man. Here his keen intellect 
gives a strong and admirable interpretation to that Word 
which he strives earnestly to follow in his daily life. 

It is with a deep regret and the sense of a great loss 



that the student body learns of Professor Hodges' immi- 
nent departure. But we are reconciled to the loss when 
we reflect that he will be able to benefit the en more 

in his new work, and are heartily glad of his good fortune. 
We wish him all the blessings that may come to a gj 
man, and that which has always been his heart"^ desire — 
A field for the best usefulm 



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15 



DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON 
HARRY ANTHONY EATON 
ALFRED JARRETT HARE 
ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL 
WAITMAN T. BARBE 



POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS 
CHARLES EDGAR HOGG 
THOMAS CLARK ATKESON 
FREDERICK WILSON TRUSCOTT 
WILL HAGEN BOUGHTON 



ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG 



16 





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pa rd of Regents 





For the Term beginning May 19, 1905. 
C. E. HAWORTH, Huntington, W. Va. *L. J. WILLIAMS, Lewisburg, W. Va. 

E. M. GRANT, Morgantown, W. Va. D. C. GALLAHER, Charleston, W. Va. 

T. P. JACOBS, New Martinsville, W. Va. 
For the Term beginning May, 19, 1907. 
*J. R. TROTTER, Morgantown, W. Va. J. B. FINLEY, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

F. P. McNeil, Wheeling, W. Va. C. M. BABB, Falls, W. Va. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

C. M. BABB President 

J. S. STEWART Secretary 

A. R. WHITEHILL Treasurer 

T. E. HODGES Assistant Treasurer 

W. J. WHITE Auditor 

F. L. EMORY Supt. of Buildings and Grounds 

^Resigned. 



18 



DANIEL BO ARDM AN PURINTON, Ph. D., L. L. D., . . President 

POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS, D. D., Chaplain 

WAITMAN T. BARBE, Litt. D., Assistant to the President and Field Agent. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, Dean of Women. 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A. M., Registrar. 

ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL, Ph. D., Treasurer. 

THOMAS EDWARD HODGES, A. M., Assistant Treasurer. 

WILLIAM J. WHITE, Auditor. 

FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY, M. E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 



19 



A L E N D A 



1908 

Tunc 22. Monda) Summer School Begins 

July Ji, Frida> Summer School Ends 

September 21, Monday Fall Quarter Begins 

September 21, 22, 23, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 

Entrance Examinations 

September 21, 22, 23, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 

Matriculation and Registration of Students 

September 23, Wednesday. 8:30 P. M. . . .Fall Convocation 
September, 24. Thursday Recitations of Fall Quarter Begin 

November 26, to November 29 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 15, Tuesday. . .Last Recitations of Fall Quarter 
December 16, Wednesday, to December 18, Friday, inclusive 

Final Examinations of Fall Quarter 

December 19, Saturday, to January 3. 1909 Quarterly Recess 



1909 

January 4. Monday ( Registration Day) 

Winter Quarter Begins 

January 4, Monday, 8 P. M Winter Convocation 

January 5, Tuesday .. Recitations of Winter Quarter Begin 
February 22, Monday. .Washington's Birthday, a Holiday 
March 23, Tuesday. . . .Last Recitations of Winter Quarter 
March 24. Wednesday, to March 26, Friday 

Final Examinations of Winter Quarter 

March 26, Friday Winter Quarter Ends 

March 27, Saturday, to March 29, Monday Quarterly Recess 
March 30, Tuesday (Registration Day) 

Spring Quarter Begins 

March 30, Tuesday, 8 P. M Spring Convocation 

March 31, Wednesday. .Recitations of Spring Quarter Begin 

May 30, Saturday Memorial Day, a Holiday 

June 8, Tuesday Last Recitations of Spring Quarter 

June 9, Wednesday, to June 12, Saturday, inclusive. . . . 

Final Examinations of Spring Quarter 

lune 16, Wednesdav • Commencement 




20 



'rogramnra for Iiimh 



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130 P. M. Thursday, June 10 Inter-Society Debate 

130 P. M. Friday, June 11, Moot Court 

130 P. M. Saturday, June 12, Inter-Society Contest 

:oo A. M. Sunday, June 13, Baccalaureate Sermon 

130 P. M. Sunday, June 13, 

Sermon before University Christian Associations 

:oo P. M. Monday, June 14, 

Competitive Drill, Cadet Corps 

130 P. M. Monday, June 14, 

Faculty Concert : School of Music 

:oo A. M. Tuesday, June 15, Competition for Corps Colors 

130 to 5 :oo P. M 

. . . .Annual Exhibition of the Department of Fine Arts 

130 P. M. Tuesday, June 15, Alumni Address. 

:oo A. M. Wednesday, June 16 Commencement 



21 







Professor Douthat was born April thirteenth 1840, in 
Christiansburg, Virginia. He was prepared for college at 
the academy in his native town, but before he could quite 
complete his college course the civil war broke out; and 
his sense of duty called him to defend the land of his b'rth. 
Four years he fought bravely and won distinction as a sol- 
dier. Throughout the struggle he was captain of Com- 
pany K, Eleventh Virginia Infantry in Pickett's Division 
of Longstreet's Corps. Unflinchingly he led his company 
in Pickett's valiant charge at Gettysburg; and was one of 
the few captains who escaped with their lives. When the 
end of the war came he laid down his arms and began to fit 
a useful citizen in a united nation. 

Soon after the war he began to teach, and after nine 
years work in the schools, Emory and Henry College, his 
Alma Mater, conferred on him the masters degree in 1874. 
Three years later he received his doctor's degree from 
Roanoke College. In the meantime he had been elected 
professor of Language in Missouri University School of 
.Mines and Metallurgy, where he remained until 1884. Since 
thai date he has held the following positions: President 
Collegiate Institute, New Mexico. [884 (887; President 
Collegiate fnstitute, Arkansas. [887-1889; Professor of Lan- 
and Chaplain, Kentucky Military Institute, [889- 



1890; President Barboursville College 1890-1895. In 1895 
he was elected professor of Latin and Greek in West Vir- 
ginia University, and two years later professor of the Latin 
Language and Literature. Since that time he has dis- 
tinguished himself as a teacher and a writer. In 1907 he 
was rendered emeritus by the P>oard of Regents and retired 
on a sufficient salary. 

Throughout his career as a teacher, Professor Douthat 
has been devoted to Latin, and by his research work has 
thrown much light upon it. He has made a special study of 
all the Romance Languages and has given a connected view 
of them by associating them with the Aryan tongues, thir- 
ty or fourth in number. As a result of his study he has 
written three books: "Standards as Exhibited by the Aryan 
Tongues," "Book of Latin Synonyms," and "Natural His- 
tory of Languages." The first two books have been pub- 
lished and the third will soon appear in print. I le has also 
written many pamphlets on Language and Philosophy. 

In addition to these valuable contributions to Litera- 
ture Professor Douthat has won considerable fame as a 
philosopher and lecturer. His philosophical charts set 
forth. "The Possibilities of the Human Will." The Meaning 
of Life," and "The Origin of Motion." His most famous 
lecture is on the battle of Gettysburg, in which he was an 
active participant. In this lecture there are several poems 
descriptive of that giant struggle. 

Professor Douthat's life has been full of hard work and 



22 



faithful service. He tells us of one period in his work when 
he taught seven Languages every day for a year, having 
eighty five classes each week ; and of another experience 
when he was in his class-room every day but one for fifty- 
eight months. 

In all the difficulties of life he has faced its problems as 



he faced tbe enemy in battle, fearlessly and courageously. 
His work and success in life cannot be expressed more 
appropriately than by two lines which appear in on* 
his poems on Gettysburg: 

"Ne'er troops to such a test were put," 
Xor men behaved more gallantly." 



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23 



Although Mrs. Moore has never been ateacher in West 
Virginia University, we feel that recognition is due her 
because of her former work in the old Woodburn Seminary 
and her connection with the Monongalia Academy, the two 
schools which were united to form the West Virginia 
Agricultural College out of which the present University 
has grown. 

Elizabeth Irwin Moore was born in Wheeling, Vir- 
ginia, now West Virginia. She received her education at 
a private institution for girls which was conducted by the 
Reverend William Wallace and his wife. The school, one 
< f the best in those days, offered a thorough course in 
English and Mathematics. Later on this school was merg- 
ed into the Wheeling Female Seminary. 

After Mrs. Moore completed her work in this school 
she taught a private class for girls. She taught, also, very 
successfully in the Washington School at Wheeling under 
the principalship of the Reverend D. W. Talford. 

In [853 Elizabeth Irwin Moore was married to the 
Reverend J. R. Moore who was then the Principal of the 
Monongalia Academy at Morgantown. When Woodburn 
Seminary was established in [858 for girls Mrs. Moore was 
one of ils first teachers and continued in this work until in 
[867 when the Seminary and Academy were united to form 
the West Virginia Agricultural College. 

' U 

WESTV1RGI 



Mrs. Moore*s work in the Seminary was of an emi- 
nently successful character. Her husband was the super- 
intendent of both schools and Mr. and Mrs. Moore working 
together raised the two schools to such a standard that their 
worth and importance were recognized all over the country. 
It was due to this wide reputation that the Agricultural 
College was established, at Morgantown, called the "Athens 
of West Virginia." 

When Woodburn Seminary was closed to the girls who 
had found a school home within its walls, Mrs. Moore be- 
came a teacher in the Morgantown Collegiate Institute 
which was then situated at the corner of Foundry and Front 
Street. Both at Woodburn Seminary and at the Collegiate 
Institute Mrs. Moore taught Mental Philosophy and Ma- 
thematics in which two subjects she was at her best. Her 
husband, a man of wide knowledge considered that she was 
one of the best teachers of Mathematics he had ever known. 
After two vears of work in the Institute Mrs. Moore her- 
self became the owner of it and conducted a school there 
for girls until 1889 when the building was burned, just when 
the West Virginia University was opening its doors to 
young women. Since i88g Mrs. Moore has lived with her 
daughter at Mount Holyoke College, at Dennison Univer- 
sity, and now at West Virginia University. 

Mrs. Moore is a charming woman with the sweet face 

24 

BRARY 

N!A UNIVERSITY 



and gentle manners of the old school when the girls were 
carefully guarded from the boisterous touch of the outside 
world. Her mind is as vigorous and as strong as when she 
taught in the old Woodburn Seminary. Her life as a teach- 
er, a wife and a mother has been a full and successful one 
and she rests content in the consciousness of a life well 



spent. Mrs. Moore has never lost her interest in the Wood- 
burn Seminary, although its name and identity have ' 
lost in the University, and she gladly recall- the pleasant 
life when the old Seminary stood where Woodburn Hall 
now stands. 



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26 




Israel Charles White 




Every school boy will tell you that C. Columbus dis- 
covered America October 12th, 1492, at 4 o'clock in the 
morning — and every school boy will be wrong. C. Colum- 
bus merely came over and located a few islands off the 
coast of Florida, stole a few of the natives and paddled back 
across the xAtlantic. It remained for America to be dis- 
covered by explorers, adventurers, settlers, scientists, nat- 
uralists, geographers and geologists. 

Speaking of geologists, that reminds me : Dr. Israel 
Charles White, geologist of the state of West Virginia since 
1897 has had a finger in the pie as a discover. He was the 
first to discover the presence of Permian fossil plants in 
the Appalachain field ; first to discover the secondary origin 
of many iron ores by the disolution and replacement of lime- 
stones through the circulatory ground waters ; first to dis- 
cover and announce a glacial period in Brazil. So you see 
the school boys are all wrong— dead wrong, for C. Colum- 
bus knew nothing about such things as fossil plants, sec- 
ondary origin or glacial periods. 

Israel Charles White was born in Monongalia county, 
West Virginia, November 1st, 1848. When a mere youth 
he had two ambitions in life. The first was to be a geolo- 



gist ; the second was to be a good geologist. To the intent 
that these happy ambitions might be the more easily real- 
ized he studied at the West Virginia University and re- 
ceived the A. B. degree in 1872; A. M. 1875; Ph. 1)., Uni- 
versity of Arkansas; graduate course at Columbia 1876-7. 
So you see what steps must be taken in order to be a good 
geologist. And how easy it seems, and is — if one has the 
brains. Doctor White went along industriously, learning 
all about the inside of the earth, classifying, analyzing, 
living through the various ages of the past until now. it is 
said, he can speak the language of the Paleozoic or the 
Stone Age with ease and rapidity. From 1877 to 1892, 
fifteen weary years, he was professor of geology in the West 
Virginia University, teaching all about strata, and . 
and periods and fossils — and he didn't fossilize. The reason 
for this is doubtless because he did not settle down into the 
quiet and easy enjoyment that comes with teaching [our 
classes in the University each day. Not he! He was out 
climbing over the mountains of Pennsylvania deciphering 
first hand the lien tracks left carelessly in the mud of past 
ages. From 1875 to 1884 he was assistant geologist of the 
second geological survey of Pennsylvania, and the author 



27 



of eight reports on the same. It was at this time that he 
discovered the first Permean fossils in the Appalachain 
field and is the joint author with Professor Fontaine of 
their description in those reports. From 1884 to 1888 was 
assistant geologist of the United States Geological Survey 
and is the author of Bulletin 65 on the stratigraphy of the 
Northern Appalachain coal field. 

In 1892 Dr. White resigned his chair in the University 
to take charge of a petroleum business which he had devel- 
oped in demonstrating the truth of the "anti-clinical theory" 
of the occurence of oil and gas deposits which he redis- 
covered in [883 and was the first to put to practical use in 
the field. 

Dr. White spent two years, 1904-6, in Brazil as chief of 
the Brazilian Coal Commission. The report of his dis- 
coveries during this little outing is contained in two volum- 
es of 017 pages with 13 plates many of which are new, and 
a new Mesosaurus, all nearly related to Permean forms in 
South Africa, India and Australia a report as voluminous 
and exhaustive as any T. Roosevelt ever sent to a long- 
suffering congress in his balmiest days. 



In May 1908 Dr. White was invited by President 
Roosevelt to deliver an address before the conference of 
Governors at the White House. As second speaker on the 
program after the President he read a paper on "The Waste 
of our Natural Resources." 

Dr. White was treasurer of the Geological Society of 
America from 1892 to 1907; Vice-President of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, Sec. E., 1896-7 ; 
delegate to the International Geological Conference at St. 
Petersburg, 1897 and at Paris in 1900. 

Dr. White lives in Morgantown, West Virginia. Fel- 
low American Association for the Advancement of Science 
Fellow American Philosophical Society; Fellow Geological 
Society of America ; American Geographical Society ; Geo- 
logical Society of Washington; and Washington Academy 
of Science; Honorary Member of the Appalachain Engi- 
neering Association and Life Member of the American Min- 
ing Congress. His published works are: "Petroleum and 
Natural Gas" 2 volumes; "Coal Fields" 2 volumes; Geo- 
graphical maps of West Virginia; "The Coal and Asso- 
ciated Rocks of South Brazil" 2 volumes. 



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28 





First Bug — Stranger! What ails yon "Red and 
Black" Bear? 

Second Bug — He's just trying to regain his eye- 
sight since the West Virginia nine wal 
loped him the fourth successive time 



29 




\ 



Melville Davisson Post \ 



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McKillc Davisson Post is one of the few who, when 
they were students at the West Virginia University could 
give the English instructors all of the face cards and beat 
them at their own game. He traveled the long familiar 
path without fear and found time to write stories and 
plays — which he presently destroyed. Mr. Post was born 
in Harrison county, West Virginia, April 19th, 1870. He 
spent his youth on the cattle ranches of his father, thus 
imitating another noted statesman, only in the case of the 
other statesman the ranches were not his father's. This 
first hand acquaintance with nature is drawn upon largely 
in "Dwellers of the 1 1 ills." which he published in 1900. 
He received the degree of A. I!, from West Virginia Uni- 
versity in [892 and the L,L. B. degree from the same insti- 
tution in [893. While in college he won the honors for 
declamation, oration and debate. 

Mr. Post is a Democrat. By an unfortunate chain of 
circumstances he arrived in the political Held a few years too 
late. When he departed from the halls of old W. V. U., 
Democrats had already gone OUt of fashion in the state. 
Although he had the power of sweet speech even as the 
'Peerle-ss Prattler of the Platte' it could win for him onh 



the honor of presenting the name of a leading candidate 
for Governor to the Democratic State Convention at Park- 
ersburg in 1894; and also the election of Presidential Elec- 
tor-at-Large, and he sat in the Electoral College as the 
youngest member ever chosen to that body. 

Mr. Post formed a law partnership with H< n. John A. 
Howard in Wheeling in the autumn of 1894 and this part- 
nership lasted for six years. His practice during this time 
was largely in the criminal courts and he tried almost every 
sort of case known to criminal jurisprudence. This dip 
into crime resulted in the conception of ' 'Randolph Mas- 
on' — a curious legal misanthrope, who thought all wrongs, 
including murder, could be so planned that under the law 
they would not be crimes." Since lynch law and the "un- 
written law" are being so otter involved in late years it 
would be apropos to leave out the words "including mur- 
der". Mr. Post prepared a series of short stories each 
illustrating a crime which turned on this unique character, 
and he published the volume under the title, "The Strange 
Schemes of Randolph Mason." The author delves deep 
into peculiar crimes and clothes his thoughts in only such 
English as can be acquired by grinding through many 



30 



courses in that study at the West Virginia University. The 
book was submitted to Putman's. in New York and at once 
accepted by them. It immediately won wide notice and 
has continued one of the strongest and best selling books 
in America, having recently gone into its twelfth edition. 
Having exhausted criminal procedure in all of its 
phases, Mr. Post next turned his attention to the field of 
corporate law. In 1900 he formed a law partnership with 
Hon. John T. McGraw at Grafton, West Virginia. This 
firm was one of the strongest in the state and during the 
five years which it lasted it was on one side or the other 
of every important case in the Northern District of West 
Virginia. At the end of this time Mr. Post's health failed 
him and he was compelled to go abroad. He spent some 
time at Bides le Bains in the South of France and he also 



visited England. In 1900 he had published "Dwellers 
the Hills" and this hook was very well received both in 
this country and in England; and during his visit t<> the 
latter country the sentiment existing there found apprecia- 
tive expression in many social attentions. 

.Mr. l'ost searched deep into the Foundations of cor- 
porate law and took "Randolph Mason" through another 
series of cases each bearing upon some peculiar phase of 
that branch of jurisprudence. This series is called. "The 
Corrector of Destinies." and the serial rights sold for the 
highest price ever paid in this country for current fiction. 
He is also the outhor of "The Man of the Last Resort" 
which deals in Legal Problems. 

Mr. Post lives in Clarksburg, West Virginia. He has 
never regained his health and does little practicing. 




31 




Naoy MoGee Waters 



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The fairies met in a cottage in a little Preston county 
hamlet one night to endow a chubby babe as he lay sleep- 
ing in his cradles. Each fairy in her turn bent over the 
babe and this is what each one said: 

"I will give him a strong physique." 

"I will imbue his heart with great sympathy." 

"I will make him a leader of men and he shall read and 
understand his fellows." 

"I will endow his mind with power to analyze great 
thoughts and to solve the intricate problems that confront 
the mortals of his age." 

"Speech that shall be as mellow as old wine and as 
simple as that of a little child and as pleasant to the ear 
as the sound of silver bells at eventide shall be my gift to 
him. 

"Enough", said the queen of the fairies: "It is not meet 
thai one mortal should have all our gifts. This is my gift 
to him : all the gifts you have given him he shall use to help 
mankind. I will endow him with the love of God and his 
mission shall be to teach mankind the ways of righteous 
and truth. His life shall be beautiful and he shall be a 
blessing to the sons of men. Ili^ life shall be a bright star 
that shall be to guide the shipwrecked mariners on the sea 



of time." 

The fairies vanished. 

********* 

Nacy McGee Waters, a farmer lad ; then a college 
graduate ; then a teacher ; then a minister and lecturer of 
wide reputation ; finally the pastor of the largest Protestant 
church in New York City. Verily the work of the fairies 
was good. 

Nacy McGee Waters was born in Independence, Pres- 
ton county, West Virginia November second, 1866. He 
grew up on a farm and prepared for college under private 
teachers. He graduated from the West Virginia Uni- 
versity at nineteen years of age with high honors in ora- 
tory. Upon graduation he was elected superintendent of 
the city schools of Morgantown, West Virginia, which 
position he held for two years. At the age of twenty-one 
he entered Boston University. In 1891 he received from 
that University the degree of S. T. B., having in addition 
done special work in philosophy, and filled the pulpit of 
the West Church, Taunton. At the age of twenty-four 
he became the pastor of St. Luke's Methodists Episcopal 
church, Dubuque, Iowa. After four year's of service there 
he was called to be pastor of Kmmanual church, Evanston, 



32 



Illinois. His fame as a lecturer and minister at that time 
brought him invitations in many directions to important 
methodist pulpits. But while studying in New England 
he was attracted by the democratic policy of Congregation- 
alism. So, when in the fall of 1899 he received a call to 
the first Congregational church of Binghamton, N. Y., he 
accepted. In 1901 he received the degree of D. D. from 
Syracuse University. Near the close of 1902 he was unan- 
imously called to the Tompkins Avenue Congregational 
church in Brooklyn, N. Y. This is the largest Congrega- 
tional church in the world and the largest Protestant church 
in New York City. When Dr. Waters became pastor of 
that church it had a membership of 2,200 souls. At the 
end of his fifth year as pastor the membership was about 
3,000. There are 3,000 children enrolled in Bible classes. 
Dr. Waters is a born leader of men ; he has to be, the 
fairies made it so. It is a common remark that his con- 
gregations are made up largely of men ; this is the work of 



the fairies, tor they gave him the power to understand and 
read the hearts of men. His power as a lecturer and 
preacher lays in his ability to illustrate great subjects with 
the utmost simplicity — the fairies again. 

Dr. Waters is one of the few really great lyceum 
lecturers on the American platform today. Born in the 
South and educated in the South and in New England, he 
began his career in the West. In appearance and nature 
he is essentially Southern. He is good to look at, genial t" 
meet, fascinating to listen to and he never fails to please. 
Among his best known themes are "A Worshipper at New 
England Shrines," "Daniel Webster," "The Lost Demo- 
crat," "Hamlet," "Faust," "The Ring and the Book." His 
published volumes are: "The Religious Life;" "The Young 
Man's Religion;" "Heroes and Heroism in Common Life." 
He was married August 24, 1892, to Katherine Brown, 
daughter of Captain Henry H. Pierce, U. S. A. 




33 



•IV: A ■" •'* 



v^^T 














34 



V — 



/ 
\ 



Standing Committals 



v_ 



■^2d 



AND 
FACULTY 



C^= 



•-71 

s 



J 



DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, Ph. D., LL. D President and Professor of Philosophy. 

JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B. S., M. S Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus. 

ROBERT WILLIAM DOUTHAT, A. M., Ph. D.. . . Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Emeritus. 

ST. GEORGE TUCKER BROOKE, A. M., LL. D Professor of Common and Statute Law. 

WILLIAM P. WILLEY, A. B., A. M Professor of Equity, Jurisprudence, and Commercial Law. 

POWELL BENTON REYNOLDS, A. M., D. D Chaplain and Professor of Economics and Sociology. 

ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL, A. M., Ph. D Professor of Chemistry. 

THOMAS CLARK ATKESON, M. S., Ph. D. Dean of the College of Agriculture and Professor of Agriculture. 

FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY, M. M. E., M. E Professor of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics. 

-SAMUEL B. BROWN, A. B., A. M Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A. B., A. M 

Professor of English Language and Literature and Head of the Department of English. 

BERT HOLMES HITE, M. S 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Vice-Director and Chemist of the West Virginia Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

THOMAS EDWARD HODGES, A. B., A. M Professor of Physics. 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A. B., A. M 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature and Principal of the Preparator) School. 

CHARLES HENRY PATTERSON, A. B., A. M Professor of Rhetoric. 

FREDERICK WILSON TRUSCOTT, A. M., Ph. D Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures. 

HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN, A. B., LL. D Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

35 



CLEMENT ROSS JONES, B. S. C. E., M. M. E Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

WILL HAZEN BROUGHTON, B. S. C. E., C. E Professor Civil Engineering. 

RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS, B. S. C. E., C. E Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, A. M., Ph. D Professor of Education. 

JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, A. M., Ph. D Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE Dean of Women and Instructor on the Piano. 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, A. M., Ph. D Professor of History and Political Science. 

ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ, A. B Director of Physical Training 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, A. B., M. D 

Professor of Anatomy and Physiology and Head of the Medical Faculty at Morgantown. 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX, Ph. B., A. M Professor of English Philology. 

ROSS SPENCE Director of the School of Music and Instructor on Stringed Instruments. 

CHARLES EDGAR HOGG, LL. D 

Dean of the College of Law and Professor of Constitutional and International Law. 

FREDERICK LAWRENCE KORTRIGHT, B. S., D. Sc Professor of Chemistry. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A. B., A. M Professor of Latin. 

HARRY ANTHONY EATON, A. B., LL. B 

Captain U. S. Army, Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and Commandant of Cadets. 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph. B., Ph. D. Professor of Mathematics. 

JUSTIN FRANK GRANT, Ph. B., M. D Professor of Anatomy and Pathology. 

HENRY MACE PAYNE, Ph. D., Sc. D Professor of Mining Engineering. 

ALBERT MOORE REESE, A. B., Ph. D Professor of Zoology. 

OLIVER PERRY CHITWOOD, A. B., Ph. D Professor of European History. 

WAITMAN BARBE, A. M., Litt. D 

Assistant to the President and Associate Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

WILLIAM JACKSON LEONARD, Assoiate Professor and Head of the Department of Fine Arts. 

C. EDMUND NEIL, A. B Associate Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 

EDWIN FAYETTE CHURCH, Jr. B. S ^Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

36 



WILLIAM ELMORE DICKINSON, A. B., M. E., E. E Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

DANIEL WEBSTER WORKING, B. S., A. M., Superintendent of Agricultural Extension Work. 

CHARLES COLLIER HOLDEN, A. B Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

SIMEON CONANT SMITH, A. B., A. M 

Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Instructor in English in the Preparatory School. 

MADISON STATHERS, A. B., Ph. D Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

ARETAS WILBUR NOLAN, A. B. . .Assistant Professor of Forestry, Horticulture, and Economic Entomology. 

GEORGE PERRY GRIMSLEY, A. M., Ph. D Special Lecturer in Economic Geology. 

DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS, A. B., LL. B Principal of the Commercial School. 

EVA EMMA HUBBARD Instructor in Drawing and Painting. 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B. M Instructor on the Piano and Pipe Organ. 

RUDOLF WERTIME Instructor on the Piano. 

WALTON KIRK BRAINERD, B. S Instructor in Dairying. 

WILLIAM MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER, A. B Instructor in German 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A. B., A. M Instructor in English. 

EDWARD RICHTER, LL. D Instructor in Vocal Music. 

FREDERICK RANDOM WHIPPLE, M. D. V Instructor in Veterinary Science 

CLARENCE POST, A. B Instructor in Physics. 

JONES ABRAHAM STEWART, B. S. M. E Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

MABEL CONSTANCE FOSTER Assistant in Piano. 

*DRUSILLA VICTORIA JOHNSON, A. B., A. M Assistant in Greek and Mathematics. 

LOUISE FERRIS CHEZ Assistant Director of Physical Training, in charge of the Woman's Gymnasium. 

MARGARET BUCHANAN, A. B Assistant in Greek and Mathematics. 

RUFUS A. WEST Assistant in Metal Working and Stationary Engineer. 

THOMAS EDWARD CATHER Foreman of the Machine Shop. 

W. A. MESTREZAT Assistant in Music (Wind Instruments.) 

JOHN B. GRUMBEIN Foreman of the Wood Shop. 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING Secretary to the President. 

FRANCIS J. McCONNELL, S. T. B., Ph. D. Pastor New York Avenue M. E. Church Brooklyn, N. Y. 

37 



£T 




# -^%r*W!?"^ ®~ 











Senior Of ffi©s« 

J. W. HALL President. 

SAKIN ROBERTS Vice President. 

ADA M. NEAL Secretary. 

LLOYD BACKMAN Treasurer. 

MABEL STOUT Historian. 

39 




HUGH C. BARNES, B. S. M. E. 
Theta Psi 

Cadet Captain Co. B ; Distinguished 
Cadet; Class Historian (2). 



ARTHUR M. LUCAS, B. S. C. E. 
Sigma Nu 

Engineering Society; Y. M. C. A.; 
Columbian. Glee Club' (2) (3) ; Mon- 
ticola Board (3). 





ADA MAY NEAL, A. B. 
Chi Omega 

English Club ; Beowulf Gedryht ; 
Woman's League ; Y. W. C. A. ; Pan-Hell- 
enic Association. 

I lead nf Beowulf Gedryht; Execu- 
tive Committee of Woman's League; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee: Secretary Senior 
Class. 

FRENCH McGRAY, LL. B. 

Sphinx; Southern Club. Varsity 
Foot Ball Team '08; Gymnastic team '09; 
Assistant to Physical Director '08- '09. 

40 





LORENA MABEL LEE FRIES, A. B. 
Chi Omega 
Woman's League ; Y. W. C. A. ; Eng- 
ish Club ; Beowulf Gedryht ; Pan-Hellenic 
Association; Columbian Literary Society ; 
'*V. V." Club. Class Secretary ( i ) ; Class 
Vice President (2) ; Assistant Editor-in- 
Chief Monticola (3) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(3); Assistant Editor-in-Chief Mononga- 
(4); Micel Scop Beowulf Gedryht 
Treasurer Pan Hellenic Association 



nan 

(4) 
(4). 



JOHN P. McJILTON, B. S. M. E. 

Engineering Society; Y. M. C. A.; 
Masonic Club; French Club. Distinguish- 
ed Cadet three years. 





J. FRANCIS SHREVE, A. B. 

Columbian; Beowulf Gedryht; West 

Virginia Wesleyan Club. Vice-President 
Columbian Society '07: Critic '08; llonl 
Weard of Beowulf Gedryht '08-09. 



FLORENCE JACKSON, A. B. 

English Club; Beowulf Gedryht; 
Parthenon; Y. W. C. A.; Woman's 
League; V. V. Club. Essayist, Parthe- 
non; Literary Society (4); Secretary Y. 
W. C. A.; President Woman's League; 
Secretary Athletic Association ; Critic, 
Parthenon; Monticola Board; Athenaeum 
Board. 




41 




JAMES WILSON FERRELL, B. S. 
Delta Tau Delta 

Y. M. C. A.; Chemical Society. Pres. 
Chemical Society (4) ; Class basket ball 
team (3, 4). 



LAKIN F. ROBERTS, A. B. 

Phi Kappa Sigma 

Vice President Senior Class. 





HUBERT EARL SNYDER, B. S. C. E. 
Delta Tau Delta 

Sphinx. Capt. Class Base Ball Team 
( 1 ) ; Assistant Manager Foot Ball (3) ; 
Chairman Junior Prom Committee (3); 
Manager Foot Ball (4). 



ARCH C. WEAVER, B. S. 
Kappa Psi 
Secretary of W. V. U. Scientific So- 
ciety (if Medicine; Captain Cadet Corps; 
1st Assistant Manager Basket Ball; Cap- 
tain and Manager Class Basket Ball; 
Secretary of Sophomore Medical Class; 
Captain of Class Track Team; Delegate 
National Convention Kappa Psi, Char- 
leston, S. C. ; Cadet Officers Medal for 
Drill and Discipline. 

42 





L. P. HOLLOWAY, B. S. M. E. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Engineering Society; Manager Sen- 
inn Basket BalfTeam. 



BENJAMIN WALTER KING, A. B. 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

"Sphinx"; Assistant Football Man- 
ager '06-07 ; Associate Editor Athenaeum 
'o6-'o7; Editor-in-Chief Athenaeum '07- 
'08. 





ADA MOON, A. B. 

Alpha Xi Delta 

English Club; Bewulf Gedryht ; Y. 
W C. A. ; Woman's League. Secretary 

of Class (2) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4) ; Se 
For Sittend, Beowulf Gedryht. 



THOS. W. FITZGERALD, B. S. M. E. 

Engineering Society; Y. M. C. A.; 
Mandolin Club '07. Vice President Class 

(3). 

43 





LLOYD SUTTON BACKMAN, 
B. S. C. E. 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
.Mountain Football team '04, '07, '08; 
Second baseball team '04, '07; Captain- 
elect second base ball team '08; Class bas- 
ket ball team '09 ; Treasurer Senior Class ; 
Vice President W. V. A. A.; Track team 



OS- 



MABEL STOUT, A. B. 

English Club ; Beowulf Gedryht ; Y. 
\Y. C. A. ; Woman's League ; Columbian. 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3) and (4) ; Ex- 
ecutive Hoard Woman's League (3) ; Sec- 
retary Columbian Literary Society (4); 
President Beowulf Gedryht (4) ; Historian 
Class (4). 





J. B. HEADLEY, B. S. C. E. 

Y. M. C. A. 



OSCAR FRANKLIN GIBBS, B. S. M. E. 
Kappa Alpha 
Theta Psi 
Engineering Society; Y. M. C. A. 
Glee and Mandolin Clubs; Glee Club; 
Assistant Manager Track Team; Distin- 
guished Cadet; Silver Medal, Highest 
score at Target Practice; Captain Co. A. 
Corps of Cadets; Secretary Engineering 
Society; Manager Track Team. 

44 





HERMAN CHAS. KOELZ, B. S. C. E. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Mountain. President Junior Class 
'09. 



FRANK MARTIN POWELL, LL. B. 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

Columbian ; Ph. B. of Lebanon Uni- 
versity '08. 





C. C. SHEPPARD, B. S. M. E. 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
Theta Psi 

Cadet Corps; Cadet officers Club; 
Engineering Society. Vice President 
Class (1) ; President Engineering Society 
(4); Manager Track Team (3); Junior 
Prom. Com. (3) ; Monticola Board (3). 



VIRGINIA BRANSFORD NEAL, A. B. 
Chi Omega 

English Club; Columbian; Woman's 
League, V. V. Clerk of English Club ; 
Vice-President of Y. W. C. A. 

45 





ROSA FOLAU, B. S. 

Woman's League; Cercle Dramati- 
que Francais; Parthenon. 



J. M. RUSSEL, B. S. C. E. 

Columbian ; Engineering Society. 





CRYSTAL COURTNEY, A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta 
Y. \V. C. A.; Beowulf Gedryht; Col- 
umbian ; W£ma|n's League. Treasurer 
Y. \V. C. A. (i); President Y. W. C. A. 
12); Treasurer Woman's League (3); 
Delegate Y. W. C. A. Convention, Pake- 
side, ( ). and Winona Lake, Ind. (2) (3); 
Se Lytle Scop, Beowulf Gedryht (4); 
President Pan-Hellenic (2); Secretary 
funior Class. 



CARRIE M. DAGUE, A. B. 

Y. W. C. A.; Parthenon; Woman's 
League. Vice President P. L. S. ; Y. W. 

C. A. Cabinet. 

46 





DAVID BRIGHT REGER, A. B. 
Phi Kappa Psi 

Weslevan Club. 



PAUL REED MORROW, A. B. 

Sigma Nu 

English Club; Parthenon; Y. M. C. 
A. President Parthenon (3); Critic (3) 
(4) ; Inter-collegiate Debate (3) ; Monon- 
galian (4). 





H. M. SCOTT, B. S. C. E. 

Sigma Nu 

Sigma Delti Pi 

Theta Nu Epsilon 

Mountain ; Masonic Club ; La Dra- 

matique Francais ; Y. M. C. A. ; Cadet 

Corps; "V. V." Club. Athletic Board 

(1); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); Manager 

Varsity Reserve base ball team (2-31; 

Editor-in-Chief Monticola (3); College 

Cheer Leader (3) ; Treasurer Junior Law 

Class (4) ; Manager Varsity Base Ball 

Team (4). 

JOHN K. FINLAYSON, A. B. 
Delta Tau Delta 





JOHN B. GRUMBEIN, B. S. M. E. 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Engineering Society. 



S. O. BOND, A. B. 
Y. M. C. A. 





BROOKS S. HUTCHINSON, A. B. 
Delta Tau Delta 
Delta Chi 

Mountain ; Sphinx ; W. V. A. A. Ten- 
nis Club. President W. V. A. A.; Foot 
Ball Team 'o6-'o7. 



LEO CARLIN, A. B. 

Beta Theta Pi 

English Club. Monticola Board; 
Monongalian Board; Athenaeum Board. 

48 





ARETAS W. NOLAN, M. S. 
Kappa Alpha 
Grange. 



C. V. FELLER, B. S. M. E. 

Theta Psi 

Engineering Society: Athletic Board 
of Control. Secretary English Society. 





BOYD RANDAL, A. B. 

Parthenon: Y. M. C. A 



JOHN W. HALL, B. S. C. E. 

Engineering Society. President Sen- 
ior Class; Vice-President Engineering 
Society: Monticola Board '09. 

49 





LILLIAN BALLARD SMITH, A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta 

English Club ; Y. W. C. A. ; Woman's 
League. Monticola Board '08 ; Woman's 
League Board; Assistant Librarian; 
\ssistant Instructor in Prepatory History, 
Fall and Winter '08; Secretary Pan-Hel- 
lenic. 



CYRUS BIGGS VAN BIBBER, A. B. 
Kappa Alpha 
English Club; Y. M. C. A. V. V. 
Club ; Parthenon. V. V. Monticola Board 
'09; Treasurer of Class '07-8; Assistant 
Manager Foot Ball '07. 





CLEOPHUS SWECKER, B. S. C. E. 

Wesleyan Club. 



MAE B. SULLIVAN, A. B. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

English Club ; Woman's League ; Y. 
W. C. A. Historian Junior Class; Sen- 
ion Poet: Monticola Board; Athenaeum 
Board; Monongalian Board; Secretary 
Woman's League. 

50 





ROY OLNEY HALL, LL. B. 

Parthenon ; Mountain ; Corps Cadets. 
Regents" Gold Medal for drill and disci- 
pline corps of cadets '06; President of 
class '07; Prize saber to Captain of best 
drilled Company '07 ; Captain Co. B. 
Corps Cadets "o7-'o8 ; Cadet Major 'o8-'oo. ; 
President Parthenon. 



CLYDE BENNETT, B. S. C. E. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Sigma Delta Phi 

Masonic Club ; Engineering Society 
Officer in Cadet Corps. 





CLIFFORD S. MYERS, A. B. A. M. 

Sigma Nu 

Beowulf Club; Parthenon; Y. M. C. 
A. Athletic Board (4) ; Leader of Gym- 
nasium Team. 



H. A. REYNOLDS, B. S. C. E. 

Sigma Chi 

Sigma Delta Pi 

('.range; Y. M. C. A.; Parthenon; 
Engineering Society, ("dee Club '06-7, 
'07-8; Cadet Adjutant; Second .Marks- 
manship medal; Debating team '07-8; 
Monticola Hoard '08; Inter-Society con- 
test in debate '08; President Parthenon 
'09; Member Athletic Board '09. 

51 





G. K. ALLMAN, B. S. C. E. 
Sigma Chi 
President Buckhannon Club. 



SCOTT MURPHY, B. S. C. E. 

Engineering Society; Y. M. C. A. 





LLOYD B. SELBY, M. E. 

Engineering Society. I'.. S. M. K. 
'08; Studenl Assistanl in Mechanical 
I )raw insr. 



52 



WM. MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER, 
A. B. A. M. 

Delta Tau Delta 

Y. M. C. A.; English Club; Cercle 
Dramatique Francais. Elkins Pri/.e in 
Greek ( i ) ; Treasurer of Class (2) ; Edi- 
tor Monticola (3) ; Wiles First Prize Sen- 
ior Oratorical Contest (4) ; Instructor in 
German (1905-9) Member Athletic Board 
'06-7; Head of English Club '07-8; Pres- 
ident Y. M. C. A. '08-9. 



MAUDE FULCHER CALLAHAN, 
A. B. A. M. 

Chi Omega 

English Club. A. B. '08; Secretary 
Class (2). 



SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, A. B. 

Dean of Women. 



EDWARD R. GROSE, A. B. 

Columbian; Wesleyan Club: Vice- 
President Columbian (3). 



FLORA RAY HAYES, A. B. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Y. W. C. A.: Woman's League. 



GERTRUDE ROBERTS, A. B. 
Kappa Alpha Theta 
Y. W. C. A.: Woman's League: R. 1. 



53 




p^ 



The Diary off m sl Prop B M 





Oct. 10, 1905. 

There was a great time out on the campus last night. 
Gee! how I wish I was a Freshman. The way those fel- 
lows went in for the Sophs, was worth coming all the way 
fn.ni home to see. The Sophs, said that the class of 1909 
should not paint their numerals anywhere but I knew they 
would. The '09's are everywhere. They have painted the 
great big numerals on the roofs of Commencement Hall 
and the Observatory. I tell you it takes more than ordi- 
nary fellows to get ahead of men like "Dutch" Koelz, 
"Little Shep." and a lot of other Freshmen like them. 
Plucky, well I guess ! 
Mar. 17 1900. 

They have some mighty clever girls in that Freshman 
Class. One of the men told me about the rousing good 
time they had at their St. Felix celebration. St. Felix is 
their patron saint. 

All of the class arc wearing their blue and white col- 
ors and they give a yell which ends tip like this. 
— Class of )'/X). 
Give us room ! 

Sept 30, [906. 

I am only a "Prep." yet but how 1 wish I could be a 
Sophomore this year! The Sophomore class has elected 
that tall straighl llall man as their president. 



They have got the Freshman scared all right. 
June 2, 1907. 

I heard some Sophomore men talking in the Armory 
today. That class is always having the best times. They 
had a picnic party in the "gym." last evening. 

Mrs. Chez was there. She is their patroness, or god- 
dess, or something about the same as that. They said 
Miss Moore and "Hen" Snider drank pink lemonade out 
of a pickle bottle and enjoyed it immensely. 

The way those "naughty niners" stand by each other 
is simply great. The boys say the girls of the class "lend 
enthusiasm" to anything they undertake and the girls just 
swear by the Sophomore boys. 
March 10, 1908. 

The Sophs, had a "fiasco" or something worse, last 
night. They tried to get Herman Koelz and could not, 
but the Juniors captured "Pidgie" Point. They brought 
him in and introduced him to the ladies. 

It was good to see the drenching the Juniors gave 
those "Sophs". I reckon it will be talked and written 
about for a week. They say the way the Juniors "took 
off" the faculty, in their play that night was the cleveresl 
thing that ever was. 
April 1 1, 1908. 

I am going to learn to debate like Paul Morrow and 



r,i 



"Petey" Reynolds. The way they gave it back to those 
Wooster and W. U. P. fellows, was great. 
May 8. 

It was the best Junior "Prom." in eight years, Arthur 
Dayton said so. He ought to know, he has been in W. V. 
U. since Adam. 

"Hen" Snider was the chief engineer of the "Prom." 
Ada Neal was brakeman, she did the "coupling". Crystal 
Courtney painted the scenery for the moonlight dance. 

May 27. 

The way we beat \Y. and J. Oh me ! I yelled and yelled 
until I was too hoarse to whisper. But that Junior man, 
Hal Scott, never stopped cheering and pumping, and sway- 
ing like all possessed. "Delsarte", they call it, but I don't 
know what that is. 

Tom Gorby surely had that game "up his sleeve"." 
Joy ! how he did strike them out. 
June 12. 

The '09 Book is out. It has a beautiful yellow back. 
"The contents are original and interesting," I heard a man 



say so. They say too, that the boys helped three Junior 
girls write some of it. 
March 13, 1909. 

Those Seniors are always getting up something new. 
Tonight they had their last St. Felix party. 1 heard a 
visitor say that the "district school," teacher, trustees, and 
pupils were better than the real thing. 

Little "Jennie" Gibbs sang a solo, Billy Gather did 
"gym. stunts" and President John Hall, starred as "Buster 
Brown." 
June 16. 

They graduate today. 

Three of the "profs." were talking together the other 
day and I heard this much of what they <aid, — "Seniors'" 
— "exceptionally capable and original" — "excellent class 
spirit." 

I just grinned and said out loud, "right yen are." 

If ever I get out of "Prep." — if ever I do — I want to 
be in a class of jolly good fellows, just like the plucky, 
lucky, naughty niners. 




55 




Junior Class Officers 



JOHN T. MORGAN President. 

HARRY R. WILEY Vice President. 

ETHEL ICE Secretary. 

R. T. THAYER Treasurer. 

DORCAS PRICHARD Historian. 



57 




^ C^AJV^ CJlWv^) 



Mere's Allender, thoughtful and slow, 

"Happy Hooligan's" double, 1 trow; 

As a news reporter 

The) sa) he's a snorter. 

I lc mk up all night 

By the dim candle-lighl 

In order to make the law go. 




TTUl-^vTYU^ dt^xw: tv 




d^rxJ^fQ^M. 



A self-appointed authority 
( )n the horses' superiority, 

lie thinks he knows them well, 
lie's gained great notoriety 
By his opinions, and endless variety 
Such is Ernest Hell. 



MARY ATKESON, 

Miss Mary is not so contrary, 

Although of her smiles she is chary. 

She can study and write. 

\ot a word does she slight, 

\nd at Gym parties she looks like a fairy. 

58 




Though some people say he's a witty lad 

And others avow he's not lazy, 
And yet others assert that he never was 
mad, 
At least that just now he's not crazy. 
"Tis our candid opinion that Bill has de- 
ceived them, 
For none who well know him have 
ever believed them. 



Of one of us we're proud to tell. 

Of all this class he is the "belle" 

That he's married no one knows, 

That he's young his name shows, 

For the meaning of A. D. you know well. 





Do you know Wesl Virginia's fail blond? 

Of whom all the ladies are fond? 

For his dear taking ways 

In our hearts Fan a blaze. 

Oh flirtatious young Marcus O. Bond. 



59 




^6 /tf j%ujt&~c(. 

A. II. Bullard from Wheeling came 
To Morgantown to win a name; 
He "rushed" athletics for a while 
But was not quite up to the style, 
So he settled down the second yeat 
Just to be an engineer. 



A good-looking man with a good-natured 

smile. 
Who has been to college a good little while, 
He's good to the eyes, he's good to the 

heart. 
But he's never made good with Cupid's 

dart. 
In Y. M. C. A., good, in books lie is good. 
Likewise good in his clothes, and good at 

his food — 
A good all-round man, who is good at his 

part. 





$ -&r &^U~A.. 



We, the jury, do present, that said Crad- 

dock with good intent 
Came here to study law ; 
He settled down to be a grind, but Sigma 

Kappa changed his mind 
For in this youth they saw 
Material that was great: 
So, we the jury, do decree 
His release from custodee, 
This judge destined by fate. 



fy\^c^3 x*Jv*Jl^G-^-f 



60 




This is Cather, tall and slim, 
Shiny hair and light blue eyes ; 
All the co-eds smile on him, 
But his poor heart it terrifies. 



Some folks say he's a very hard worker 
It's indeed very evident that he's no shirk- 
er 
His habits are nocturnal 
And he wouldn't care and infernal 
To enter with his "Moon" into an eclipse 
eternal. 





Did you ever see Jimmy Dille. 

Who's a real society Willie? 

On his farm out of town 

He'll soon win renown. 

For a cracking good farmer he'll be. 



<%c?f£^p^ 



U^AZ-n^s- 



61 




Estill is a quiet lad 

Into society lie seldom branches; 
But, oh how mad it makes poor (denn 

When with Ada he goes to the dances. 



^/CX^K^T^y (-£ 



A man of title here you see 
With his B. A. and L I.. 1',. 
And now he wants I'.. S., C. K. 
Along with his rank in military, 
For the Skidoo Captain too, is he 
C If I ' S. Infantry, 23, 





^ 






Confidence is his great long suit, 

1'lentv of excitement he has to boot. 

Dressed spick and span 

We see Kckman. 

With all the co-eds he"s in cahoot. 



62 




Nina, always very quiet, 
Feeds on very plain "Math." diet; 
Perhaps it's true, as some have said, 
That she's become a mere "figure head." 



/ (£} (£> / v~&-*T-*2^' 



Truly Jack should be a cadet Colonel, 

He presents quite a splendid extolone'l. 

But oft to his sorrow 

Some poor blundering fellow 

Finds his language is something infolonel. 





$J$& 



An unassuming man is he. 

Laboring hard for his degree; 

His thoughts are legion 

(lis words are few 

Two are superfluous 

Where one will do 

(This quiet man of whom I sang 

Is the Foreman of our gang). 



~rtr- 



^JjxCUj^ 1 



63 




TYUhm^ 



xjj^L 



When you hear his hee-haw 
You tliink lie's a donkey; 
If you knew of his antics 
You'd call him a monkey; 
When you hear him approaching 
You think he's a horse; 
Bui he's only our Bobby — 
We love him, of course. 



Mary l-'ravel came ti i t< »wn 

Ti ok 'Gym' and had a breakdown 

Now zoology's her special 

And her troubles only facial. 





Z&r*~<LCi 



There was a young man named Could 

Who thought he could never be fooled; 

I le once took a chance 

( )n a Kappa Mu dance, 

So societ'v aeainst him was ruled. 



, 






/■ 



64 




We were about to label her a "grind" 
But now we've gladly changed our mind, 
For her walks with "Bob" Fitzgerald 
Are to us a welcome herald 
Of our Nellie's reformation 
Before her total 'nihilation. 



c^asvuj ^C $uJ^Lu_ — 



There was a young man named Griffin, 

But he wasn't a very swift one ; 

In the Library he'd sit 

While Emma did twit 

And help him to get his lesson. 





Before she returns to the Japaneeze. 
A missionary's our Miss Hodges 
Who in Alorgantown just lodges; 
Fanned bv this intellectual breeze 



9ltl'<-l S '}HLSnd&VK-4-nJ . 



65 




Iii catching trains she may be slow 

But she gets there in Greek and Anglow. 

She's a Fairmont import 

( ){ the very best sort 

Hence needs no boost 

To be anions: the foremost. 



Homer Augustus is his name, 
You hear his voice half a mile. 
In the past three years 
Me has gained great fame 
By his talking all the while. 





'^Z %/■ ^ZZ**^ 



"Let me have men who are fat :' 

Said Caesar, and then he spat. 

"Quite well tried," 

Young Jacobs replied, 

"I'm satisfied just where I'm at." 



£Oul3 



cfi_ 



66 




There is a young man named Koelz, 

Girls hearts by the dozen he melts. 

His very large smile 

Can be seen for a mile 

And his teeth — well they beat Roosevelt's. 



l&tf^z /Y 7tk^w^ 



There was a young Russian named Kahn 

AYho was known as a temperance man ; 

But when he was dead 

The people all said 

He died "a Russian de Kahn." 





Here is the man whom they call Finney 

Lakin. 
With law his poor cranium is fairly achin' 
He scorns the co-eds, 
Who have all lost their heads 
On account of his ways, which they say 

are so takin'. 




Now Grover Cleveland was a man 

To whom was honor due, 

To give their boy a start, they called 

Him Grover Cleveland, too. 

But he, with this illustrious name, 

Is lazy Lemley just the same. 



,°f^L^y^^^ 



"Queer, eccentric, puzzling, shy :" 

Thai is what they say, Lashley ; 

Come, leave your chess, and leave your 

"den" 
And "mix" a little with your fellowmen ; 
We're nol so very good at besl 
And not so very bad at worst. 
But when you know us you will find 
What wrong impressions were in your 
mind. 





^fia^y^a^-^^^ 1 ^^- 



Here's to Charles: Who hasn't a care 
As long as he's here and books are there. 
Laughing and joking's his day's occupa- 

li< n 
Kor which Hunks and mere passes are 

poi ir compensation ; 
But Charles doesn't mind. 
Prefers it to ""rind". 



kJ. (i ^< ■■ 2,rlXjSUs 



68 




He came to us with possessions two, 

A hammer and a trombone ; 
\\ ith the hammer he knocked, 

On the horn he blew, 
Till the rest of us didn't know what I 
Such a noise we never had known. 



^-taAxV JirfXi/ 



'f 



This charming young lady named Lytic 
Came out here in search of a tytle. 
She spoke English accent you see. 
But whether she asked for a Bachelor of 

Arts, 
Or whether she wanted a Bachelor of 

Hearts 
The committee cannot agree. 




69 




Margaret came here from VVesleyan ( 

lege 
And brought with her a lot of nollege; 

She thinks in French and speaks in Dutch 
< >f Latin and Calculus knows right mutch 
And further more 
She's a June vore ! 




Now Charley is a jolly lad, 

lie comes to class at noon. 

But once a month he will be bad 
Then we have a "full Moon". 



^p^-or*^^^^ 



There was a young student from Scott- 
dale, 

Who bluffed his Profs, by the wholesale, 

I le joined I )elta Tan 
Began t" "study" law. 
Did tlii— young -indent from Scottdale. 





^6^^^^ 



This is our well known "Mickie"' 

In politics said to be trick}-. 

lie's desperate on cases 

Champion of new girl races. 

For which he's gained much notoriety 

In the realm of female society. 



^JLj^9?1*+^. 



70 




There was a young man named Oldham, 

He was not a very bold one; 

When a girl he would spy 

Up the alley he'd fly, 

And no one was able to 'old 'im. 



The Juniors are proud of their Lee. 
No one else quite so quiet could bee. 
When the girls are around 
He cannot be found 
Because of his timiditee. 





o). /®. vaA&'wyKs' 

And here's our smiling friend Pat. 

Me can work, there- no doubt about that 

As a proof that he labors 

I [e's Irish, bejabers, 

From the soles of his shoes to his hat. 



£^*^(0£&hL 




"Kid" is a cheap athlete 
Who always goes in to beat 
And brings home a defeat. 
Books and clinics get little time 
From this "student" of the ills equine. 



Here's to Mrs. Peat her Sone! 

Who can ever heat her? None. 

'Tis fast she walks, but talks still faster; 

In grades no one can e'er go past 'er 

'Tis safe to admit on this side of the ocean 

She's the one example of perpetual mocean. 





w*W ^2^^ 



Q<^r/v 



There was a man named Peterson 
Whose major was Education, 
Managed the college paper 

"Just because." said he, "sir, 
I need the recreation." 






72 




Dorcas came down to our citee 
Straightway joined every committee. 
Books get the remnant of time and gr.v. 

matter — 
Not much of the former, and less < £ the 

latter — 
But somehow — 'tis a mystery, 
She gets right there in hystery. 



^U^U^U^r.y, 



To everything there is a point. 
Great, or large, or small. 

But the Point to which we here refer 
Is greater far than all. 

All through day and half the night 
This Point is always busy 

]f you will get my point of view, 



You'll see no one but 



'Pidgie." 





/jz^y^- 



Slow, happy calm, and ever free 
The peacefulest man in the 'Varsity 
He never talks if tremble Twill be 
but calmly works in the lab'ratory. 
In the '09 Monticola as we see 
Twenty-rive hours a day slept he. 
As time goes on it will change a degree 
"This year." says Don. "twenty-six for me." 




Whenever Friday night rolls 'round 
"Billy" Thacher's on the ground; 
lie hies him to the Columbian Hall 
And hears the others give their "spiel." 
Then he goes back into bis "den" 
'Til Friday night rolls 'round again. 



ft.+n.L 



\^Xdt 



Here's the polished young attornee 

Expert in all the law is he 

Divorces are his specialtee 

And bis clients all agree 

lie secures the largest alimonee. 





<£PcU/*m. C7-5 c £*y- 



There was a young man named Thayer 

Who was late most everywhayer, 

With Pat's daughter be went. 

Time and money be spent, 

We're sorry — be was too late thayer. 



74 




This is the girl who came from Vermont : 
Knew W. V. U. could supply every want. 
She never seems hurried 
And, what's more, worried 
About books or men 
Even of Class "ten". 



Scotland's braes are fair and bright, 

Her moors an' crags an' a' that. 

This lad, transferred, has made a good 

American for a' that. 

And bonnie is the highland lass 

With bonnet, plaid an' a 'that. 

One stole his heart before he came 

He's married now — and an' a' that. 




75 




M&*» fi & 



Our Helen, who stand- for enthusiasm, 
Over football and class meet- goes into a 

spasm. 
She gave up dancing and piety, 
Not because of satiety, 
But, (in accord with the general belief) 
For the duties of Assistant Editor-in- 
Chief. 




There was a man named Laban While, 

The fairies gave this merry wite 

Traits both rare and good; 

Wit and humor were his rood 

And la langue anglaise he spoke quite light. 



H^ttiJU^O U&n/txJ. 



There was a man named J. C. \ ance 

Will be a writer if he has a chance : 

Incunabula of thought 

With proper diction Frought 

]< this wonderful youth named Vance. 





^/(?. IkAv 



II. R. Wiley's a big Junior boss, 
From our athletics he'd be a big loss. 
In baseball he's won fame. 
In football he's game, 
And the "H" in his name stands for "Hoss' 



j/^^t- 



76 




This specimen of humanity 
Is worth a journey just to see, 
Four hundred and sixty-eight 
Is affirmed to be his weight. 
His face opens up in one big grin 
Till you're almost afraid of f 



falling in. 



She's a Wolfe, but not ferocious. 
Though in devouring- books she's 



quite 



precocious. 
She can sing and dance and elocute — 
But let not words her fame dilute. 





L. C.'s. a very young Young, 

Who tries to be a spurt. 

Quite -"(,n he'll be a stung Young- 

At least that's the repoi 



%((, ^°*jf*- 



11 




JUNIOR CLASS 




J. G. ALLENDER 
MARY M. ATKESON 
EDGAR D. BAKER 
A. D. BELL 
ERNEST BELL 
J. E. BILLINGSLEY 
M. O. BOND 
S. L. BRITTON 
R. S. BUCHANAN 

A. H. BULLARD 
M. C. BURNSIDE 
H. K. BURRELL 
LOUIS CORE 

B. W. CRADDOCK 
W. E. CATHER 

G. G. CREWSON 
JAMES DILLE 
H. A. EATON 
D. H. ESTILL 
J. R. ECKMAN 
J. C. EVANS 
NINA FOREMAN 
L. P. FOREMAN 
MARY FRAVEL 



R. M. GAWTHROP 
MARION GILCHRIST 
R. G. GOULD 
J. S. GRAYSON 
H. L. GRIFFIN 
NELLIE HENDERSON 
OLIVE HODGES 
H. A. HOSKINS 
ETHEL ICE 
DAVE KAHN 

A. M. JACOBS 
F. R. KOELZ 

F. S. LAKIN 

K. S. LASH LEY 

G. C. LEMLEY 

C. W. LOUCHERY 
CLARE BELLE LYTLE 

B. F. MAYER 
MARGARET MOCKLER 
J. L. MOLLISON 
CHARLES MOON 

I. H. MORAN 
JOHN T. MORGAN 
79 



L. II. MORRIS 

E. C. OLDHAM 

T. S. PATTERSON 

ETHEL CRIM PETERSON 

VERD PETERSON 

W. \V. POINT, Jr. 

M. DORCAS PRICHARD 

DONALD ROSS 

I'.. M. SMITH 

E. C. SMITH, Ir. 

ELEANOR V. STEELE 

W\ R. HACI1ER 

R. T. THAYER 

A. A. TORRANCE 

REX A TUTTLE 

HE LEX VANCE 

J. C. VANCE 

IE E. WHITE 

IE R. WILEY 

N. A. WOLFE 

VIOLA WOLFE 

C. C. YOU XT 

L. C. YOUNG 











L A Junior Class Poem 




Two years ago a happy crowd 
Were found in Morgantown ; 

They quickly met the Sophomores, 
As quickly rushed them down. 



And then at once the cry was heard, 
It rang from day to day, 

"This jolly crowd of Freshmen 
Have surelv come to stav." 



Another year had rolled along, 
Again this class was found ; 

And then, as Sophomores they rushed 
The Freshmen off the ground. 



And loud the cry re-echoed. 

From north, south east and west, 
'The mighty class of 1910 

1> West Virginia's best." 



80 



And so the time has brought us on, 
A year has rolled around; 

And now the class of 1910 

As Juniors here are found. 



What vict'ries will be won this year 
To make us known to men ? 

We'll make a record great and true 
For the class of 1910. 



And yet, before we are aware 
Another year will pass ; 

And then as noble seniors 

You will find this glorious class. 



And then again as oft before 
'Twill ring in every tone, 

"This wondrous class of 1910 

Thro' history will be known." 



And then another year — and where 
Will this great comp'y be? 

The 'Varsity we love so well, 
Xo more our class will see. 



But yet throughout all future years 
Our class will hold its -way: 

For in West Virginia's memory 
This class has c< ime to stav. 



81 







82 






£^^^>Sg<^ 



s^ 







Introduction — Putting forth the purpose and aim of this his- 
tory. 



To refresh your memory of many former incidents, and 
to render a just tribute of renown to the many great and 
wonderful transactions of our Junior Class, I submit this 
short historical treatise. In a little while, thought I, the 
Juniors, who now serve as the towering monuments of 
good grades, will have passed their linals and enrolled as 
Seniors, and then another little while and they will have 
departed this life and become real people in the big busy 
world; the sophomores and freshmen will be engrossed by 
the empty pleasures of their time and neglect to treasure 
up the recollections of the past, and preps will search in 
vain for a written record of the days of the Juniors. The 
records of our class will be buried in Jack Hare's office, 
and even the names of Frederick, the Editor, Wiley, the 
Batter, and Wolfe, the good-natured will be enveloped in 
tradition and fiction like those of Smith and Hal, of Thomas 
and Herman. 

Determined, therefore, to avoid any such misfortune I 
set myself to work to collect and record all the fragments 
of our infant history. In my search for the records of this 
class I have gleaned many diaries, minutes of class meet- 
ings, and memory books. Nor must I neglect to acknowl- 



edge my indebtedness to that very admirable ami praise- 
worthy book, the Monticola, to which I hereby publicly re- 
turn my sincerest thanks. 

Chapter I. 

Containing an account of the matriculation and the 
first year's achievements of this class. 

According to the best authorities it was in the month of 
September 1906 that there came to the University an ex- 
ceptionally bright band of boys and girls. The benevolent 
faculty of the college beheld their intelligent faces and 
immediately proceeded to matriculate them. They intro- 
duced among them some regular class work, "Gym," Col- 
lege spirit. Library, and the other comforts of college life, 
and it is astonishing how soon these students learned to 
estimate their blessings. 

No sooner were these new students enrolled and well 
established in regular work than there appeared on the 
bulletin boards notices for them to meet on a certain even- 
ing at six-thirty for it would seem the snobbish Sophomores 
had challenged them for the annual class rush. Accord- 
ingly these new students met and elected L. X. RYAN as 
their leader. And now that these new students had or- 



83 



ganized they were entitled to an honest college name, and 
so they were called Freshmen. 

Immediately after the birth and christening of this new 
class they stationed themselves on the campus to await the 
appearance of their enemy. Soon the Sophomores march- 
ed into the circle and stationed themselves in front of the 
Freshmen. The upper class-men crowded on the front 
steps of Woodburn Hall, that blest resort whence so many 
encouraging cheers have been wafted, so many a fair hand 
waved, and so many tearful looks been cast by home sick 
co-eds. 

The Sophomores gave a terrible shriek, the spectators 
gave a mighty cheer and the battle was on. Thrice did the 
snobbish Sophs advance and thrice did the invincible Fresh- 
men drive them back. Thus did the Freshmen come out 
victorious in their first college battle and they returned 
to their homes determined to he the most illustrious class 
in the history of the University. 

lint this rush was not to be their only victory for soon 
after it they met the Sophs on the gridiron and were again 
gloriously victorious. The basket-ball season followed. The 
desperate Soph, fought hard but they were too weak and 
again the Freshmen won the honors. There was just one 
chance left for the down hearted Sophomores. "Surely," 
they thought, "we can beat them in the track-meet." Never 
were wise men more mistaken in conjecture, for out of the 
one hundred points to he gained the Freshmen won seventv- 
three. J 

Thus, I hope, I have clearly set forth and strikingly 
illustrated how the class of "io came to the University and 
manfully surmounted all obstacles and subdued all oppon- 
ents in their freshman year. 

Chapter II 

In which is recorded the reign of the valiant Pidge Point. 
So a year passed, and when the class of [910 returned 



to the University after their summer vacation they were 
called Sophomores. Soon they proceeded to elect officers 
for the year and wisely chose the valient Pidge Point to 
rule over them. 

A council was immediately appointed to warn the 
Freshmen to prepare for the annual class rush. The stated 
time for the rush arrived and the foes met on the regular 
battle-field. As the Freshmen had repulsed their enemy the 
year before so now as Sophomores they swept the Fresh- 
men from the field and once more they were declared the 
victors in the annual class rush. 

Some weeks after the excitement of the class rush had 
died away and times were becoming very dull a terrible 
calamity befell the Woman's Hall. In relating this calam- 
ity I shall relieve hundreds of boys from embarrassment and 
gratify the curiosity of equally as many girls. 

One morning early in October when the girls entered 
the dining room they were greeted with the remark, "Girls, 
our nice new hall is ruined. The boys have painted -Hen- 
nery" on it in big black letters." I forbear to treat of the 
long consultations they had in planning how they should 
catch and punish the offenders. (Just this one word of 
warning, however— The penitentiary was mentioned.) 

But how did it all happen? How did the hall get 
painted without any one knowing it, and who did the paint- 
,n g? Again I hesitate to give detailed accounts. Suffice 
to say that on the night of the awful disaster, when all with- 
in the Hall were sleeping— all except the third floor grind- 
lour boys appeared under her window. With scarcely a 
sound. Tidge and Hud Smith took their places as guards, 
and Dick as chief painter with the able assistance of Mick- 
ey had painted our new hall with "black tar" and then dis- 
appeared, and to this day no one has the slightest idea who 
did it. 

As the weeks went by the Sophomores worked steadily 



84 



on. The Juniors were much given to long talks and the 
Sophomores to long silences. The Juniors made great prep- 
arations for a class party and through their much talking 
about it the Sophomores scented the possibility of having 
some fun by delaying the progress of the party. 

After supper two Sophomore girls started out for a 
short walk. Soon they were joined by other members 
of -the class and then still others. When it was time for 
the party to begin the Sophomores were ready to begin 
their perilous enterprise. After a few skirmishes it was 
decided to let them begin their party. When the party 
was fairly well begun, the electric light plug was taken by 
a wary Sophomore and the Juniors were left in the darkness 
and the fight was renewed. The hose was the chief weapon 
of defense and in their consternation the Juniors turned it 
with full force right on the night-watchman who had come 
to their rescue. 

Manifold were the characteristics of that class that were 
revealed that memorable night. Thieves there were among 
them who stole our president's hat and never returned it. 
Bribers, too, were among them who bribed the janitor to 
keep us out of the gymnasium ; yea, and even cowards who 
would not leave Woodburn Hall till the city police had been 
called to guard them on their march to the gymnasium 
where they partook of their refreshments amidst much 
sneezing. 

It remained yet for the Sophomores to prove their 
social ability, so the valiant Pidge Point called a council to 
plan a social event. The council wisely decided to give a 
boat party. Notwithstanding the council was amazingly dis- 
creet in making their plans for the party, one of the talkative 
Juniors heard some of the plans and spread them abroad 
among the Freshmen, and advised and planned with them 
how they should prevent the party. 

The evening for the party came at last. The crowd 
Leathered at the wharf, the street was crowded with specta- 



tors; excitement was high. Mickey had been stolen and 
they were trying to get Pidge and Dave. The boat whistl- 
ed, the crowd started on the boat; the storm broke and the 
fight was on. Long hung the contest doubtful, but when 
the gang plank was raised every Sophomore was on the beat 
except Mickey and Dave. Great was the sorrow of the class 
to leave them behind, but greater was their joy when about 
an hour later they were joined by Mickey at Star City. 
This party was voted the best class party ever given in the 
University. 

Thus end the authenticated chronicles of the golden 
reign of the valiant Pidge Point. 

Chapter 3. 

In which is made known the plans of the Junior-. 

Now had the vacation passed and the Sophomon 
1908 returned and registered as Juniors, for not one had 
failed in his finals. Like as a mighty hero when urged by 
the din of battle did this illustrious class feel that it must 
be up and doing, accordingly they convened in Commence- 
ment Hall and held their election, and Mickey was elected 
and declared ruler, and Frederick was elected and declared 
Editor-in-chief of the Monticola. 

The Editor-in-chief at once commanded his force- and 
begun work on the Monticola, which will be not only the 
largest but the most admirable and praiseworthy Monticola 
ever published. 

Moreover the whole class under the guidance of Mickey 
the chief ruler and Billingsley, the High Mogul of the 
Junior Prom, are perfecting plans for Junior week which 
will be the first event of the kind in the school and will 
be a model for coming Juniors to pattern from. The field 
day on Monday will be the greatest oi its kind ever wit- 
nessed in Morgantown. The boat party on Wednesday 
promises to be even better than the one given by the class 



85 



last year. And the grandeur of the Junior Prom, on Fri- 
day night will far surpass any Junior Prom, or Military Ball 
ever given in this Armory. 

And now, gentle reader, 1 have told you what this class 



has done and intends to do. In a short time they will have 
proved what I have promised, and will say, '"Surely these 
Juniors have never been equalled." 




86 



GEORGE MILTON SHOUGH 

Class 1910 

Born, June 8, 1883 

Died, January 4, 1909. 



I 



87 



WILLIAM GLENN HALL 

Class 1910 

Born, June 6, 1886 

Died, June 15, 1908. 



88 




HARRY C. STULTING, President. 

JAMES H. RIDDLE, Vice President. 



B. F. GRIMM, Secretary. 

B. L. HUTCHINSON, Treasurer. 



,89 



i oy3.&^ 



CLAY I). AMOS 

LEDA C. ATKESON 

CI IAS. G. BAKER 

HOWARD R. BARTLETT 

EMMA BEALL 

C. C. BURRITT 

I.. E. BOUTWELL 

JESSE G. BUTCH 

G. BURNSIDE 

AGNES CADY 

HARRY L. CAMPBELL 

LUCY CLARE CLIFFORD 

I. W. COLE 

ST WXLEY R. COX 

NELL II. COX 

WALTER B. CROWL 

G. II. CUMMINS 

I. E. DILLE 

CL VRE H. DICKESON 

W. I. DONLEY 

M. S. DONNALLY 

A.YXA ELLK >'!' 

B. R. FITZGERALD 

II. !•'.. I ; L< )ERECKY 



E. M. FLING 
C. V. GAUTIER 
A. H. GRIGG 
S. C. GROSE 
GEORGE W. GROW 
GEORGE H. GUNNOE 
THOMAS L. HARRIS 
|. R. HAW ORTH 
JULIOUS HEFKE 
JUSTIN HENDERSON 
JOHN C. HOSKINSON 
ELSIE M. KRAEMER 
CHAR LI'S M. LOUGH 
T. R. McMINN 
FLORA E MONTGOMERY 
NANCY MORGAN' 
MARJORIE B. PATTERSON 
1). L. MURRAY 
THOMAS C. PITZER 
HERMAN B. POCOCK 
ROBERT REED 
R( )SC( >E REEVES 
PEARL L. REINER 
|( )IIN L. ROBINS* >N 

90 



LONNIE W. RYAN 
SAMUEL H. SANGER 
RUSSELL L. SATTERFIELD 
KATHERINE SHEPLER 
GOLDIE SHEETS 
RENNIE B. SMITH 
W. H. STARBUCK 
GENEVIEVE STEALEY 
RODNEY M. STEMPLE 
MARION E. TAPP 
CLAUDE S. TETRICK 
WILLIAM R. THATCHER 
M. L. TAYLOR 
PAULINE THEAKSTON 
II. P. TOMPKINS 
E. II. TUCKWILLER 
GEORGE T. TWYFORD 
HELEN M. WIESTLING 
LEWIS L. WILSON 
STELLA R. WILSON 
EMILY I. WILMOTH 
C \RL C. Y< >UNT 
11 S. WANDER YORT 
WAITMAN F. 7.1 NN 




fr«.rt»5J HTbowxT^". 



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c^= 



Whoever has made a voyage up the .Monongahela must 
remember the Cheat .Mountains. At the foot of these 
mountains the voyagers may have descried the University 
buildings high up on College Hill. In that same village 
'here lived many years since while the country was still 
'.art of Virginia a good natured fellow by the name of Rip 
Van Winkle. In a long ramble one fine autumnal day Rip 
unconscicously scrambled to Cooper's Rock. He fell asleep. 

On waking he looked for his gun and dog, but they 
were gone. With some difficulty he got down upon the 
road and approached Morgantown. lie soon reached the 
outskirts of "Falling Run." A troop of cadets passed him. 
In approaching what he thought was King George Ill's 
picture, he saw a green sign and upon inquiry was told that 
it was a few kind suggestions given to the Freshmen by 
their well wishers— the Sophomores. 

Rip had but one question to ask. and he put it in a fal- 
tering voice: "Who are the Sophomores?" 

Oh, the Sophomores! Just two years ago, in the fall 
of [907, an illustrious class came to the University. P.efore 
many weeks had passed by all the students and even the 
gray-haired professors were amazed by their learning and 
Studiousness. But the characteristic that attracted most 
attention was the class spirit* ?) This was displayed early 



and late and at all times — the most notable for this particu- 
lar trait of any class in the memory of the institution. 

Unfortunately, this class forgot to name a patron saint 
to guard its welfare and lo, when they met their foes in the 
class rushes they had no saint to protect them from defeat. 
But it is only the great that can take reverses. From this 
time the representatives of the class fought hard on the 
foot-ball, basket-ball and track teams and covered them- 
selves with honor. Never once did this illustrious class 
meet defeat in basket-ball during the past two years. They 
carried away the laurels in foot-ball, being champions in 
1907 and 1908. Never once did the bold, bad Freshman 
cross the goal line in 1908, 

"'Is there anything more?" said Rip. 

"( )h. yes! The boat ride! The boat ride! 

Last spring the rival class planned a boat ride and 
again was called forth the courage and fortitude of the class. 
Carefully laid plans were carried out by the boys, directed 
by their President, Lee Hutchinson. The Secretary and 
I 'resident of the rival class were taking supper at the Stag 
Restaurant. Stealthily the boys drew near and boldly 
carried the Secretary to Sabraton. After much delay the 
said party started on their ride down the river without their 
Secretary — and many without their hats, coats and shoes! 



92 



These the heroes on the wharf collected as souvenirs and 
they can be seen among the archives of the Sophomore 



class. 



"Is there anything left to tell?" gasped Rip. 



But cue thing mure. Judging the future by the past, 
this dauntless, invincible class will go down through its 
college existence winning laurels and palms of victory. 

HIST< >RIAN. 




93 



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=J> 




IVAN R. SPEARS, President. 

ROBERT T. FELGAR, Vice President. 

ETHEL EMMA FERGUSON, Secretary. 

GEORGE ROGERS CLARK, Treasurer. 

WIRT G. FAUST, Historian. 

95 



V Freshman CIsss Hell 



IS 




cC 




ASA W. ADKINS 
[RENE M. ANDR1S 
EDNA ARNOLD 
R. P. BECKETT 
F. P. BEST 
L.J. BERNSTEIN 
[ACKSON V. BLAIR, |R. 
ROBERT S. BLAKE 
WALTER BRADLEY 
BARNETTA BALL 
ARTHUR BRINDLEY 
ANNE -M. BROOKS 
A. B. BROOKS 
EDGAR BROMLEY 
[ENNIE BOUGHNER 
LILLIAN MAN' BOUGHNER 
BERNARD CONRAD 
ERNEST CONAWAY 
MYRTLE CHENEY 
LENA M. CHARTER 
F. F. COOPER 
ANNA GRACE COX 
THOMAS \\ . CRAW FORI) 
ANNA B. DARLING 
GAIL DAVIS 
HELEN M. DE BERRY 
[OHN I). DUNKLE 
' >TT< I I). ELSON 
EUGENE E. EVANS 



WIRT G. FAUST 
ROBERT P. FELGAR 
ETHEL EMMA FERGUSON 
MILTON D. FISHER 
JOHN R. FISH WATER 
HOWARD FLESH MAN 
ROBERT M. FRENCH 
K. G. GALLAHER 
VAN WEGENEN GILSON 
I. S. GIBSON 
MABEL C. HODGES 
MARGARET HOPWOOD 
ALEX C. HOFFMAN 
JUNE HOUSTON 

I. H. GOTSCHALL 

II. E. CRESS 

II. D. GROVES 
ROBERT GROGG 
|( )SEI'H GRUBB 
FRANK HALL 
GLENN HUNTER 
C II. HARRIS 
I. II. HICKMAN 
\\ . ]•. HUNT 
I.ora F. [CE 
WILLIE I'-. [ORDAN 
M. A. I I'LL 
HARRY KEAR 
J. J. KENNEDY 

96 



H. H. KERR 
H. S. KIRK 

HELEN R. KNOWLTON 
P. B. LANTZ 
A. L. LAMB DIN 
WILLIAM LOUGH 
JACKSON McCOY 
XAXCY MARSH 

F. R. MACEXXAY 

u >gan Mcdonald 

O. G. MARSTILLER 
C. G. MARTIN 
E. G. McVEY 
E. P. McCOOMBS 

G. G. MEANS 
SAMUEL J. MORRIS 
J. T. MORRIS 

O. L. MORRIS 

GEORGE OSBOURNE 

A. V. OSTERBERN 

JULIA OTTO 

BEULAH F. PICKENPAUGH 

CLARK POOL 

CECIL POST 

ROSCOE POSTEN 

A. C. PIERCE 

W. B. RILES 

E. C. PIXLER 

F. I. PYLES 
CLYDE ITCH 



P. P. REIXER 

PAUL RIDER 

H. T. ROGERS 

ARTHUR ROSS 

F. SHIXX 

FRANK SANDER 

GEORGE SCOTT 

EDITH SMITH 

IVAN SPEARS 

LEOLA SMITH 

AXXA STURGISS 

OLIVER SHURTLETT 

LIDA 1. SIX 

WILMA SPEARE 

WARD SPENCER 

THEODORE STARBUCK 

ILL. STILPHIN 

II. S. SYDENSTRICKER 

SUSAN SMITH 

R. TAYLOR 

FRED VANDALE 

GEORGE VIEWIG 

A. II. WALKUP 

M. M. W ATKINS 

GLADYS WATERS 

RHEA W. WARDEN 

II. G. Will'. AT 

W. F. WELLS 

II. II. WHITE 

C. B. Wl l.SOX 




Freshma n Class History 



c^ : 



1 



It is a pleasure to write concerning the doings of the 
Freshman class of 1909 — to record them so that classes yet 
unborn shall have a sure and safe guide to follow. 

Early in the fall of 1908 there enrolled in the West 
Virginia University as freshmen about ninety young men 
and young women who, from the day of their first appearance 
in school, gave assurance of great ability. They entered 
quietly and earnestly upon their duties and very soon made 
their influence felt in all departments of the school. The 
Literary Societies, seeing the talent in this new class, began 
at once to draw upon it for members. The Christian or- 
ganizations of the school took on new life and energy after 
having added to their membership workers from the Fresh- 
man class. Fraternities and other organizations saw that 
so great an opportunity for getting in new men and women 
of unusual ability must not be neglected. 

( me morning last fall the Freshmen arose and found 
glaring announcements of their arrival in school posted in 
prominent places in the town. These announcements con- 



tained certain fixed rules of conduct for the Freshmen and 
offered a challenge to a class rush on the campus. This 
challenge from the Sophomore class was one which the 
Freshmen had been anticipating, and when the time came 
they quietly yet mightily asserted themselves in such a way 
that the Sophomores fled and indeed the last of them are 
just now cautiously returning one by one to school. 

In the estimation of the faculty the Freshmen class 
stands high. In English ten and in English eleven the 
literary talent of the class has shown itself to be of a very 
superior quality. Which statement can be verified either 
by Professor Patterson or Professor Smith. 

Indeed, so great a reputation has been made by this 
class that the world is already looking to it for its future 
leaders in education, law, politics, medicine, science, liter- 
ature and athletics. And thus the class of 1912 closes its 
first year of history making. 

—HISTORIAX. 



<^3g^ 



%w 



=4&S2&- 



98 



GLASS ORGANIZATION 

HOWARD HARWOOD HOLT, President. 

EVAN ALLEN BARTLETT, Vice President. 

CHARLES EDWARD PEDDICORD, Secretary. 

JAMES DEFORIS PARRIOTT, Treasurer. 

TRE VEY NUTTER, Historian. 

CARROLL T. SENCINDIVER, Cheer-Leader. 

JOHN LANE HAWLEY, Football Captain 



99 




GLASS ROLL 





HOWARD CURTIS BARRON Shamokin, Pa. 

EVAN ALLEN BARTLETT Hepzibah. 

RUSSELL SCOTT BIDDLE Morgantown. 

DONALD ORR BLAGG Point Pleasant. 

WILLIS WILLIAM BOLLES St. Marys. 

RALPH WINEBRENER B< >RDER Kearneysville. 

ROLLO |. C< >NLEY Fairmont. 

CECIL LLEWELLYN CRICKARD Huttonsville. 

RAFAEL .MARIA CUEVAS Luguillo, Porto Rico. 

MARIAN T. CURRY Delphia. 

HENRY I). EDDY Morgantown. 

GUY GIL-MORE FELKER Martinsburg. 

CM AS. W. FREEMAN Huntington. 

R< >Y ( >LNEY MALI Morgantown. 

WILLIAM GAIL HAMILTON Wellsburg. 

|( * 1 1 X LANE HAWLEY Bluefield. 

EDWARD M. HINERMAN Moundsville. 

THOMAS STEWART HOFFMAN Morgantown. 

HOW ARI) HARWOOD IK >I.T Grafton. 

EDWARD FRED HORSTMANN Wheeling. 

I AMI'S IK (WARD HUNDLEY Smoot. 

JOHN PALMER HUNDLEY Masontown. 

BENJAMIN BASSEL IARYIS Clarksburg. 

HARRY LEE l< >NES Huntington. 

WILLIAM MICHAEL KENNEDY Fairmont. 

GARNETT KERR KUMP Concord. 

FINNEY LEE LAKIN Terra Alia. 



JOHN SHERMAN LILLEY Hinton. 

CHARLES LIVELY Weston. 

FRED M. L1VEZEY Ashton. 

SAMCEL EDWIX LOVE Montgomery. 

JOHN W. MAS( )X, Jr Fairmont. 

EARL LINSEY M AXW T.LI Elkins. 

HUBERT DAVID MAN' Charleston. 

HARRY EVERT McCAMIC Wellsburg. 

FRENCH McCRAY Fairmont. 

A LI AX CECIL McNELl Wheeling. 

AUBREY WILLIAM MERDITH Fairmont. 

RICHARD WRIGHT NEBINGER Steelton, Pa. 

TEEN EY NUTTER Fairmont. 

LACY BURKE < >"XEAI Fayetteville. 

I AMES DEFORIS PARRIOTT Cameron. 

CHARLES EDWARD PEDDICORD Morgantown. 

FRANK MARTIN POWELI Clarksburg. 

I. LESTER PRICE New Brighton, Pa. 

RUSSELL SAGE RITZ Bluefield. 

C \RR( >LL T. SKXCI NDIVER Martinsburg. 

HARRY WILBUR SHEETS Lost Creek. 

ANDREW KEMPER SHELTON Huntington. 

I AM ES B. SI I REWSBERRY Beckley. 

GE< >RGE E. WHITE Weston. 

\ \R( )\ W [NER Morgantown. 

EGBERT ELMER YOUNG Hamlin. 



100 




lass History 




From the time whereof the memory of man runneth not 
to the contrary it has heen the custom to have a short 
memorial of the Senior Law Class recorded in the Monticola 
for deposit in the archives of the University. This custom 
the Class of 1909 here continues by recording its autobiog- 
raphy. 

We (the Class of 1909) were born at Woodburn Hall, 
West Virginia University, the eighteenth day of September, 
in the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
seven, and in the forty-fourth year of the State. 

From the time of our birth we have been the favorite 
son of both Father Hogg and Mother Purfnton. They 
watched us grow and develop with as much pride as if we 
were their first born. Nothing was left undone for our 
education, physical, intellectual, or moral, especially the 
latter. Every Sunday morning .Mother Purinton togged 
u- out and started ns to Sunday school, while Father Hogg 
saw that we attended divine services at night. 

As most boys, we were, during our boyhood, often the 
cause of the most earnest solicitation of not only our parents, 
hut of our relatives, friends, and neighbors as well. But 
they all had Faith in us in varying degrees, or perhaps we 
should sa\ hopes of us. except neighbor Deahl. lie lived 
near us and followed the training of wild animals. Just 



why we stood so low in his estimation we could 
quite understand, unless it was because we did, some 
smoke cigarettes. But there was one, our own Aunt 
the law librarian, (may God bless her, dear soul) wl 
the utmost faith in us and at all times insisted that w 
the most orderly, gentlemanly, and promising class t 
the University family. 

In college we have been most active and duly he 
We have always been looked to as the fountain sot 
all college spirit — and holidays, too. Lincoln's hi 
would not now be one of our state holidays had \ 
first so decreed it. The old Gold and Blue owes to 
honor she has won upon the diamond and gridiron 1 
as in the arena of debate. 

The hours that we have spent in the class roori 
ever be a source of pleasant memories and of kind r 
to our dear professors. The Judge (Father Hogg 
the head of the law faculty as dean and is ably assis 
Doctors Brooke and Willey, "Piggie," our elder half b 
and professors Trotter and Barnes. Early in our 1 
work Dr. Brooke's health failed and he was on that a 
compelled to retire from the class room. We wt 
friend and he was ours, and our prayer is that Pro\ 
will ever deal kindly with him. It was at this tin 



102 



Charley (Piggie) came to us, taking Dr. Brooke's place; 
and, to tell the truth, we got along fine, to be so closely 
related. It was at the beginning of the senior year that 
Professor Trotter made his debut and started out to make 
quadrupeds of us. For what reason we never understood, 
unless it was to train us for the turf, but we wouldn't trot, 
nor even let him ride ; so, after a consultation with the 
Judge (they all have to go to the Judge in a pinch) it was 
determined that we be allowed to continue our legal studies, 
which we have continued to do in a very satisfactory man- 
ner under the guidance of this most thorough professor. 
Our greatest concern was occasioned in the winter quarter 
of the senior year by the illness of Dr. Willey, which for 
a time kept him from the class room. We knew we loved 
him, but never knew how much until we thought we were 
going to lose him. We hope he can continue at his post 
long enough, at least, for our younger brother, the Junior 
Class, to finish his training for the battles of life. No one 
knows better than he how to handle this young reprobate, 
this youngster who has so often caused his father to become 
"crestfallen and humiliated at his unsophistocated conduct." 



There are many incident- in cur shorl life which you, 
no doubt, would like to read, but space and time forbid. 
However, we cannot close without saying a few words 
about the most happy experience of our life thus far. name- 
ly, our courtship and bethrothal to Miss Law. Jt is said 
that love is blind, but we know that we are not speaking 
as one who is blind, when we say that she is the mi >st beauti- 
ful sensible, and lovable little girl that ever lived. We th< mght 
many times that we could never win her, but the very 
thought that she could ever belong to another spurred us to 
redoubled action, and, thank God, it is settled, she is to be 
ours. Ours will be a June wedding and will be celebrated just 
as soon after commencement as the courts can issue our li- 
cense. We will be most sadly disappointed if this union 
does not prove to be both a happy and fruitful one. Within 
a few years we expect to furnish to the great state of West 
Virginia and to the Nation sons whose influence for good 
will know no end and whose praises will cease to be sung 
only when time shall be no more. 

HISTORIAN. 




103 




fcr^ArSi 




F. W. McCULLOUGH, President. 

E. L. HOGGSETT, Vice President. 

J. L. CALDWELL, Secretary 

H. M. SCOTT, Treasurer. 

M. C. GILCHRIST, Manager Track Team. 

SAM BIERN, Cheer Leader. 



105 




J. 


G. ALLENDER 


G. 


\\ . ALLISON 


E. 


1). BAKER 


G. 


BUFANO 


B. 


T. CLAYTON 


R. 


J. CONLEY 


U. 
II. 
I). 
O. 
L. 
S. 

J- 

I.. 


W. CRADDOCK 

G. CROGAN 

A. CRONIN 

C. EVANS 

F. EVERHART 
S. FRIEDMAN 
II. HABERMEHL 

II. HARLESS 



G. II. HARRIS 

JUSTIN HENDERSON 

J. C. [ONES 

R. S. JUDGE 

I. N. KEE 

A. F. KISAR 

I). C. KURNER 

C. R. LAMAR 

T. T. LEMEN 

1'.. K. LITTLEPAGE 

F. \Y. LTYIXEY 

L L. MOLLISON 

W. K. PRITT 

R. E. PARRISH 

Yl. M. RAMIREZ 



J. H. ROBINSON 
E. C. SCOTT 
\Y. F. SEGER 
H. G. SHORES 

B. M. SMITH 
ENOC SMITH 

C. J. SMITH 
L. M. SMITH 
SAMUEL SOLINS 
II. E. STAN SB DRY 
L. A". THOMPSON 
R. E. WATSON 

K. II. W FA DEN 
AUSTIN MERRILL 



106 




Junior Law ©lea 



\ 

/ 



^ 



Early in the fall of i<jo8 there came into the West 
Virginia University a great throng of students to take the 
law course. Tims was the beginning of the Junior Law 

Class. 

Xow the members of this vast throng soon realized 
that there must be an organization, and to further this idea 
the class came together for the election of officers. Great 
was the excitement at that meeting, but it ended in har- 
mony with all officers elected. 

Later, the class met to determine whether or not it 
should accept the Honor System. After some lengthy 
discussion the Honor System as already laid down was 
unanimously accepted. 



At election time the members of the class became en- 
thusiastic for holidays. After several meetings and confer- 
ences with the faculty, three days were allowed in which to 
go home and exercise the elective franchise. 

During the winter term Prof. W'illey became very ill, 
and was compelled to relinquish his duties. The Junior 
class in its solicitation for his welfare kept flowers in his 
room constantly. When he finally returned to his duties 
he was welcomed with applause. 

The class began its work for the spring with a light 
course, the winter course having been very heavy. 

HISTORIAN. 




108 






\^>m^^m^^ 







OFFICERS 

PAUL RIDER, President. 

T. L. HARRIS, Vice President. 

ARCH C. WEAVER, Historian. 

A. H. GRIGG, Marshall. 

CLASS ROLL 

UJTURO CARBONELL C. V. GAUTIER CARL C. YOUNT 

T I HARRIS A. C. WEAVER W. T. ZINN 

\ || GRIGG H. H. SPERLING L.O.MORRIS 

PAUL RIDEK VV. B. PILES 



110 



Sophomore Medloal History 



Since it has been the custom of preceding classes to 
leave behind them a short remembrance of their history 
while at VV. V. l\, It becomes my most pleasant duty to 
give our fellow students a few characteristics which stand 
out very particularly in the members of the Medical Class 
of 191 1. Our class is made up of honor men who stand 
for those things highest in the profession we have chosen 
for our life work. We are not the largest class in the 
University as regards to size, but we do feel that in the 



future we can look back to the Sophomore Medical class oi 
[909 with pride and truthfully sav it was the greatest med- 
ical class ever turned out of the University. It appears 
that fate lias decreed that the Medical Class of i«,ii sh 
set a standard in the West Virginia University that all 
future classes will strive to reach, onl) to fall shi rt of llicii 
goal, not because of lack of effort, bul because the -tan 
was too high. 

HISTORIAN 




111 




Freshman Medical ©tass 





.4 



OFFICERS 

A. W. ADKINS, Kappa Psi, President. 

CECIL O. POST, Kappa Psi, Delta Tau Delta. Vice Pres. 

L. DALE JOHNSON.Kappa Psi, Secretary. 

S. J. MORRIS, Kappa Psi, Treasurer. 

CLASS ROLL 

ASA \Y. ADKINS, Kappa Psi 

CECIL <). POST, Delta 'Pan Delta, Kappa Psi 

T. DALE fOHNSON, Kappa Psi 

S. I. M< >RRIS, Kappa Psi 

C. C. RYAN 

S. E. HENDERSON 

G. VANE SCOTT, Phi Kappa Psi 

HARRY L. STYLPHEN, Kappa Psi 

[AMES K. GUTHERIE, Kappa Psi 



112 



V Freshman M#dloal History ^ 



^. 



^_b 



€Z 






The members of the Freshman Medical Class of 'n 
being principally country-bred and innocent children, were 
noticeably flustrated by Prof. Hodges' almost invariable, 
not wholly incorrect, diagnosis of their previous mental 
attainments at other institutions of learning less ponderous 
in matters Phychic than our university of W. Va. ; but have, 
thanks to the very judicious reassurance of Professors 
Grant and Simpson, regained control of their rough and 
honest country selves. We do not like to be irreverent, 
but most of us feel rather comfortable and assured of being 
M. D's. at the end of the usual number of years for the 
completion in recognized Doctors incubators, of the diges- 
tion of the necessary amount of predigested logic, and for 
the assimulation of the necessary facts of the science. 

Now I will try to do justice full to a few of the mem- 
bers of the class in the way of some not uncomplimentary 
remarks of a personal nature. What can be said about 
these quiet, retiring youths? Truth, we cannot blame them 
for their quiet demeanor. Who could? Has many ever 
struggled under such difficulties, the mental depression due 
to the anticipating of so many years toil, still, persisting to 
some extent? 

Hoping my digression has not wearied you, let's first 



cheer up, but gently, our President. Adkins was our oldest 
member at the time of organization and, being ready to 
take hold of and hold on to difficulties until they were 
dislodged or something broke, was elected by those of us 
who were less experienced in worldly ways is an efficient 
pilot to safety. The class is prospering. 

Mr., yes, Mr., Post had a soothing effect on the eye-, 
if not a Ciceronic expression, and was selected as sour Vice- 
President. His passive, interceding attitude has made itself 
evident in his agreeing with brother Henderson that only 
children would cut class. 

Our Secretary, Mr. Johnson, is a married, married 
man away from his wife. 'Tis enough, let us pass on. 

Now a few facts about some of those less fortunate i if 
such is a proper description of the condition) in publicity. 

We have never had a chance to become acquainted with 
Sam Morris. He is always not to be seen except when on 
duty, never on Saturday night. Sam has a sill}' smile. 

Scott is getting over the shock from being thrown on 
his own resources against the world, and directly at a six 
foot four at that. 

Ryan, we hope, will find out that 'tis not all of life to 
study. 



114 



Mr. Stylphen has not yet become disillusioned as to the 
hypothesis that "Idleness is the root of all evil;" which 
should be written or at least translated, "All idleness is at 
the root of evil." Pardon the error in copying. 

Some of our colleagues have temporarily abandoned 
the fitting of themselves for the relief of suffering humanity, 
for various reasons. Others we will not discuss, since 
pages, yes even lines in the Moirticola are valuable. Isn't 
it the Junior publication of W. V. U. ? 

The present members of the class, described and other- 
wise, are all honest, upright, robust boys who bid fair to 
make the world stop so that the Sun may take a look at 
their achievements in a stationary condition while they are 



not going 'round, going 'round. 

The Freshman medical clas- i^ largely representative 
of the Kappa Psi fraternity, which has been started in the 
school a few months back. Dr. ('.rant was principally in- 
strumental and his efforts promise to be requited by ;i 
ing, formidable organization of students with strong char- 
acter, studious and sober habits. Such should be the cor- 
ner stone of any organization. 

Now to be still more serious, the '11 boys mean busi- 
ness and really the world's people will find it out. Thank- 
ing you for vour attention, 

THE HISTORIAN' 




115 



\ i S «. o r. t I 



J 

i I 









9 







_r1 



■4ErF 




Fraternity founded Jefferson College, 1852 

COLORS- Pink and Lavendar 
FLOWER- Sweet Pea 



119 



Jfeetf Wiripttitt JUplta (filmpfcr 



Established May 23, 1890 



FRATES IN URBE. 



REV. A. M. BUCHANAN 

G. B. MILLER 

J. K. BUCHANAN 



A. F. DICKEY 
C. N. RIDGEWAY 
C. D. WILLEY 



FRATES IN FACULTATE. 



G. P. GRIMSLEY 
F. W. TRUSCOTT 



MADISON STATHERS 
RUSSELL TROTTER 



W: P. WILLEY 



FRATES IN UNIVERSITATE. 
1909. 

W. G. HAMILTON C. L. CRICKARD 

HERMAN C. KOELZ W. M. KENNEDY 

AUBREY W. MEREDITH D. B. REGER 



1910. 

LEROY H. MORRIS 
FRED R. KOELZ 
R. M. GAWTHROP 

J. R. EC K MAN 

1911. 

RODNEY M. STEMPLE 

ROBERT S. REED 



J. C. EVANS 
F. W. McCULLOUGH 
J. L. CALDWELL, Jr., 
AUSTIN MERR1L 



WARD II. SPENCER 



G. V. SCOTT 

T. W. CRAWF< >RD 



1912. 



120 



C. F. POOL 
JAMES KENNEDY 



Jljxll xtf JUiifce Olltaptos 



Washington and Jefferson College 

Bucknell University 

Dickinson College 

LaFayette College 

Swathmore College 

Amherst College 

Cornell University 

Columbia University 

Johns Hopkins University 

University of Virginia 

West Virginia University 

Vanderbilt University 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Ohio State University 

University of Indiana 

I niversity of Illinois 

X< >rth western University 

University of Wisconsin 

University of Minnesota 

University of Kansas 

University of Missouri 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University 



Case School of Applied Science 

Allegheny College 

Gettysburg College 

Franklin and Marshall College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Dartmouth College 

Brown University 

Syracuse University 

Colgate University 

Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 

Washington and Lee University 

University of Mississippi 

University of Texas 

Wittenberg University 

De Pauw University 

University of Chicago 

University of Michigan 

Beloit College 

University of Iowa 

University of Nebraska 

University of California 



122 



Fraternity Founded 1873 

COLORS -Silver and Magenta 



123 



Established February 24, 1891 
FRATES IN URBE. 



WALTER II. SOUTH 
ARTHUR LEE BOYERS 
TERRENCE DAVID STEWART 
THEOPHILUS SUTTON BOYD 
DAVID CAMPBELL GARRISON 
CASSIUS M. LEMLEY 
WILLIAM WINFRED SMITE 



EDGAR STEWART 

[AMES CARROLL FRAZER 

WILLIAM MOUNT SIVEY 

PRESCOTT C. WHITE 

ROBERT W. FISHER. Eta Chaptei 

DAVID C. REAY 

F. S. BOWMAN 



FRATES IN FACULTATE. 
CLEMENT ROSS JONES JAMES II. STEWART 

RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS 

HARRY A. EATON FRANK BATSON KUNST 

JOHN B. GRUMBEIN . 

FRATES IN UNIVERSITATE. 
1.909. 
JOHN B. GRUMBEIN L. S. BACKMAN 

I'.. WALTER KING ~ PRANK M. POWELL 

C. C. SHEPPARD FRANK R. YOKE 

TREVY NUTTER 

19 10. 

HARRY A. EATON G. G. LEMLEY 

I T. MORGAN BANTZ W. CRADDOCK 

JASPER X. KIH-;. Jr. 
1911. 
[AMES H. RIDDLE FRED E. VANDALE 

THOMAS G. PITZER EARL PEARCY 

GEORGE T. TWYFORD \\ A 1 T.MAX T. ZIXX 

WILLIAM I 1 .. PILES 



JACKSON V. P. LAIR. Jr. 



1912. 



E. D. BROMLEY 



IN MEMORIAM. 

CHARLES SMITH 

Died April, 1909. 

12 t 



jtaitfee Chapters 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Cornell University 

Yale University 

University of Maryland 

Pennsylvania State College 

George Washington University 

Lehigh University 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Queens College 

Dartmouth College 

Williams College 

Brown University 

Swarthmore College 

Union University 

West Virginia University 

College of the City of New York 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

Columbia University 

St. Lawrence University 

Franklin and Marshall College 

St. Johns College 

I 'Diversity of Virginia 

University of California 

University of Pennsylvania 



Ahtmui (6hiits 

New York Club 
Boston Club 

Albany Club 
Southern Club 
Morgantown Club 
Philadelphia Club 
Connecticut Club 
Pittsburg Club 

126 



'igtttct fillti 



Fraternity Founded at Miami University Ohio, 1 355 

COLORS— Old Gold and Sky Blue 
FLOWER— White Rose 



127 



Established May 18, 1895 



FRATRES IN URBE. 



VVM. ELLSWORTH GLASSCOCK 
HOWARD LLEWELYN SWISHER 
JOSEPH HENRY McDERMOTT 
JEAN VALJEAN COOKE 
MICHAEL ^EUGENE GORMAN 
BOAZ BAXTER COX 
PAUL H. MARTIN 
C. EVERETT CASTO 

CORWIN S. 



REV. McCLAREN BRYDEN 

ALEXANDER GORDON TAIT 

JUSTIN M. KUNKLE 

JOHN HOFFMAN SCHISSLER 

JOHN ALDEN PURINTON 

HAVEN CHESTER BABB 

REV. JOHN A. YOUNT 

L. D. ARNETT 

BURNS 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 



GEORGE KARL ALLMAN 
HARRIS A. REYNOLDS 



1909. 

GEORGE E. WHITE 
BENJAMIN BASSEL JARVIS 



CHARLES LIVELY 



1910. 



CHARLES W. LOUCHERY 
WILLIAM VANKIRK McCREERY 
RICHARD J. GOULD 
CARL CASSMAN YOUNT 
WM. SIDNEY LAIDLEY 



BURRELL KEMPER LITTLEPAGE 
HARRY LEWIS GRIFFIN 
RALPH T. THAYER 
JUSTIN HENDERSON 
ROY EARL PARRISH 



1911. 

STANLEY R. COX HERBERT E. FLOERCKEY 

HARRY EDWARD SPERLING 



GEORGE MORRIS OBBORN 



1912. 

WALTER ALVIN ANDERSON 
128 



$>zltixt (dJtatpters 



First Province. 

George Washington University 
Pennsylvania College 
Bucknell University 
Dickinson College 
Lafayette College 
Pennsylvania State College 
Lehigh University 
University of Pennsylvania 

Second Province. 

Washington and Lee University 

University of Virginia 

Third Province. 

West Virginia University 

Miami University 

University of Wooster 

( )hio Wesleyan University 

Denison University 

( )hio State University 

Central University of Kentucky 

University of Cincinnati 

State University of Kentucky 

Fourth Province. 

Indiana University 
DePauw University 
Butler College 
I fanover College 
Purdue University 

Fourth Province. 
Northwestern University 
Beloil College 

Illinois Wesleyan University 
University of Wisconsin 
Albion College 



University of Minnesota 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
University of Chicago 

Sixth Province. 

University of Nebraska 
University of Iowa 
University of Kansas 
Colorado College 
University of North Dakota 
University of Missouri 
Washington University 

Seventh Province. 

University of Mississippi 
University of Texas 
Tulane University 
Vanderbilt University 
University of Arkansas 

Eighth Province. 

University of California 
University of Southern California 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Montana 
University of Utah 
University of Washington 

Ninth Province. 

I lobart College 

Masschusetts Institute of Technology 

Cornell University 

Dartmouth College 

Columbia University 

University of Maine 

Syracuse University 



130 



Fraternity Founded 1850 at University of 
Pennsylvania 

COLORS-Old Gold and Black 



131 



Alftlra %nmvm Chapter 

Founded 1896 

FRATRES IN URBE. 

EDWARD MILLER GRANT EDWARD GREGG DONLEY 

RAY V. 11 EN. YEN THEODORE J. ARTHUR 

JOHN GJLMORE ROSS SAMUEL GROVE CHADWTCK, Jr. 

DAVID HOTT, Jr., JOHN LEISURE HATFIELD 

MARRY JOHN ZEVELY CHARLES WILLIAM HELD 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 

CHARLES EDGAR HOGG CHARLES JAMES HOGG 

THOMAS BOND FOULK 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1909. 
EDWARD FREDERICK HORSTMAN RICHARD WRIGHT NERINGER 
FINNEY LEE LAKIN CHARLES EDWARD PEDDICORD 

LAKIN FISK ROBERTS fOH-N W. HALL 

1910. 
GEORGE HAROLD CUMMINS KARL HARPER WEADON 

GARNET KERR KUMP GLENN HUNTER 

IRVING HAGUE MASON HARRY ROBERT YOUNG 

PHINNEY PORTER REINER 

1911 

FRANK PHILLIP BEST JOHN CRAGS HOSKINSON 

1912. 

CHARLES WALLACE NESTOR FOREST MILLAN McDANlEL 

M. MARSH WATKINS [AMES [ACKSON TURNER 



IN MEMORIAM. 

GEORGE MILTON SHOUGH 
Died January 4, 1909. 

132 



:tafht£ Slmntrcs 



& 



Alpha University of Pennsylvania. 

Delta Washington and Jefferson College. 

Epsilon Dickinson College. 

/eta Franklin and Marshall College. 

Eta University of Virginia. 

Iota Columbian University. 

Mu Tulane University. 

Rho University of Illinois. 

Tan Randolph Macon College. 

Upseton Northwestern University. 

Phi Richmond College. 

p s j Pennsylvania State College. 

Alpha Alpha Washington and Lee University. 

Alpha Gamma West Virginia University. 

Alpha I )elta University of Maine. 

Alpha Epseton Armour Institute of Technology. 

Alpha Zeta University of Maryland. 

Alpha Theta University of Wisconsin. 

Alpha lota Vanderbilt University. 

Alpha Kappa University of Alabama. 

Alpha Lambda University of California. 

Alpha Mu Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Alpha Xu Georgia School of Technology. 

Alpha Xi Purdue University. 

Alpha ( hincron University of Michigan. 

Alpha Pi University of Chicago. 



134 



[Southern] 

Fraternity founded at Washington and Lee 
University, 1865 

COLORS — Crimson and Old Gold 
FLOWER— Red Rose and Magnolia 



135 



Established March 10, 1897 

FRATRES IN URBE. 

THOMAS RAY DILLE LEROY TAYLOR 

JAMES ROGERS MORELAND \ITIIA WARMAN 

l,KI - 1 - R Y RICHA ™[ } , UNDSAY BEPEDDICORD 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 
ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG THOMAS'E HODGES 

ARETUS W. NOLAN 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1909. 

OKi'i MGGS K VA N N C ST B iS?r B F™ RLES WILKERSON FREEMAN 

1 ' KL> M(.(,s \ A.\ BIBBER LACY BURKE O'NEAL 

ARETUS WILBUR NOLAN 
1910. 
DAVIS HUDSON ESI ILL EDW \RI) CURTIS 01 l)!i \\r 

AD \l 1 K in- ' '; ',c u JAMES ROD GERS HAWORTH 

\ i\ -r r o v Uh '- R ROBERT SIMMS [UDGE 

VEKU I !•. I ERSON ERNEST BELL ' 

1911. 
WALTER BERYL CROWL CHAR] ES GEORGF i'\k-pi> 

EARL WOODDELL SHEETS OTTO DALE ^ON 

ALONZO BEECHER BROOKS 
19x2. 
JOHN SHACKLEFORD GIBSON JOSEPH ALLEN WILLIAMS 



136 



^ttll xtf ^tihxt Qttxixyltt* 



Washington and Lee University 

University of Georgia 

Wofford College 

Emory College 

Randolph-Macon College 

Richmond College 

University of Kentucky 

Mercer University 

University of Virginia 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Southwestern University Georgetown, Tex. 

University of Texas 

University of Tennessee 

Davidson College 

University of North Carolina 

Southwestern University, Greensboro, Ala. 

Vanderbilt University 

Tnlane University 

Central University of Kentucky 

University of the South 

University of Alabama 

Louisiana State University 

William Jewell College 

William and Mary College 

Westminster College 



Transylvania University 
Kentucky University 
University of Missouri 
Johns Hopkins University 
Millsaps College 
George Washington University 
University of California 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Arkansas 
Georgia School of Technology 
West Virginia University 
] lampden-Sidney College 
University of Mississippi 
Trinity College 

North Carolina A. & M. College 
Missouri School of Mines 
Bethany College 
College of Charleston 
Georgetown College 
Delaware College 
University of Florida 
University of Oklahoma 
Washington University 
Drury College 



138 



Fraternity Founded 1859 

COLORS— Purple, White and Gold 

FLOWER— Pansy 



139 



(lamma Helta (Eljapter 

Established May 24, 1900 

FRATRES IN URBE. 

GEORGE C. STURGISS (Delta Prime) JAMES D. GRONNINGER, 'o6 
IOSEPH MORELAND (Gamma) ROSS C. SHRIVER, '01 

JAMES L. CALLARD (Kappa) 
REV. J. C. ELY (Gamma) 
FRANK P. CORBIN 01 
WILLEY S. JOHNS 02 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 
SIMEON C. SMITH (Beta Mu) WILLIAM M. BAUMGARTNER, '03 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 



E. CLERC SMITH 
U( ; BERT E. SNYDER 
BROOKS. S. HUTCHINSON 

JOHN' L. MOLLISON 

M. STARKE DONALLY 
R. LEE HUTCHINSON 
HERBERT W. WHITE 



1909. 

JAMES W. FERRELL 
JOHN K. FINLAYSON 



1910. 



1911. 



A. MELVILLE JACOBS 

CLAY I). AMOS 
GUY H. P. URN SIDE 



l< >SEPH K. GRUBB 



1912. 

JACKSON McCOY 
CECIL O. POST 



140 



^ttxb? €knnitt$ 



Southern Division 

Yanderbilt University 
University of Mississippi 
Washington and Lee University 
Emory College 
University of the South 
University of Virginia 
Tulane University 
George Washington University 
University of Texas 

Western Division 

University of Iowa 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
University of Colorado 
Northwestern University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Nebraska 
I Diversity of Illinois 
University of California 
University of Chicago 
Armour Institute of Technology 
Baker University 
I diversity of Missouri 
University of Washington 

Northern Division. 

( )hio University 

I Diversity of .Michigan 



Albion College 

Western Reserve University 

Hillsdale College 

Indiana University 

Depauw University 

University of Indianapolis 

Ohio State University 

Wabash College 

West Virginia University 

Purdue University 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Kenyon College 

Eastern Division. 

Allegheny College 

Washington and Jefferson College 

Lafayette College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 

Renssealaer Polytechnic Institute 

University of Pennsylvania 

Lehigh University 

Tufts College 

Massachusetts Institute cf Technology 

Cornell University 

Brown University 

Darthmouth College 

Columbia University 

Wesleyan University 

University of Maine 



142 







JLL ^0 e 



Founded at Miami University, Ohio. 1839 

COLORS— Light Shade of Blue and Pink 
FLOWER— Pink Rose 



143 



eat Itrgtma Irta -flat (Eljapfrr 

Established September 15, 1900 

FRATRES IN URBE. 

FRED FLENIKEN R. D. PRICE 

\V. H. KENDRICK A. W. LORENTZ 

E. I). BAKER C. K. JENNESS 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 
A. M. REESE WAITMAN BARBE 

N. L. GOODRICH 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1909. 

E. M. IIINERMAN II. L. SHEETS 

H. L. JONES LEO CARLIN 

1910. 

G. W. AIJJSSON G. H. HARRIS 

T. L. HARRIS J. L. GRAYSON 

J. II. GOTSHALL 

1911. 

L. F. ICE A. II. GR1GG 

L. L. WILSON C. C. BURRITT 

II. L. CAMPBELL 

1912. 

I R. SPEARS J. L. TRIGELLES 

II. A. KKAR R. S. BLAKE 



144 



JVrtite OlJmpters 



Amherst 

Boston 

Bowdoin 

Brown 

Dartmouth 

Maine 

Columbia 

Rutgers 

Stevens 

Wesleyan 

Yale 

Davidson 

Hampden-Sidney 

North Carolina 

Virginia 

Central 
Texas 

Missouri 
Oklahoma 

Washington 

Westminister 

California 

Stanford 

Colgate 

Cornell 

St. Lawrence 

Syracuse 

Toronto 

Union 

Dickinson 

Johns Hopkins 

Kenyon 

Ohio Wesleyan 

Vanderbilt 

Bethany 



Cincinnati 

Miami 

Ohio University 

Ohio State 
West Virginia 
Beloit 

Washington State 
Chicago 
Illinois 
Knox 
Michigan 
Western Reserve 
Wooster 
De Pauw 
Hanover 
Indiana 
Purdue 
Wabash 
Lehigh 
Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State College 
Washington & Jefferson 
Wittenberg- 
Case 

Dennison 
Colorado 
Denver 
Kansas 
Northwestern 
Wisconsin 
Iowa 

Iowa State 
Iowa Wesleyan 
Nebraska 



146 



Fraternity founded at Richmond College, Va., 1901 

COLORS— Purple and Red 
FLOWERS— Red Rose and Violet 



147 



Okmma !?ta (Hljapfrr 



G. K. TRACY 



FRATRES IN URBE. 

GAYL.ORD DENT 
GEORGE W. PRICE 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1909. 



THOMAS D. GORBY 
CLYDE M. BENNETT 
GUY B HARTLEY 



HARRY R. WILEY 
CHARLES MOON 



C. B. WILSON 
H. 1). POCOCK 



II. G. win-; \T 
A. R. ROSS 



1910. 



1911. 



1912. 



S. P. HOLLO WAY 
E. L. SWEARINGEN 
ALEXANDER D. BELL 



J. E. BILLINGSLEY 
MORRIS C. BURNSIDES 



CLAUDE S. TETRICK 
EARNEST PIXLER 



II. II. KERR 

W. G. CR1CHTON 



148 



^tiibt €knnltx$ 



Richmond College 
West Virginia University 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Pittsburg 
University of Illinois 
University of Colorado 
Jefferson Medical College 
William and Mary College 
North Carolina A. and M. College 
Ohio Northern University 
Ohio State University 
Norwich University 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Purdue University 
Syracuse University 
Washington & Lee 
Randolph Macon College 
Georgia School of Technology 
Delaware College 
University of Virginia 
University of Arkansas 
Lehigh University 
Virginia Military Institute 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Norfolk, Va. 



149 



^ixjttra $n 



Fraternity founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1869 



COLORS-Black, White and Gold 
FLOWER— The White Rose 



151 



damma fit (Etjapter 

Established Feb. 24, 1904 

FRATRES IN URBE. 

WARREN HAMPTON HODGES ROBERT RODMAN GREEN 

FRANKLIN MARION BRAND 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 
1909. 
CARROLL EDWARD CUMMINS IAMES DEFARIS PARRIOTT 

JOHN LANE IIAWLEY ARTHUR MAPLE LUCAS 

HALLECK McGINNIS SCOTT PAUL REED MORROW- 

CLIFFORD MYERS 

1910. 
THOMAS HENRY BECKER THOMAS SCHAFFER PATTERSON 

MARCUS ORAN BOND ARCHIBALD HUFF BULLARD 

CLYDE F. SC( )TT 

ign. 

LONNIE WATERSON RYAN BRUCE GRIMM- 

HARRY COOPER STULTING ARTHUR AQUILLO RRINDLEY 

HAROLD P. TOMPKINS 

1912. 
[OHN F. MILLER- MOSS FRENCH 

ROBERT DUNCAN • RUSSELL 1 1. GIST 

ROBERT FELGAR WIRT G. FAUST 

ROBERT C. GROGG LOGAN McDONALD 



152 



^tliht €\mnUts 



University of Virginia 

University of Georgia 

University of Alabama 

I toward College 

North Georgia Agriculture College 

Washington & Lee University 

Bethany College 

Mercer University 

University of Kansas 

Emery College 

Lehigh College 

I Iniversity of Miss< iuri 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Texas 

Louisana State University 

Cornell College 

Georgia School of Technology 

I University of Washington 

North Western University 

\ University of Vermont 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

University of Colorado 

University of Wisconsin 

I "Diversity of [llini lis 

University of Michigan 

M issouri Schools i if M. & M. 

Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

Wesl Virginia I Iniversity 

Dartmouth College 



University of North Carolina 
Tulane University 
DePauw University 
Alabama Poly technical Institute 
Purdue University 
( )hio State University 
Leland Stanford University 
Lombard University 
Indiana University 
Mount Union College 
University of California 
University of Iowa 
Williams Jewell College 
Carolina College of Agriculture and .Me- 
chanical Arts 
Rose Polytechnical Institute 
Albion College 
LaFayette College 
I Iniversity of ( )reg« m 
Colorado School of Alines 
Cornell University 
State College of Kentuck) 
University of Chicago 
Iowa Slate College 
I 'nivcrsity of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
I 'ni\ ersity of Montana 
Syracuse University 
Case School of Applied Science 
University of Pennsylvania 



154 



Fraternity Founded at University of Virginia, 1868 

COLORS-Garnet and Old Gold 
FLOWER— Lily of the Valley 



155 



JUpIm €\x?tn €\mfhx 



Established 1904 






FRATRES IN URBE 

MICHAEL J. MALAMPHY 
JOSEPH HENRY MILLS 
JOHN BYERS 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



LAWRENCE COOK YEARDLEY 
ALEXANDER HARDIE FOREMAN 



H. H. HOLT 



B. M. SMITH 



(). G. MARSTILLER 
r. L. CORE 



1909. 

CARROLL T. SENCINDIVER 

A. C. KNIGHT 

1910 

H. L. WHITE 
R. E. WATSON 

1911. 

E. W. FOREMAN 
J. C. K1NSEY 
P. B. LANTZ 

1912. 

J. E. STURGISS 



156 



J^rftto (fahnnitt* 



Alpha University of Virginia. 

Beta Davidson College. 

Gamma William and Marry College. 

I )elta Southern University. 

Zeta University of Tennessee. 

Eta Tulane University. 

Theta Southwestern Presbyterian University. 

lota Hampden-Sidney College. 

Kappa Transylvania University. 

Mu Presbyterian College. 

Omicron Richmond College 

Pi Washington and Lee University. 

Rho Cumberland University. 

Tan University of North Carolina. 

Upsilon Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Phi Roanoke College. 

Chi University of the South. 

Psi Georgia Agricultural College. 

Omega State University. 

Mpha-Alpha . . Trinity College. 
Alpha-Gamma . Louisiana State University. 
Alpha-Delta .. Georgia School of Technology. 
Alpha-Epsilon .North Carolina A. & M. College. 
Alpha-Zeta ....University of Arkansas. 
Alpha-Eta ... .University of State of Florida. 
Alpha-Theta ...West Virginia University. 



Alpha-Iota . ...Millsaps College. 
Alpha-Kappa ..Missouri School of Mines. 
Alpha-Lambda Georgetown College. 
Alpha-Mu I niversity of Georgia. 

ALUMNI CHARTERS 

Alumnus Alpha . . Memphis, Tenn. 

Alumnus Beta .... Richmond, Va. 

Alumnus Gamma . White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 

Alumnus Delta . . Charleston, S. C. 

Alumnus Epsilon . Norfolk, Va. 

Dillion, S. C. 

New ( )rleans, La. 

Dallas, Texas. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Charlottesville, «Va. 

Opelika, Ala. 



Alumnus Zeta 
Alumnus Eta . . . 
Alumnus Theta . 
Alumnus lota . . . 
Alumnus Kappa 
Alumnus Lambda 



Alumnus Mu Fort Smith, Ark. 

.Alumnus Nu Birmingham, Ala. 

Alumnus Xi Lynchburg, Va. 

Alumnus Omicron Spartanburg, S. C. 

Alumnus Pi Gainesville, Ga. 

Alumnus Rho .... Lexington, Kv. 
Alumnus Sigma . Raleigh, N. C. 

Alumnus Tau Salisbury, N C. 

Alumnus Upsilon . Charlotte, N. C. 



158 



SElteia: $\x (Epsxlim 

Founded at Wesleyan University 1876 

COLORS— Green and Black 



159 



ftfcefct Jfit €|rsilntt 



FRATRES IN URBE. 
JUSTIN M. KUNKLE ALBERT FORD DICKEY 

CHAUNCEY DeWITT WILLEY GILBERT BENTON MILLER 

HARRY JOHN ZEVELY EVERETT CASTO 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 
C. EDMUND NEIL ROSS SPENCE 

JOHN NAT MAX SIMPSON 
FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 



HAL SCOTT 
CARL C. YOUNT 
JOHN HAWLEY 
SCoTT BIDDLE 
DICK GOULD 
JOHN CORE 
KEMPER SHELTON 
KEMP LITTLEPAGE 



DAVE KAHN 
LEWIS CORE 
MARK MONO 
"RILL" MASON 
AUSTIN MLR RILL 
B. M. SMITH 
HARRY JONES 
T( >.M HARRIS 



160 



C. C. SHEPPARD 

HUGH BARNES 



©wfc f si 

Established West Virginia University 1908 

COLORS- Scarlet ar.d Light Blue 



FACULTY. 

Prof. E. F. CHURCH. Jr. 
1909. 

C. V. KELLER 



191c. 



T. S. PATTERSON 

E. C. OLDHAM 



o. F. GIBBS 



J. T. MORGAN 



1911. 

BERYL CROWL GUY DONLEY 

L. L. WILSON' 



162 



Founded 1878 at Columbia Univetsitv 

COLORS— Scarlet and Gray 
FLOWER— Red Carnation 



165 



Established November 16, 1908 

FRATRES IN URBE. 
R. S. JOHNSON 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE. 

Prof. J. L. SHELDON, Ph. D. 
Prof. J. F. GRANT, Ph. B., M. D. 

Prof. A. M. REESE, Ph. D. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1909. 

A. C. WEAVER 

1910. 

S. J. .MORRIS 

1911. 

A. A. BRINDLEY 
ARTl'RO CARBONELL 
PAUL RIDER 
CLAUDE GAUTIER 

1912. 

A. \\ . ADKINS 
J. K. GUTHRIE 
DALE JOHNSON 
CECIL 0. POST 
II. L. STELPHEN 
W. r>. PILES 

166 



^tixbt (llmiriters 



Columbia University 

University of Maryland 

Maryland Medical College 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 

University of Alabama 

Birmingham Medical College 

Vanderbilt University 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy 

Medical College of South Carolina 

University of West Virginia 

Louisville College of Pharmacy 

University of Nashville 

Tulane University 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, At- 
lanta, Ga. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, P>al- 
timore, Md. 

University of Alabama 

ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
Baltimore, Md. 



168 



Founded at Lombard College: Galesburg, Illinois, April 17, 1893 

COLORS -Light Blue, Dark Blue and Gold 
FLOWER- Pink Rose 



171 



iota (ftljapier 



Established May 8, 1905 

SCRORES IN URBE. 

-MRS. CARL HARRISON SMITH MARY FRANCES CIIADWICK 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1908. 

ETHEL AVERIL GREEN MABEL JANE WEAVER 

1909. 

LILLIAN BALLARD SMITH CRYSTAL COURTNEY 

ADA MOON 

1910. 

MARY STEWART FRAVEL MARY MEEK ATKESON 

ETHEL CRIM PETERSON EDNA JACKSON 

1911. 
LEDA CORDELIA ATKESON LEOLA MAY SMI PI I 

1912. 
EDITH SMITH 



172 



Lombard College Galesburg, 111. 

Iowa Wesleyan College Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 

Alt. Union College Alliance, Ohio 

Bethany College Bethany, W. Va. 

I 'niversity of South Dakota Vermillion, S. D. 

Wittenburg College Springfield, Ohio. 

Syracuse University Syracuse, N. Y. 

University of Wisconsin Madison, Wis. 

West Virginia University Morgantown, W. Va. 

University of Illinois Champaign, 111. 

Tuffs College Boston, Mass. 

University of Minnesota St. Paul, Minn. 

Washington State University Seattle, Wash. 

ALUMNAE CHAPTERS 

Alliance Alumnae Alliance, Ohio. 

Mt. Pleasant Alumnae Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. 

Boston Alumnae Boston, Mass. 



174 



dllti ©ntega 



Founded at University of Arkansas, April 5, 1895 

COLORS — Cardinal and Straw 
FLOWER— White Carnston 



175 



®lj?ta (ftljapter 

Established June 2, 1905 

SORORES IN URBE. 

MRS. JOHN HARRINGTON COX MRS. WAITMAN T. BARBE 

.MRS. FREDERICK W. TRUSCOTT AIRS. EDWARD MENTZER 
.MRS. CHARLES RUSSEL HUSTON MARGARET VIRGINIA FOULK 

JESSIE JENKINS 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

1909. 

LORENA LEE FRIES VIRGINIA RRANSFORD NEAL 

ADA MAY NEAL LOIS FLORENCE SIMMONS 

MALI) FULCHER CALLAHAN 

1910. 

HELEN BLANCHE VANCE 

1911. 

LUCY CLARE CLIFFORD EMMA REALL 

EMILY WILMOTH CLARA ELIZABETH DICKASON 

1912. 

HELEN RIGGAN KNOWLTON RHEA WATSON WARDEN 

ETHEL FERGUSON ESTHER GILMORE 

EDITH C< >( AIRS 



176 



$4x11 xal Jkzlibt (JLJbapfccs 



University of Arkansas 
Kentucky University 
University of Mississippi 
Randolph .Macon Woman's College 
Tulane University 
University of Illinois 
Northwestern University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of California 
University of Kansas 



University of Nebraska 
University of Texas 
West Virginia University 
University of Colorado 
Columbia University 
Dickenson College 
Colby College 

George Washington University 
Union University 
University of Tennessee 
University of Michigan 



178 



^lappa ^<ip|m (Sumatra 

Founded 1870 

COLORS -Light Blue and Dark Blue 
FLOWER— The Fleur-de-lis 



179 



Qtttt Jtpilxm Chapter 

Established Dec. 22, 1906 

SORORES IN URBE. 

MRS. [AMES MORELAND MRS. ADELAIDE GHURC1I 

AIRS LEANNA BROWN EVALYN SAGE BURNS 

LUCY WILSON 

SORORES IN FACULTATE. 

MARGARET BUCHANNON 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE. 



MAE SULLIVAN 
NELLS STEELE 



AGNES CADY 
PEARL REINER 
ELSIE KRAEMER 



1909. 

FL< >RA HAYES 

1910. 

MAHALA DORCAS PRICHARD 
ETHEL ICE 

1911. 

MYRTLE CHANEY 

MARJORIE BONNER PATTERSON 

PAULINE THEIKSON 

1912. 



ANNE WASHINGTON BROOKE SUSAN LOUISE SMITH 

EDNA ARNOLD 



180 



Jisll ni Acthw Chapters 



Boston University 
Barnard College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell College 
Syracuse University 
University of Illinois 
Swathmore College 
Alleghany College 
Buchtel College 
Wooster University 
Ohio State University 
University of Michigan 
Adrian College 
Hilldale College 
Tulane University 
University of California 

University 



West Virginia University 
Indiana State University 
De Pauw University 
Butler College 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Pennsylvania 
Northwestern University 
Illinois Wesleyan 
University of Minnesota 
Lowa State University 
Missouri State University 
Nebraska State University 
Kansas State University 
Colorado State University 
Texas State University 
Leland Stanford University 
of Washington 



182 



Oft times we go back in our dreams, to sit by 
the quiet peaceful Monongahela and to live 
again in student days, the best, the happiest 
hours of life. 




In Beauty, Honor, 

Nobility, Wisdom, 
She has reached a kind hand to our every endeavor 

So here in Youth, 
With hearts still free, 
Let us pledge one and all to return the favor ! 



■ZHO 



OFFICERS 

Head MARY MEEK ATKESON. 

Clerk VIRGINIA BRANSFORD NEAL. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



MARY MEEK ATKF.SON 
MAUI) FULCHER CALLIHAN 
LORENA LEE FRIES 
CLARA BELLE LYTLE 
MAE BERNICE SULLIVAN 
HELEN BLANCHE VANCE 
PAUL LUTHER MORROW 



ADA .MOON 

ADA MAY NEAL 

VIRGINIA BRANSFORD NEAL 

LILLIAN P.ALLARD SMITH 

MABEL STOUT 

LEO CARLIN 

HARRY LEWIS GRIFFIN- 



CYRUS BRIGGS VAN BIBBER 



188 



txx |Wtowlf driitr^hi 



Organized February 29, 1908. 

MOTTO: 

Gaeth a Wyrd Swa Hio Seel 
PURPOSE: 

(a) A knowledge of the epics and minor tales of all lands. 

(b) Practice and skill in oral story telling. 

(c) Social intercourse. 

MEETING PLACE 
Hrothgares Heal-Reed 

COLORS 

Fealwe — Orange and Lemon 

FLOWER 
The Daisy 

OFFICERS 

Se Foran-Sittend MISS MABEL STOUT. 

Se For Sittend MISS ADA MOON. 

Se Boc-Weard MISS HELEN BLANCHE VANCE. 

Se Hord-Weard MR. JACOB FRANCIS SHREVE. 

Se Micel Scop MISS LORENA LEE FRIES. 

Se Lytel Scop MISS CRYSTAL COURTNEY. 

Se Cwen Waes-Hal Folces MRS. J. HARRINGTON COX. 

MEMBERSHIP. 
Charter Members: 
MISS CRYSTAL COURTNEY MISS EMMA LAURA PARKS 

.MISS ADA MAY NEAL MISS HELEN BLANCHE VANCE 

Organization Members: 
Prof. ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG MISS CLARA BELLE LYTLE 
MISS EVELYN SAGE BURNS MISS ADA MOON 

Prof. JOHN HARRINGTON CON AIR. CLIFFORD MYERS 

MISS LORENA LEE FRIES MISS CLARS MAY REIN HIM MLR 

MISS FRANCES F. JACKSON MR. rACOB FRANCIS SHREVE 

MISS ETHEL ICE MISS MABEL STOUT 

MISS ETHEL BELLE JONES MR. HORACE LABAN WHITE 

183 



ffixtntttnitt ClxtJb 



Founded June 3, 1904. 

BROOKS HUTCHINSON, Summit 

CARL YOUNT, Guide 

H. KOELZ, Trail 

LEE HUTCHINSON, Cache 

L. W. RYAN, Echo. 

H. L. JONES, Pass. 

T. L. HARRIS, Trapper. 

R. O. HALL, Censor. 

P. P. REINER, Calumet. 

A. H. GRIGG, Ranger. 

L. S. BACKM AN, Woodman. 

A. K. SHELTON, Snake-Hunter. 



MOUNTAIN. 



BROOKS HUTCHINS< >\ : 
HERMAN KOELZ 
I.. W. RYAN 



CARL YOUNT 
LEE HUTCHINSON 
II. L. JONES 



T. L. HARRIS 



THE MARSH. 



R. 

I'. 
A. 
I.. 
A. 



O. HALL 
P. REINER 
II. GRIGG 
S. BACKMAN 
K. SHELTON 



\\. M. KENNEDY 



W. W. POINT, Jr. 
VAN McCREERY 
EARL PEARCY 

I. L. 1 1 AW KEY 

II. M. SCOTT 



President I ). B. PURINTi 'X 
Prof. C. II. PATTERS* >N 
Prof. S. C. SMITH 
Prof. TIM IS. E. HODGES 
Prof. J. M. CALLAHAN 

Prof. I-". I. 



ANCIENTS. 

C. I 



EM< )RY 
190 



I 'I'm!. C. I-.. HOGG 
Prof. I. K. GRANT 
Prof. R. I.. .MORRIS 
PAUL MARTI X 
PRED ELENNIKEN 








The Spfcl ii 



The Sphinx was founded at Ohio State University. This organization 
confines it membership to representative fraternity and degree men of the 
Senior class. The West Virginia chapter of the Sphinx was installed on 
the evening of March 9, 1909. 

One distinguishing feature of the Sphinx is "Link Day" which occurs 
in May of each year when the Juniors who are to compose The Sphinx for 
the ensuing year are publicly pledged. 

The membership is limited to fifteen. 

William Gail Hamilton, Wellsburg, West Virginia Diploma Law * K * 

John Layne Ilawley, Bluefield. West Virginia Diploma Law E N 

Edward Maywood Hinerman, Moundsville, West Va.. Diploma Law R e n 
Edward Fred Horstman, Wheeling, West Virginia, ... Diploma Law ° K - 

Brooks Swearengen Hutchinson, Fairmont, West Virginia \. 15. A T A 

Benjamin Bassel Jarvis, Clarksburg, West Virginia, ... Diploma Law - x 

Harry Lee Jones, Huntington, West Virginia Diploma Law 15 e n 

Benjamin Walter King, McMechen, West Virginia A. B. * - K 

Finney Lee Lakin, Terra Alta, West Virginia LL. B. * K - 

Charles Lively, Weston. West Virginia Bar Law - x 

John William Mason, Jr., Fairmont, West Virginia Y B. " N E 

French McCray, Fairmont, West Virginia, LL. B. 

Lacy Burke O'Neal, Fayetteville, West Virginia Diploma Law K A 

Andrew Kemper Shelton, Huntington, West Virginia, ... Diploma Law - N 
Hubert Earl Snyder, Hagerstown, Maryland B. S. C. E. A T A 

192 



€n$mtttm% ^xrreig ^11 



President, J. M. RUSSELL. 

Secretary, H. A. HOSKINS. 

Treasurer, L. P. HOLLO WAY. 

Critic, W. H. BOUGHTON. 

A. I). BELL I. C. HOSKJNSON 

W. II. BROUGHTON C. R. JOXES 

E. F. CHURCH ,\. M. LUCAS 

G. G. CREWSON CHARLES MOON 

T. w. CRAWFORD R. L. morris 

\\ . K. DICKENSON J. L. MORGAN 

1 ; . I- EMORY E. C. OLDHAM 

C V. FELLER I. M. RUSSELL 

T. \\. FITZGERALD A. R. ROSS 

() - I'- GIBBS ROLERTSON 

J. B. GRUMBEIN H. A. REYNOLDS 

J- W. HALL C. C. SHEPPARD 

J- B. IIEADLEV LLOYD SELBY 

L. I'. HOLLOWAY G. T. TWYFORD 

G. B. HARTLEY H. E. SCHNEIDER 

H. A. HOSKINS M. C. BURNSIDE 



194 




FdTHtR OB. 5er Hl\l~ Somt^Ktrv 1 'l ticklnv' »njj K«i*_ 



(Uthuuhmu Lrteimrg ^ttrtcf^ 



CHARLES G. BAKER 

\\ . ('.. CRICHTON 

3. \\ . CRADD( >CK 

I. B. DM. Wi >RTH 

I. F. E\ ERHART 

R. \\ . GAWTHRi )l' 

E. R. GROSE 

I. II. HUNDLEY 

HARRY A. KEAR 

[OHN NEWTON KEE 

!•". M. LIVEZEY 

GUY G. MEANS 

T. \ . MtCLURE 

CHR\ ST \l. a >1 RTNEY 

PRANK MARTIN P< >\\ HI.I 

PE \KI. IH >DGES 

HARRY WILBUR SHEETS 



Officers for the fall term, 1908. 

President, JAMES D. PARRIOTT. 

Vice President, HARRY W. SHEETS. 

Treasurer, CHARLES BAKER. 

Recording Secretary, MABEL STOUT. 

Corresponding Secretary, FRED KOELZ. 

Critic, J. T. SHREVE. 

Chorister, MARGARET HOPWOOD. 

Marshall, W. M. KENNEDY. 

Officers for the winter term, 1909. 

President, HARRY WILBUR SHEETS. 

Vice President, DONALD O. BLAGG. 

Treasurer, J. N. KEY. 

Recording Secretary, GRACE COX. 

Critic, FRANK MARTIN POWELL. 

Corresponding Secretary, ESTER KEMPER. 

Chorister, S. L. FRIEDMAN. 

Marshall, JAMES DAVIS PARRIOTT. 

VIRGINIA NEAL R. W. BORDER 

I. P. SHRIEVE DONALD O. BLAGG 

REPPA BELL L. S. BRITTEN 

W. II. STARBUCK |. C. EVANS 

CAM. DAVIS W. G. PAUST 

GLADYS WATERS II. L. GRIFFIN 

I. M. RUSSELL II. A. H( >SKINS 

A. B. LAMBDIN B. P. HAUGHT 

GRACE C( ).\ FRED KOELZ 

A. L. CORE C. K. KIM I' 

G. II. GENOE CULLEN G. MARTIN 

IRIAN BARNES HARRY McCAMIC 

MRE. URIAH HARM'S T. NUTTER 

MR. )NLEY IA.MKS I). PARRIOTT 

. W. T. ZINN REBECCA C< )RE 

HARY IK >PW< M )l) J. L. R< >BINS< >N 

I. \ . TH( )MI'S( )N MARGARET H( >PW< M )D 

198 



I'RICIIARD 



MABEL STOUT 
EARL I.. SHEETS 
ELIZABETH QUINN 
G. C. STARCHLR 
HELEN VANCE 
NELLIE WELTNER 
W. R. THACHER 
MAHALA 1). PR 
ESTER KEMRER 
II. WADE 
R. M. FRENCH 

S. I.. FRIEDMAN 
\\ . M. KENNEDY 
W. K. PRITT 
LORENA PRIES 
I W'K HOPWOOD 



m 



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GO 
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CO 



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H 
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to 

10 

w 



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in f 



200 



3V {forty? turn Uttr rarg J^ortrtg 



Fall Term. 

President, R. O. HALL, 

Vice President, H. G. WHEAT, 

Secretary FLORENCE JACKSON 

Critic, H. L. WHITE, 

Attorney, F. H. BRINKMAN, 

Chorister, NELLIE HENDERSON 

Marshall, P. R. MORROW 



OFFICERS 

Winter Term. 
H. A. REYNOLDS, 
CARRIE DAGUE, 
ETHEL PETERSON, 
P. R. MORROW, 
J. C. JONES, 
NELLIE HENDERSON, 
R. O. HALL, 



Spring Term. 
H. L. WHITE. 
BRUCE GRIMM. 
HELEN WIESTLING. 
W. E. CATHER. 
H. G. WHEAT. 
FLORA MONTGOMERY 
H. A. REYNOLDS. 



CARRIE DAGUE 
NELLIE HENDERSON 
MYRTLE CHANEY 
FLORENCE [ACKSON 
ETHEL PETERSON 
BELLE PROTZMAN 
CORA PILES 
B ESSIE RIED 
PEARL SCOTT 
GENIVIEVE STEALEY 
REN A TUTTLE 
\ [OLA WOLFE 
CARRIE TH( >RPE 
SI 'SAX SMITH 
I. G. ALLENDER 
P. II BRINKMAN 
' I. A. BARTLETT 



M E M B E R S 

W. ( ). CATHER 
R. M. CUEVAS 
C. B. VAN BIBBER 

I. C. VANCE 
J. C. [ONES 

II. G. CROGAN 
!•.. K. EVANS 

A. R. GR( >VES 
II. I.. WHITE 
K. E. YOUNG 

E. II. SCHNEIDER 
W. B. lOKDAX 

II. F. FLESHMAN 
Iv I.. MAXWELL 
II. II. KERR 
II. G. Will-. AT 

B. F. CLAYTON 



R. P.. FELGAR 

M. R. FITZGERALD 

F. I). GORBY 

M. C. GILCHRIST 

R. O. HALL 

I. L. HAWLEY 

I). C. KOERNER 

CHARLES LIVELY 

I. R. W. .MORRIS 
I'. R. MORROW 
R. O. PARRISH 
VERD PETERSON 
BOYD RANDALL 

II. A. REYNOLDS 
L. II. SANGER 

H. R. TOMPKINS 
BRUCE GRIMM 



202 




PRESENTS 

fifi M©SI ss 



COMMENCEMENT HALL 



Ifribctg (fitamttj, April 23, 1909 

STAGE FURNISHINGS BY HENNEN 
204 



moslhenlan Literary Seeleti 




iFFICERS 



FALL. 

President, R. H. GIST 

Vice President, R. M. MUSICK 

Secretary, MARL KEENAN 

Treasurer, W. E. SIMPSON 

Critic ALEX. MILLER 

Attorney, F. M. SMITH 

Marshall, J. K. GRUBB 



BUTCHER, J. G. L. 
BUTCHER, H. G. \Y 
CARNES, ALFRED 
DEEM, F. B. 
ELY, A. E. 
GROVES, A. R. 
GLOVER. J. F. 
GIST, R. H. 
HUEY, G. H. 
HENRY, S. A. 
IIELTZEN, J. G. L. 
HAMILTON. C. I >. 
G( )ULD, F. E. 
EVANS, R. W. 
GRUBB, J. K. 
KEENAN, MARL 
LAR AC LENTA, A. 
MILLER, ALEX. 



WINTER. 

R. M. MUSICK 

A. E. ELY 

W. E. SIMPSON 

G. E. TAYLOR 

C. D. HAMILTON 

F. B. DEEM 

R. H. GIST 



SPRING. 

A E ELY 
A. LARACUENTA 
J. M. SIGLER 
F. P. DEEM 
MARL KEENAN 
F. M. SMITH 
R. M. MUSICK 



R 



MILLER. J. L. 
MURPHY. F. E. 
MUSICK, R. M. 
NESTOR, C. W. 
RODABAUGH, D. A. 
ROGERS, H. L. 
SIGLER. J. M. 
SIMPS< »N, \Y. E. 
SMITH, F. M. 
SPEAR, E. B. 
SYDENSTRICKER. L. E 
TAYLOR, G. E. 
UPDIKE, E. H. 
COLE, L H. 
RICE. G. [. 
FREEMAN, W. B. 
PEASE, M. J. 
ASH, II. 

205 










OFFICERS 



FALL. 

President, H. H. BAUMGARTNER 

Vice President, E. L. COLCORD 

Secretary, A. T. CASTO 

Attorney, U. M. HEFLIN 

Critic, J. J. JENKINS 



WINTER. 
J. A. McRAE 
H. J. BEAUMONT 
J. J. JENKINS 
J. C. ALLEN 
H. H. BAUMGARTNER 



SPRING. 
K. H. GORMAN 
D. E. NEWTON 
H. C. RIGGS 
C. W. GRIFFITH 
H. A. WADE. 



ALLEN, |. C. 
BEAUMONT, II. J. 
BURRELL, L. G. 
CALVERT, C. II. 
C< >LLINS, V. C. 
COLCORD, E. L. 
CASLER, F G. 
COM lis. VV. E. 
COOMBS, F P. 
E< IRTNEY, II. G. 
G( ) R.MAX. K. II. 
GRIMM, II. \Y. 
U( >SKINS, S. P. 
IENKINS, I. I. 
KISLIG, CHA{5. 
LLEWELYN, I. S. 
McRAE, I. A 



MILLER, M. (). 

mitchell, i. b. 
Mcdonald, br< iwn 
moffat, b. ii. 
newton, i). e. 

PRICE, W. L. 
REPPERT, F G. 
RIGGS, II. C. 
SHRIVER, F. O. 
SMITH. F N. 
SNIDER, C. R. 
STEALY, I. r>. 
SYDENSTRICKER, C. R 
THOMPSON, IAS. 
WADE, W . A. 
WILLIAMS. EDGAR 
BAUMGARTNER, II. II. 



206 



«u 



, /"in" ^ ,v \ , 







r 



\ 



K. 



THI PATR ONS O F HUS 

;ga(tt)l||n '«'nfesa 



The order of Patrons of Husbandry was founded at 
Washington, I). C. on December 4th 1867. The word 
Grange is used much as other orders use the term lodge, 
and means a farm home. 

It is a secret fraternity composed of farmers and their 
families, and others "who have no interest in conflict with 
agriculture." 

It has seven degrees. The first four are conferred by 
the Subordinate Grange; the Fifth by the County ('.range ; 
the sixth In the State (.range and the Seventh by the 
National (.range. 

The West Virginia State ('.range was organized in 
October 1X72. The order is generally distributed through- 
out the State, and has a total national membership of one 
million. 

University Grange No. 372, was organized as Aurora 
Grange by the faculty and students of the College of Agri- 
culture, October 30, [899 and its name changed to Uni- 
versity Grange, April 28, [908. 

At the time of its organization it had but fourteen 
members, but such has been the growth of interest in agri- 
culture, and the organization itself that it now has a mem- 
bership of sixty; being one of the largesl organizations in 
the University. Ever since its organization it has been 
the literary, the social and the fraternal centre of the Agri- 




cultural College. It holds its sessions in the Ladies Parlor 
of Woodburn Hall. 

University Grange not only takes a very active interest 
in the affairs of the University, but in agricultural move- 
ments both State and National. 

Prof. T. C. Atkeson is Overseer of the National 
Grange, a member of the Legislative Committee of the 
National Grange, Master of the West Virginia State Grange 
and Treasurer of University Grange. L. W. Sheets is 
Lecturer of the West Virginia State Grange and Overseer 
of University Grange. G. C. Starcher is Chaplain of the 
West Virginia State Grange and Secretary of the local 
organization. J. B. Huyett and A. 1). Ellison, hold the 
positions of Steward and Assistant Steward of the State 
They are both graduates of the College of Agriculture, and 
C. E. Lewis a former student of the same college is over- 
seer of the State (".range. The strength of the Order in the 
state is largely due to the work done by the young men who 
have been members of, and received training in the organ- 
ization here. And no organization in the University is 
more earnestly and actively endeavoring to promote the 
interests for which it was organized. The Grange is an 
inseparable part of the College of Agriculture, and one will 
live just as long as the other. 



208 



OFFICERS OF UNIVIRSITY GRANC 



Master,. . 
Overseer, 

Lecturer, 
Steward,. 
Assistant 
Chaplain, 
Treasurer, 



A. B. BROOKS. 

E. W. SHEETS. 

A. W. NOLAN. 

H. S. VANDERVORT. 

Steward, J. E. DILLE. 

F. E. BROOKS. 

T. C. ATKESON. 



DR. D. B. 
Prof. T. C. 



Secretary, G. C. STARCHER. 

Gate Keeper, E. L. SWEARINGEN. 

Ceres, MRS. MYRTA NOLAN. 

Pomona, MRS. ETHEL PETERSON. 

Flora, MISS MARY ATKESON. 

Lady Assistant Steward, MISS LEDA ATKESON. 

Membership List of University Grange. 

PURINTON, President, West Va. University. MRS. CORDELIA ATKESON. 

ATKESON, Dean of the College of Agriculture. J. H. STEWART, Director the West Virginia Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 



Prof. HORACE ATWOOD 
Prof. D. W. WORKING 
MRS. D. W. WORKING 
Prof. A. W. NOLAX 
AIRS A. W. NOLAN 
Prof. W. M. MUNSON 
Prof. C. A. LEUDER 
AIRS. C. A. LEUDER 
Prof. A. L. DACY 
Prof. N. J. GIDDINGS 
MISS MARY M. ATKESON 
MISS LEDA C. ATKESON 
MR. VERD PETERSON 
MRS. ETHEL PETERSON 
MRS. S. B. BROWN 
DR. J. C. ELY 
DR. J. R. GLOVER 
MISS JESSIE GLOVER 
MISS JULIA GLOVER 
MISS ELLA RIFT 



MISS MARY ERAVEL 

F. P.. MAYER 

E. L. SWEARINGEN 

A. B. BROOKS 
FRED E. P. ROOKS 
C. W. TETER 

C. C. STARCHER 

E. W. SHEETS 

HARRY W. SHEETS 

DR. ARCHIBALD MOORE 

M. J. STOUT 

J. E. DILLE 

H. S. VANDERVORT 

NELSON ROBINSON 

M. A. JULL 

t. j. McCarthy 

O. G. WILSON 

B. C. KIGER 
P. W. POST 
L. C. YOUNG 



II. S. SYDENSTRICKER 
S. X. SWISHER 
C. C. II AR DM AX 
I). A. ARNOLD 
II. A. REYN( >LDS 
GUY C. MEANS 
ARTRUR TABLER 

E. A. BARTLETTE 
CHAS. ARXOLD 
PHIL WILLIAMS 
O. R. TAYLOR 

F. K. McCLURE 

A. V. WICHTERMAX 
R. AY MULDOON 
WILBER POST 
A. R. WILLIAMS 
VIRGIL VANDERVORT 
RUSSELL H. GIST 
S. E. SCOTT 



209 



\ 

L 



man's 




tz 



/( 



OFFICERS. 

President, FLORENCE JACKSON. 

Vice-President, ETHEL ICE. 

Recording Secretary, CLARA LYTLE. 

Corresponding Secretary, NELLIE HENDERSON. 

Treasurer, NELLE STEELE. 

WOMAN'S LEAGUE BOARD. 

NELLIE HENDERSON FLORENCE JACKSON 

CLARA LYTLE LILLIAN SMITH 

ETHEL ICE NELLE STEELE 

LOIS SIMMONS 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 
Faculty Members. 
MRS. D. BOARDMAN PURINTON MISS SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE. 
MRS. ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ MRS. MADISON STATHERS 

MRS. C. EDMUND NEIL 

ALUMNI MEMBERS. 

MISS ELEANOR MORELAND MISS MARGARET BUCHANNON 



211 








"W f \"v* **vv t w» ^ a 



^>3^^^s : M 



a Young Umis 1 Christian 
Aaaaalatlan off W. V. U . 




E. H. MUNSON, Gereral Secretary. 
Chairmen of Committees, 1908-09. 

Devotional, H. G. WHEAT. 

tible Study, j. j. JENKINS. 



Officers, 1909-10. 



Membership, G. T. TWYFORD. 

Mission Study, j. A. MacRAE. 

New Students, CHAS. G. BAKER. 

Lecture Course, H. L. GRIFFIN. 

Social, H. L. WHITE. 

Systematic Giving, M. C. BURNSIDE. 

Officers, 1908-9. 

President, W. M. BAUMGARTNER. 

Vice President, H. L. WHITE. 

Recording Secretary, G. T. TWYFORD. 

Corresponding Secretary, H. 



President, GLENN HUNTER. 

Vice President, VERD PETERSON. 

Secretary, G. T. TWYFORD 

Treasurer, G. B. VIEWEG. 



Treasurer, J. 



D. 
Y 



G. WHEAT. 
PARRIOTT. 



Chairman of Committees, 1909-10. 

Devotional, W. G. FAUST. 

Bible Study, VERD PETERSON. 

Membership, e. B. SPEER. 

Mission Study, , . j. a. MacRAE. 

Finance, G. B. VIEWEG. 

New Students, CHAS. G. BAKER. 

Social . FRED R. KOELZ. 

Extension, a. A. TORRENCE. 

Hand Book, w. W. POINT, Jr. 

Lecture Course, B. R. FITZGERALD. 



!•:. A. ALLEN 

\ ERD PETERSON 

II. II. BAUMGARTNER, 

II. W. SHEETS 

I. C. ALLEN 

\\ . M. BAUMGARTNER 



M, C. A, ENROLLMENT 

II. \Y. GRIMM 

A. R. GROVES 

L. V. THOMPS< >\ 

B. R. FITZGERALD 
L. G. BURRELL 

I. I.. ROBINS* >N 

212 



L. S. BRITTON 

C. R. S-NIDER 

I. A. MacRAE 

V A. TORRENCE 

P. V. SANDER 

I.Al'KKNCE LUELLEN 



F. R. KOELZ 

W. V. McNEMAR 
CLAY AMOS 
J. C. EVANS 
EDGAR SPEAR 
I. R. ECKMAN 
H. L. GRIFFIN 
CHARLES MOON 
W. R. THATCHER 
CLARENCE POST 

G. R. CLARK 

T. S. PATTERSON 
H. K. BURRELL 



G. G. CREWSON 

J. G. ALLENDER 

THOMAS FITZGERALD 

O. F. GIBBS 

H. M. SCOTT 

T. D. GORBY 

M. M. WATKINS 

C. C. PUGH 

C. G. MARTIN 

C. C. SHEPPARD 

T. H. BECKER 

G. G. 'MEANS 

J. C. VANCE 



E. P. McCOMBS 
L. H. WALKUP 
G. B. HARTLEY 
G. W. GROW 

L T. MORGAN 
H. L. WHITE 
J. D. PARRIOTT 
A. W. CHEZ 
S. H. SANGER 
G. E. RHODES 

F. H. BRINKHAM 
MARL KEENAN 
H. C. McCORMICK 



H. A. WADE 

I. C. rONES 

W. IT STAR BUCK 
T. W. STARBUCK 
W. E. SIMPSON 

II. H. KERR 
H. G. WHEAT 
J.J.JENKINS 

G. T. TWYF< )RD 
T. B. DIIAVORTH 
R. M. MUSICK 
R. S. RITZ 
ALBERT FELTON 




G. B. VIEWEG 

0. P. CHITWOOD 
A. M. REESE 

A. B. BROOKS 
H. C. KEAR 

1. C. FERRELL 
C. G. BAKER 

brown Mcdonald 

A. E. ELY 
P. R. MORROW 
E. F. HORSTMAN 
H. R. WILEY 
A. R. ROSS 



IT. C. RIGGS 
IT. P. TOMPKINS 
ROBERT FELGAR 
GEORGE GUNNOE 
G. C. STARCH ER 
W. PRICE 

A. B. LAMBDIN 
I. F. SHRIVE 
M. O. BOND 

M. C. BURNSIDE 
J. C. HOSKINSON 

B. R. CONRAD 
GUY BURNSIDE 



W. G. FAUST 
A. R. TABLER 

A. V. WICHTERMAN 
H. K. BROWN 

R. L. BUCHANAN 
C. B. VAN BIBBER 
W. E. CATHER 
H. H. WHITE 
II. A. REYNOLDS 
IT. T. ROGERS 
T. L. DUNKLE 

B. W. CRADDOCK 
T. C. 1TTZER 



I. X. KEE. Tr. 
R. H. GIST 
R. C. GROGG 
GLENN HUNTER 

II. F. FLESH MAN 
W. W. POINT, Ir. 
A. P. ARMSTRONG 
K. H. WEADEX 

F. F. COOPER 

F. M. SMITH 

F. W. STEELE 

II. I). POCOCK 

D. O. BLAGG 

J. E. B1LLINGSLEY 




WOMEN'S OHM 
ASSOCIATIO 




Officers, 1908-9. 

President, DORCAS PRICHARD. 

Vice-President, VIRGINIA NEAL. 

Recording Secretary, FLORENCE JACKSON. 

Corresponding Secretary, CLARA LYTLE. 

Treasurer, ANNA STURGIS. 

Officers, 1909-10. 

President, DORCAS PRICHARD. 

Vice-President, GENIVIEVE STEALEY. 

Recording Secretary, NELLIE HENDERSON. 

Corresponding Secretary,. ETHEL CRIM PETERSON. 
Treasurer, HELEN DeBERRY. 



216 



9 






i 






■5? 



I 

£ 









J 



* 



^ 



X 






213 



^tithxz ^lizkmtzm 



Established, November 23, 1908. 

COLORS 

Lalo, Bardroy, Butacole 

EMBLEM 
Cacabi 



FLOWER 
Brojuchi- 
CALLI. 



SENIORS. 

FRANCES F. rACKSON 
GERTRUDE R( >BERTS 
MABEL ST( >UT 

JUNIORS. 

EMILY I. WILM( )TM 
CLARA BELLE I.YTI.K 



SOPHOMORES. 



HELEN M. DeBERRY 
ESTHER JEAN GILMORE 
GENEVIEVE STEALEY 
HELEN M. WIESTLING 
STELLA REBECCA WILSON 

FRESHMEN. 

ETHEL EMMA FERGUSON 
MYRTLE CHANEY 
ALICE ENGLE 



220 



(Ike Iftesi Wixxpxcvm Wtsitimn (UlitJtr 



G. K. ALLMAN, President. 

MARGARET MOCKLER, Secretary. 

CHARLES LOUCHERY, Treasurer. 

MEMBERS 



G. K. ALLMAN 
E. A. BARTLETT 
L. S. BRITTON 
LEWIS CORK 
CECIL CRICKARD 
MISS JESSIE GLOVER 
MISS NANA GROSE 
MISS EMMA HARRIS 
MISS MABEL HODGES 
HAROLD HODGES 



II. A. HOSKINS 
BENJAMIN IARVLS 
F. L. LA KIN 
CHARLES LOUCHERY 
MISS BLANCHE LAZELLE 
MISS MARGARET MOCKLER 
TREVY NUTTER 
LA KIN ROBERTS 
II. \v. SHEETS 
lv W. SHEETS 



I. E. SHREVES 

MISS LOIS SIMMONS 

MRS. FRANK SMITH 

PR( )F.MADISON STATHERS 

MRS. .MADISON STATHERS 

MISS GEORGIA ST A ATS 

R. M. STEMPLE 

CLEOPHUS SWECKER 

PROF. F. B. TR< )TTER 

MRS. FRANK WEAVER 

MRS. ELLIS YOST 



222 



HAROLD PRESTON TOMPKINS, 'n . Editor-in-Chief. 
HORACE LABAN WHITE, 'io. . .Asst. Editor-in-Chief. 

VERD PETERSON, 'io Business Manager. 

ARTHUR MELVILLE JACOBS, 'io Athletics. 

JOHN CHRISTLER EVANS, 'io Organizations. 

FRANCES FLORENCE JACKSON, 'og Exchanges. 

ELEANOR VICTORIA STEELE, 'io Personals. 

HARRY W. SHEETS, '09 Locals. 



224 



MARY MEEK ATKESON, Editor-in-Chief. 

LORENA LEE FRIES, Asst.-Editor-in-Chief. 

PAUL MORROW, THOMAS GORBY, WILBUR E. 
CATHER, Associate Editors. 

EARL W. SHEETS, Business Manager. 



226 



MONTICOLA BOAR 



FRED R. KOELZ, Editor-in-Chief. 

HELEN B. VANCE, Asst. Editor-in-Chief. 

WALTER W. POINT, Jr., Business Manager. 

COMMITTEES. 



Literary. 

ILL. GRIFFIN 

M. DORCAS PRICHARD 

1. R. ECKMAN 

MRS. VERD PETERS< >N 



Athletics. 

]. R. ECKMAN 

J. E. BILLINGSLEY 



Faculty, Alumni, Calendar. 

ETHEL ICE 

B. M. SMITH 
J. G. ALLENDER 

Jokes, Write-ups. 

G. G. CREWSON 
CLARA B. I AT RI- 
CH AS. W. LOUCHERY 
J. G. ALLENDER 



Art. 

B. M. SMITH 
CLARA B. LYTLE 
ETHEL ICE 

Organizations. 

CH AS. \Y. LOUCHERY 
M. DORCAS PRICHARD 
G. G. CREWSON 



228 



c 



n-Hollenlo Dan©© Committee 




W. GAIL HAMILTON, President, * K * 

LEE HUTCHINSON, Secretary a T a 

BENJAMIN JAR VIS, Treasurer - X 

. CYRUS B. VANBIBBER, K A 

LEO CAR I. IX. ,{ e ii 

HAL M. SCOTT, - N 

M. C. BURNSIDES, - * K 

EARL I). WATS( )N, n k a 

HAROLD CUMMINS * K - 



230 



tudents Democratic Club 



President, CECIL L. CRICKARD. 

Secretary, CHARLES LIVELY. 

Vice Presidents, W. M. KENNEDY, JOHN HALL, W. 
W. POINT, Jr., BANTZ CRADDOCK, G. K. KUMP. 

Treasurer, C. E. PEDDICORD. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, DAVID CRONIN. 



ALLMAN, G. K. 
ALLMAN, E. F. 
ADKINS, A. W. 
BARTLETT, E. A. 
BOND, THOMAS O. 
BELL, A. D. 
BARTLETT, HOWARD 
BECKETT, R. P. 
BARNES, HUGH C. 
BULLARD, A. H. 
CARL1N, LEO 
CEUVAS, RAFAEL M. 
CRADDOCK, B. W. 
CRONIN, DAVID A. 
CURRY, MARION T. 
CRICKARD, CECIL L. 
CASLER, FRANK G 
CLAYTON, P.. F. 
DIFFENDALL, C. E. 
DEAKLEY, C. E. 
DONLEY, W. GUY 
DUNN, FRANK 
ECKMAN, J. R. 
ESTILL, DAVIS H. 
FITZGERALD, T. W. 
FELTON, ALBERT 
FRIEDMAN, S. L. 
FREEMAN, C. W. 



FELLER, CHAS. \V. 
FELGAR, R. P. 
FELKER, GUY G. 
FOREMAN, WEBER 
FLESH MAN, H. F. 
GAUTIER, CLAUDE V. 
GUTHRIE. J. K. 
GIBSON. JOHN L. Ir. 
GIBBS, (). F. 
GRIGG. ADRIAN H. 
GRAYSON. JOHN L. 
GAINES. C. G 
GLENN. G A. 
HENDERSON, JUSTIN 
HALL, JOHN W. 
H INKLE, I. L. 
UARLESS^ F. H. 
HOSKINS. HOMER A. 
HOG SETT. E. L. 
HALE. ROY (). 
HUNDLEY, R. A. 
HARRIS. G. H. 
JONES, HARRY 
JAR VIS, B. B. 
KEE, I. N. 
KURNER, DAVID C. 
KISL1G. CHAS. 
KOELZ, HERMAN C. 



KOELZ, FRED R. 
KUMP, G K. 
KENNEDY, W. M. 
LAIDLEY, W. S. 
LEMON, THOMAS 
LAMBD1N, ALLEN 
LOUGH, CHAS. M. 
LIVELY, CHARLES 
LITTLEPAGE, B. K. 
LOUGH, Wm. C. 
LAW, J. V. 

LUTTRELL, ERNEST L 
LEMLEY, G C. 
MORGAN, J. S. 
MARSTILLER, O. G 
McNEMAR. W. C. 
MORAN, I. II . 
MAXWELL. E. L. 
MORROW, P. R. 
MYERS, CLIFFORD, R. 
McCLURE, FRED K. 
McCULLOUGH. F. W. 
OLDHAM, EDWARD C. 
PEDDICORD, C. E. 
POINT, W. W. Jr. 
PEARCY, EARL 
POWELL, FRANK M. 
REYNOLDS, H. A. 



RAMEREZ, MANUEL MA. 

RUSSELL, J. M. 

RYMER, H. F. 

RHODES, GEO. E. 

REED, R. S. 

STANSBURY, HERBERT 

SAWTROPH, ROBERT 

SHREWSBURY 

SHREVE, J. F. 

SINCIND1VER. CARROLL T. 

STULTING, H. C. 

SEGER. WILBUR F. 

SCHNEIDER. E. H. 

SMITH, E. C. 

STOUT. M. 1. 

SHEETS. H. W. 

SHEETS. E. W. 

STEM PEE. R. M. 

SANGER, S. H. 

THOMPSON, L. V. 

TRACEY, C. E. 

WILEY, R. R. 

WHITE. H. L. 

WATSON, K. O. 

WEADON, K. H. 

YOUNG, LLOYD C. 

YOUNG, E. E. 

YOU N'T, C. C. 



231 



The Students' Republican Club of West Virginia Uni- 
versity was a political necessity. Great issues-national and 
state — were involved in the campaign last fall, and the 
public welfare demanded the success of the Republican 
candidates, the result that seemed impossible till this or- 
ganization was formed. 

It is a well known fact that the campaign opened with 
anything but bright prospects for the national Republican 
ticket. Mr. Bryan had advanced no new theories during 
the two or three months just prior to his nomination so 
the public was inclined to regard his candidacy with a 
dangerous degree of favor. This fact, and Mr. Taft's sup- 
posed hostility to the laboring classess, gave the Bryan 
boom a whirl-wind start. In West Virginia the situation 
was even more distressing. The party was divided and two 
Republican tickets — each claiming to be "regular" were 
nominated for state offices. To continue this division 
meant defeat. 

The Republican students of W. V. U. were the men 
who saw the danger and came to the rescue of the nation 
and state. This organization was formed. A. C. Weaver 
was elected president, J. I). Harriott vice-president, and 



Henry Eddy treasurer. Then the campaign began in 
earnest. 

Our first work was in our own state. "As goes West 
Virginia, so goes the nation" and we knew it. Our modesty 
forbids details, but our work was effective ; The factional 
candidates withdrew. We then cast about for a man who 
was good enough and strong enough to unite the divided 
party. We found such a man — a typical West Virginian — 
right in the shadow of the 'varsity. Hurrah for Glasscock! 

We need not recite our achievements in the several 
states nor in the nation at large. Suffice it to say that we 
wrote the great speechs of the campaign and Teddy's let- 
ters to Bryan that put Haskell out of business and started 
the wave that swept Mr. Taft to victory. 

So our record stands. And when the history of the 
campaign of 1008 is written, high on the roll of honor — 
far above the names of National and State committeemen— 
will stand the names of the loyal men of the Students' 
Republican Club of VV. V. I'., the organization that turned 
defeat into victory and gave our candidate'- the places the) 
occupy in the Mall of Fame. 



233 




Woman's Hall 




View of Campus 



Ailtbfe ^xmxb xti (Hxttttrxxl 



A* 



President, HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN. 

Secretary, DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS 

Treasurer, THOMAS EDWARD HODGES 

FACULTY MEMBERS. 
HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ 

THOMAS EDWARD HODGES DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS 

HARRY ANTHONY EATON 

STUDENT MEMBERS. 
1909. 
H. A. REYNOLDS C. V. FELLER 

191c. 
JOHN L. MOLLISON MAHALA DORCAS PRICHARD 

1911. 
MOSES STARKE DONNALY 



236 



April 



May 



I unc 



Llne»iip '©i 



Captain, T. J. McCARTHY. 

Graduate Manager, TOM FOULK. 

Catcher, McCARTHY. 

Pitcher, GORBY, GRIGG, GRAYSON. 

Shortstop, NEBINGER. 

ist. Base, BLAKE. 

2nd. Base, SHELTON. 

3rd. Base, LLEWELLYN, DOWNS. 

Left Field, CORE. 

Middle Field, RUPERT. 

Right Field, WILEY. 

SUBSTITUTES. 



I'.ULLARD 



VANDALE 



CROWN WELL 



MARTIN 



WILSON 



4 


W. 


1 1 


W. 


1 1 


w. 


'7 


w. 


2] 


w. 


23 


w. 


24 


w. 


25 


w. 


1 


w. 


1 


w. 


2 


w. 


9 


w. 


9 


w. 


[2 


w. 


t.«5 


w. 


[6 


w. 


29 


w. 


30 


w. 


30 


w. 


8 


w. 


10 


w. 


17 


w. 



At Home. 

V. U 23 Carnegie Tech o May 

V. U 11 California Normal 1 

V. U 5 California Normal o 

V. U 13 Bethany 4 June 

V. U 10 University of Cincinnati o 

V. U 7 University of Cincinnati 1 

V. U 4 Waynesburg College 2 

V. U 4 Waynesburg College 3 

V. U 18 W. U. P. o 

V. U 5 W. U. P 1 

V. U 10 Mannington 5 

V. I ' 14 Westminster College o 

V. U 1 Westminster College o 

V. U n Allegheny College 3 

V. U s W. & J o 

V. II m W. & J 4 

V. U 7 ( fherlin 2 

W U 10 Oberlin 2 

V. U 2 ( >berlin 1 

V. U 4 Pittsburg Collegians 2 

V. U o Pittsburg Collegians, 6 

V. U 5 All Stars I 

238 



BASEBALL RESULTS, '08. Abroad. 

21 W. V. U oV. M. I 

22 W. V. U 1 Georgetown, 

21 W. V. U oNavy 

3 W. V. U 5Dennison University 

4 W. V. U ioWooster 

5 W. V. U 7W. & I 

6 W. V. U 9W. & J 








n 



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1 ^1) 



Wi 



V*V 




Baseball Line-up for 5 09 

Captain, RICHARD NEBINGER. 

Graduate Manager, THOMAS B. FOULK. 

Student Manager, HALLECK M. SCOTT. 

First Base J. N. KEE, Jr. 

Second Base, KEMPER SHELTON. 

Third Base B. LEE HUTCHINSON. 

Short Stop, RICHARD NEBINGER. 

Left Field, FRED VANDALE. 

Middle Field T. R. McMINN 

Right Field, H. S. WILEY. 

Catcher, A. C. MERRIL. 

Pitchers, ADRIAN GRIGG, ROBT. BLAKE. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

First Base L. S. BACKMAN. 

Second Base, GUY FELKER. 

Right Field, E. M. HINERMAN. 

Catcher, L. L. WILSON. 

Pitchers, 

H. E. STANSBURY. HARMON, ARCH BULLARD. 



241 










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W.V.U. - U../P. 



WitH Her 
1 4- Tune 5|.ir,t 







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D 

H 

11 



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Cd.r.TtcK.tf 
_ P em , St 4 t £ /2 

- fldricttd. 

- U °/P>tt II 

- P,tt Lyceum 



V/ebt Vmjin>£t'«, Devoi LooKfi ror>,i(>abUTo Lverj ndver jdrv 



L 1 TlC-uf> 

C- Pi tree. 
l..C--&Athm<l» 
kT -?n e /nt«re 

CLE" /y ino-nian 
Rft-DilwortH. 

^p-SneUon 
t_ fj-fle.bivT^tr 

«t-rtuiininjo». 




BALL 'C 




The baseball season of nineteen hundred and eight was, 
without doubt, the most remarkable in the history of the 
University. Our baseball team was a record-breaker not 
only for West Virginia University, but also for the other 
colleges and universities. Of the twenty-nine games play- 
ed West Virginia won all but five, four of these having 
been lost away from home and only one, on the home 
grounds. From the beginning of the season the deter- 
mined representatives of the Old Gold and Blue pushed 
steadily forward with one victory after another until they 
had won sixteen successive games and piled up one-hundred 
and fifty-two points to their opponents twenty-four. That 
they lost on their eastern trip to V. M. I., Georgetown, and 
the Navy, we fully realize and regret, but, carefully con- 
sidering the long-reputed strength of these opponents and 
the difficulties met with by our men, we are far from being 
dissatisfied. By some mysterious unexpected turn of fate, 
Dennison defeated the varsity by a single score. When the 
Pittsburg Collegians played their second game at Morgan- 
town, they led the Old Gold and Blue to defeat in an inter- 
esting: and well-earned game. This <;ame with the Coll- 



egians was the first and only game lost on the home dia- 
mond by our men. Every other game from this time on 
to the end of the season was won by West Virginia. 

When we look back over the record of last spring's 
baseball playing, we should consider that West Virginia 
accomplished something extraordinary in the baseball 
world. By her almost incessant winning and her exhibi- 
tion of high-class baseball she inevitably attracted the 
attention of a greater part of the sporting world. That 
■lie was very successful is at once admitted. However, 
her success is to be attributed not to mere chance and luck, 
but to the general existing conditions at the University 
last spring. In the first place, our efficient graduate man- 
ager pushed things along as fast as lie could and arranged 
a good schedule. This fact naturally aroused the interest 
of all baseball players in school, and, at length, drew out 
excellent material. By constant and presevering practice 
a fast team was finally developed. Since the first few games 
were won by West Virginia by very large scores, the stu- 
dents began to turn to the diamond with marked interest. 
As the season went on and victory still continued for the 



245 



Old Gold and Blue, everybody soon became wildly enthus- 
iastic over the success of the team. Consequently, the 
games were well attended and the players encouraged and 
supported by the students. 

"Burly" McCarthy, last spring's captain, handled his 
team ably and played his position behind the bat as few 



ethers do. Although .McCarthy is now graduated and no 
longer to be seen in his old position, we feel confident that 
the place will be well rilled by catcher .Merrill from Vale. 
With most of last year's men back again this year, there is 
no doubt that the season of nineteen hundred and nine may 
equal or even surpass that of nineteen hundred and eight. 




246 










OHBDULI off ntATMtMTY 



- 



LL LEAGUE 




Wednesday, April 21, 6 p. m. — Beta Theta Pi vs. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 

Thursday, April 22, 6 p. m. — Sigma Nu vs. Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Saturday, April 24th, 9 a. m. — Kappa Alpha vs. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 

Saturday, April 24, 10:30— Sigma Chi vs. Phi Kappa Psi. 
Monday, April 26, 6 p. m. — Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Delta Tau 
Delta. ' 

Tuesday, April 2~, 3:30 p. m. — Phi Sigma Kappa vs. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

Tuesday, April 27, 6 p. m. — Sigma Chi vs. Kappa Alpha. 

Wednesday, April 28, 3:30 p. m. — Sigma Nu vs. Phi 
Kappa Psi. 

Wednesday, April 28, 6 p. m. — Phi Kappa Sigma vs. 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Thursday, April 29, 3:30 p. m. — Delta Tau Delta vs. 
Sigma Chi. 

Thursday, April 29, 6 p. m. — Kappa Alpha vs. Phi 
Kappa Psi. 

Friday, April 30, 2 p. m. — Beta Theta Pi vs. Sigma Nu. 
Friday, April 30, 6 p. m. — Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 



Saturday, May 1, 10:30 a. m. — Delta Tau Delta vs. Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Monday, May 3, 6 p. m. — Phi Kappa Sigma vs. 
Phi Kappa Psi. 

Tuesday, May 4, 6 p. m. — Beta Theta Pi vs. Sigma Chi. 

Wednesday, May 5, 6 p. m. — Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. 
Phi Kappa Psi. 

Thursday, May 6, 6 p. m. — Kappa Alpha vs. Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa. 

Tuesdav, May 11, 1 p. m. — Raj. )a Alpha vs. Delta Tau 
Delta. 

Tuesday, May 11, 6 p. m. — Sigma Chi vs. Sigma Nu. 

Thursdav. May 1 }. 6 p. m. — Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Beta 
Theta Pi. 

Monday, May 17, 6 p. m. — Beta Theta Pi. vs. Kappa 
Alpha. 

Tuesday, May 18, 6 p. m.— Delta Tau Delta vs. Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 

Thursday. May 20. 6 p. m. — Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Phi 
Kappa Psi. 

Friday, May 21, 3:30 p. m. — Kappa Alpha vs. S ; gm,i 
Nu. 



247 



Saturday. May 22, 9 a. m. — Beta Theta Pi vs. Delta Tau 
Delta. 

Saturday. May 22. 10:30 a. m.— Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. 
Sigma Chi. 

-M.mday. May 24. 6 p. m.— Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Kappa 
Alpha. 

Tuesday. May 2?. 6 p. m.— Sigma Nu vs. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon. 

Monday, May 31, 6 p. m.— Phi Kappa Sigma vs. Sigma 
Chi. 

Tuesday. June 1, 6 p. m.— Beta Theta Pi. vs. Phi 
Kappa Psi. 



Friday, June 4, 3:30 p. m.— Sigma Chi vs. Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

Saturday, June 5, 10:30 a. m.— Sigma Xu vs. Delta Tau 
Delta. 

Saturday, June 5 — Afternoon open. 

Wednesday. June 9, 6 p. in.— Phi Kappa Sigma vs 
Beta Theta Pi. 

Thursday. June 10, 6 p. m.— Phi Kappa Psi vs. Delta 
Tau Delta. 



Sigma 



Friday, June 11. 6 p. m. — Sigma Xu vs. Phi K 



appa 




24 8 



, 



wff% 




**» 



lis: 



Hi 

if 



■ 



H: 





if 














249 



r 



( Foot Ball Line- up 




Captain, MONT McINTlRE. 

Coach LUEDER (CORNELL) 

Graduate Manager THOS. B. FOULK. 

Student Manager \V. E. SNYDER. 

Centre PIERCE. 

Left Guard HAWLEY. 

Left Tackle CORE. 

Left End L HUTCHINSON. 

Right Guard DI L WORTH. 

Right Tackle McINTlRE. 

Right End YOUNT, HINERMAN. 

( juarterback SH ELTON. 

L. Halfback YOUNG. 

R. ! [alfback NEBINGER. 

Fullback DIFFENDAL. 



PEARCY 
GRAYSON 

SWEARINGEN 



SUBSTITUTES. 



McCRAY 



WILEY 
COLE 

WHITE 



Sept. 26 at Philadelphia— U. of P 

Oct. 17 at 1'ittsburg — Carnegie Tech o 

( )ct. 24 at State College, Pa. — IVnn State [2 

( )ct. 3] at Parkersburg — .Marietta o 

Nov. 7, at Pittsburg — University of Pittsburg. . n 
Nov. 14 at Morgantown — Pittsburg Lyceum .. 
Nov. 21 at Morgantown — Bethany o 

259 



(» Y . V. U. o 



W. Y. U. 

W. V. u. 

w. \ . u. 

w. v r. 

w. v. u. 

W. V. u. 



16 

o 

12 

o 

4 
47 




THE W.V.: U. — U. ©I P a FOOT- 
BALL illl 




FROM THE PHILADELPHIA RECORD SEPT. 27. 1908. 



"The University of Pennsylvania football team opened 
the season in a none too auspicious manner yesterday by 
beating West Virginia by the small score of 6 to o. The 
Southerners played Penn to a standstill in the first half, 
and it was not until i i of the 15 minutes of the second half 
were over that the Red and I due eleven managed to shove 
Mainer over for the touchdown that saved the disgrace of 
a tie game as a .-tarter. The West Virginia team was com- 
posed of strapping big fellows, who fought desperately for 
every inch of -round. Try as they would the Pennsylvania 
hacks could not consistently advance the ball, and as long 
as the play was confined to straight football tactics one 
team was as good as the other. 
* * * * * * * * * 

In the first half Pennsylvania never even threatened to 
score, while at one time West Virginia looked very danger- 
ous as the result of a fumbled punt of I lollenback. 

At the start I lollenback kicked off 30 yards to Mclntire, 
who fumbled, and Dietrich fell on the ball on the 40-yard 
line. "Big Bill" then circled right end for a gain of 20 



yards and things looked very propitious for the Red and 
and Blue. Keinath and Hollenback successively failed to 
gain, however, and the ball was given to West Virginia 
when a Red and Blue player was detected holding. From 
this time on it was a see-saw match until near the end 
of the half, neither team being able to gain much ground. 
Nebinger and Hollenback punted repeatedly, but neither 
side gained appreciably by the exchange. Nebinger finally 
sent a long, low punt, which Hollenback could not hold, and 
the ball rolled over Penn's goal line. "Big Bill" recovered 
it and ran the ball out to the 10-yard mark, preventing a 
safety. A 15-yard penalty for holding brought the ball 
out from the danger point, and for the remainder of the 
half the ball see-sawed. 
* * * * * * * * * * 

The game was not so disappointing from a Penns\] 
\ania standpoint as might be imagined from the score. 
Several of the new men showed up very well, and the 
trouble was not so much with the individuals as with the 
team play. Marks and Cozzcns played splendidly, not 



252 



only doing well in the line, but tackling fiercely in the open. 
Manier did good work behind the line, hitting the line hard 
and interfering in fine style. Keinath and Hollenback were 
the real stars of the game. The little quarter-back executed 
his three forward passes perfectly and made several splen- 



did end runs, besides running the team in a headly manner. 
"Big Bill" ran well with the ball and proved a tower of 
strength on the defense. For the West Virginians, the 
stars were Diffendal, Mclntire and Pierce, while the whole 
team deserves credit for their plucky fight." 



THE LINE-UP 

Pennsylvania. Positions. West Virginia. 

BRADDOCK (MILLER) Left End HUTCHINSON. 

GASTON Left Tackle B ACHM AN. 

DIETRICH Left Guard HAWLEY. 

MARKS Center PIERCE. 

PIKE Right Guard. DILWORTH. 

COZZENS Right Tackle McINTIRE. 

SCARLETT Right End YOUNT. 

KEINATH Quarter-back SHELTON. 

MANIER Left Halfback HESS. 

TOWNSEND Right Halfback NEBINGER. 

HOLLENBACK Full-back DIFFENDAL. 

Touchdown — Manier. Goal — Scarlet. Referee — Sharpe, of Yale. 
Umpire — Edwards, of Princeton. Field Judge — Corbin, of Yale. 
Linesman — Sheble, of Pennsylvania. Time of halves — 15 minutes. 




253 




H0MORE FOOTBALL LINE-UP 

W. B. CROWL Captain, 

WARD SPENCER Manager, 

DONALLY, Left End. 

BEST, Left Tackle. 

BARTLETT, Left Guard. 

AMOS, Center. 

FLOERCKY Right Guard. 

BLUM, Right Tackle. 

RIDDLE, Right End. 

CROWL, Quarterback. 

PILES, Left Halfback. 

C. B. WILSON, Right Halfback. 

L. L. WILSON, Fullback. 

25 1 




* c 

FRIiHMAN FOOTBALL LINE-UP 

H. P. TOMPKINS Captain, 

GUY G. MEANS Manager 

PUGH, Left End. 

TOMPKINS, Left Tackle. 

GUNNOE, Left Guard. 

PICKARD, Center 

WATKINS, Right End. 

STURGISS, Right Tackle. 

CRICHTON, Right Guard. 

SPEARS, BLAIR, Quarterback. . 

BELL, Right Halfback. 

McVEY, Left Halfback. 

SPEER, Fullback. 

SUBSTITUTES. 
TREGELLAS RILEY. 

255 




What makes the " Tiger " laugh and roar ? 
Her baseball rivals are vanquished once more. 



256 




JUNIOR BASKETBALL TEAM LINE-UP 

Ca P tain . J. E. BILLINGSLEY. 

Manager, D. H. KAHN. 

GOULD, Forward. 

ECKMAN Forward 

MORGAN Center 

P° INT Guard. 

BILLINGSLEY, ESTILL, Guard. 

258 




SOPHOMORE BASKET BALL LINE-UP 

J. H. RIDDLE Captain, 

W. B. PILES Manager 

RIDDLE, Forward. 

POCOCK, T. STARBUCK, Forward. 

FLORECKY, BAKER, Center. 

RYAN, Guard. 

CROWL, Guard. 

259 




Wearers off til* §i W- ¥ E S 





FOOT BALL 

B. S. HUTCHINSON 

B. I.. HUTCHINSON 
EARLE PE VRCY 

I.. \\ . RYAN 
I.. S. BACKMAN 
RICHARD NEBINGER 
JOHN I.. HAWLEY 
KEMPER SHELTON 
ARCH BULLARD 
JOHN I.. CORE 
EDGAR M. HINERMAN 
A. CRAIG PIERCE 

C. E. DIFFENDAL 



BASKETBALL. 

EARLE PEARCY 
P. P. REINER 
L. \Y. RYAN 
RICHARD NEBINGER 
H. E. FL< >ERCKY 
VAX McCREERY 
CI IAS. SMITH 
SHELBY TAYL( >R 



TRACK. 

EARLE PEARCY 
R. M. GAWTHROP 
J. L. GRAYSON 



BASE BALL. 

T. D. G< >RBY 
II. R. WILEY 
ROBERT BLAKE 
KEMPER SHELTON 
RICHARD NEBINGER 
JOHN L. C( >RE 
FRED VANDALE 
J. L. GRAYSON 
ADRIAN" GRIGO 



260 




Final Standing of ih® Fratomit 
Bowling Teams 



-Cb 



~? 



Won 

Sigma Nu 20 

Sigma Chi 18 

Phi Sigma Kappa 15 

Phi Kappa Psi 13 

Delta Tau Delta 13 

Phi Kappa Sigma 11 

Pi Kappa Alpha 10 

Beta Theta Pi 7 

Kappa Psi 1 



Lost 


Percent- 


4 


•833 


6 


•/So 


9 


.625 


ir 


■54i 


11 


•54i 


13 


•458 


14 


.417 


1/ 


.291 


23 


• 4^ 



2G1 



THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH u, 1909, EIGHT O'CLOCK. 



AXTIK >.\Y VV. CHEZ, Director of Physical Training and Athletics 

MRS. A. W. CHEZ, Director of Women. 

R. L. COLE, Student Assistant, Men's Department 

MISS REBECCA CORE, Student Assistant, Women's Depart- 
ment. 

MRS. FRED C. FLENNIKEN,Accompanist, Women's Depart- 
ment. 

LEADER OF SQUADS AND GYMNASTIC TEAM. 
R. L. COLE, II. A. IK (SKINS. G. W. GROW, H. POCOCK, J. 
I'.. STEALEY, C. NESTOR, W. I-:. CATHER, ARCH ARM- 
STRONG, E. L. SWEARINGEN, C. M. LOUGH, W. W. POINT 
Jr., C. MARTIN, F. SANDER, F. McCRAY, W. H. STARBUCK, 
C. M. HUEY, A. MILLER, T. G< )RBY. 

PROGRAM. 

1. CALISTHENIC MARCH, Classes of Women's Department. 

2. PARALLEL BARS. 

Squad and Advanced Work. 
MEMBERS <)!-' GYMNASTIC TEAM. 

3. CHILDREN'S CLASS. 

MRS. A. W. CHEZ, Director. 

4. FLYING RINGS, Members of Gymnastic Team. 

TW< l STEP, "The King's Fool," by Cadel Hand. 

5. GAMES. 

lai Nimble Jill. MISSES' CLASS. 
(b) kcla\ Race, GIRLS' CLASS. 



6. CADET CLASS. 

A. W. CHEZ. Director. 
Illustrating Briefly a 7 pical Day's Lesson in the Gymnasium. 
RUNN, sG TO FOOT-MARKS. 
GAL( >P Fire Alarm." by CADET LAND. 
Body Building Exercise: Squad Work on Apparatus Under Di- 
rection of Leaders; Games. 

7. FIGURE MARCHINC 

Members of Young Women's and Misses' Classes. 
MRS. A. A. CHEZ, Director. 

8. HORSE AND BUCK, by Gymnastic Team. 

MEDLEY WALTZ, by Cadet Band. 

9. FLAG DRILL, Girls' Class. 

MRS. A. W. CHEZ. Director. 

10. FENCING, BOXING WRESTLING. 

Showing Some of the Daily Free-for-all Work in the Classes. 

11. SWEDISH FOLK DANCES, in National Costume. 

Given by request. 
.National Dances of Sweden, in which on Festive Occassions, Old 
and Young Engage, and Which Portray the Characteristic 
Vigor of tie Nation, 
(a) ostgotapolska. 
(h) Vafva Vadmal, (Weaving Dance.) 

MEMBERS OF YOUNG WOMEN'S CLASS. 
Under Direction of MRS. CHEZ. 

12. TUMBLING AND PYRAMIDS, Members of Gymnastic 

Team. 



262 



gfeelfc ast* £fcrff 



Field and Staff. 
HARRY A. EATON, Captain 23d U. S. Infantry, Comdt. 

ROY O. HALL, Cadet Major. 

JOHN C. EVANS, 1st Lieutenant Adjutant. 

GEORGE W. GROW 1st Lieutenant Quartermaster. 

HALLECK M. SCOTT,. . Cadet Captain and Drum Major. 
Non-Commissioned Staff. 

THOMAS L. HARRIS, Sergeant Major. 

CARL R. SYDENSTRICKER,. . .Quartermaster Sergeant. 

HOMER A. HOSKINS, Ordnance Sergeant. 

ENOCH SMITH, Chief Trumpeter. 



266 



p BAND S 



i 



WALTER A. MESTREZAT, Chief Musician. 

T. CLYDE PITZER, Principal Musician. 



SERGEANTS. 



DAVID A. CRONIN 
FRED B. MAYER 



GEORGE E. 
GEORGE G. 



BROWNWELL 
CREW SON 



CORPORALS. 



WARD H. SPENCER 
ARTHUR A. P.RINDLEY 
LEROY P. HOLLOWAY 
JULIUS HEFKE 

HARRY 



L. 



PAUL RIDER 
VORHEES C. COLLINS 
ALEXANDER D. HELL 
HARRY W. SHEETS 
STILPHIN 



PRIVATES. 

BENNETT, CLYDE M. 
BRADLEY, WALTER B. 
CASLER, FRANK G. 
DEAN, WILLIS E. 
EVERHART, FRANK L. 
McDANIELS, FORREST M. 

WILHELM 



MILLER, MOSES O. 
MOFFATT, BENJAMIN H. 
REYNOLDS, HARRIS A. 
SHEPPARD, CREEDY C. 
SPERLING, HARRY E. 
STARBUCK, THEODORE 
DON L. 



\\ 



268 




tompaiiy A 





Captain, OSCAR F. GIBBS. 

ist Lieutenant, BOYD RANDALL. 

2d Lieutenant, WALTER W. POINT, Jr. 

ist Sergeant, HARRY G. WHEAT. 

SERGEANTS. 

LAWRENCE E. SYDENSTRICKER WILLIAM E. SIMPSON- 

EUGENE L. COLCORD GUY G. MEANS 

CORPORALS. 
WILBUR E. GATHER ARTHUR R. ROSS 

RUFUS M. MUSICK ROBERT W. EVANS 

MUSICIAN. 

HOWARD C. BROWN 

PRIVATES. 

ALLEN. JAMES C. GROGG, ROBERT C. SANGER, SAMUEL H. 

BERNSTEIN, LEONARD J. GUTHRIE, [AMES K. SATTERFIELD, RUSSELL L. 

BURNSIDES, GUY II. HARLESS, LLOYD II. SCOTT, GEORGE V. 

BURRELL, LEWIS G KING, HARRY W. SHORES. HENRY G. 

DAVIDSON, JOHN \\ . LAMBDIN, ALLEN B. SMITH, FRENCH N. 

EVANS, EUGENE E LEMEN, THOMAS T. SNIDER, CLIFFORD R. 

FELTON ALBERT MEADOWS, HOMER L. SWEARINGEN, EDWIN L. 

i:icii..-|. Vim'tmy n w POOL, CLARK L. TAB LER, ARTHUR R. 

.7/.;:/ / , ' , REPPART, ERED W. WATKINS, HIFFIN N. 

ULUVEK, WILLIAM II. RILEY, FRANK H. WILLIAMS, JOSEPH A. 

GORMAN, KARL II. SALISBURY, JAMES N. YOUNG. FLOYD C. 

270 




Company 1 








Captain, HUGH C. BARNES. 

ist Lieutenant, DAVIS H. ESTILL. 

2d Lieutenant, CLAUDE S. TETRICK. 

ist Sergeant CHARLES G. BAKER. 

SERGEANTS. 
HARRY S. SYDENSTRICKER N'EAL M. HEFLIN 

HARMAN II. KERR JAMES C. JONES 

CORPORALS. 

[ESSE I JENKINS [ACKSON McCOY 

JOHN L. ROBINSON 

MUSICIAN. 
JACKSON VAN B. HI. AIR 

PRIVATES. 

BARBE, VICTOR HELTZEN, JOHN G. RADAUBAUGH, DAVID A. 

BROMLEY, EDGAR D. HOSKINS, STEPHEN PAUL RIGGS, HOWARD C. 

BUTCHER, [ESSE G. S. KIRK. JOSE A. SANDER, FRANK V. 

BUTCHER, HAZEL, G. W. KURNER, DAVID C. SHEETS, EARL W. 

COOMBS, FOREST P. LEWELLEN, LAWRENCE S. SHRIVER, HERSCHEL L. 

COOPER FRANCIS F WILLIAMS, PHILLIPP STARBUCK, WILLIAM II. 

CRAWFORD THftMAS W McDONALD, BROWN STUM P. GEORGE A. 

■ .-. v rv ,,, m , MILAN. WILLIAM II. TAYLOR. MARVIN L. 

PUK1XNHY, in (.M <• PEARSON, FRANK R. TOMPKINS. HOWARD P. 

GROVES, ARTEE R. POWELL, CLAYTON M. WADE. HORACE A. 

HAGER, IRA P. PUGH, CLYDE C. ZINN, WAITMAN F. 

272 







IN HERS ot COLLIDE PRIZE 
lor lis Yoar 1007-8 




THE BRYAN PRIZE, S15.00 

For the best essay on Protection for Workmen JOSEPH COCHRAN VANCE, Sophomore, Morgantown 

THE TAX COMMISSION PRIZE, S7C 



For the best discussion of Section 1, Article X, of the Constitution of West Virginia 

WILLIAM MICHAEL KENNEDY, Senior, Fairmont 

THE JAMES F. THOMPSON PRIZE, S25.00 



For the best work in Anatomy for three quarters- 



SILAS CLEVELAND UNDERWOOD, Fresh. Med., Wellsburg 

THE RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS PRIZi, $50.00 

For the best thesis in the C. E. or M. E. school on the Needs and Resources of West Virginia 

JOHN DANA McNUTT, Senior C. E., Sutton 



278 




The Circle 




The Library 




Elementary Agriculture Class 




Martin Hall 




The Campus 




Fraternity Row 




Heating Plant 




Birdseye View of Athletic Field 




Woodburn Hall 




Science Hall 




•^ — 5^5 



HOW THE GIRAFFE GOT HIS LONG, LONG NECK 




First Prize Story — Marjorie Bormer Patterson. 



Far. away in the Kilalooloo desert, there lived, ages 
and ages ago, a little giraffe. Now you must know, Dear 
Heart, that all the giraffes in that age had very short necks, 
so this little giraffe had a very short neck, too. 

His name was Khan Abu, and you mustn't ask me 
what Khan Abu means, for it's Bagdad talk and nobody 
knows what it means. Well, this giraffe, wdiose name was 
Khan Abu was a most disdainful giraffe. His papa and 
his mamma ate the prickly, tickly cactus plants that grew 
on the Kilalooloo desert, but Khan Abu, who was most dis- 
dainful, wouldn't eat the prickly, tickly cactus plants. He 
told his mamma that he wouldn't eat anything but the 
luscious, juicy fruit that grew on the very tip-top of the 
umbrella palm tree. His papa and his mamma scolded 
him and spanked him, and spanked him and scolded him, 
but they couldn't make him eat the prickly, tickly plants. 

Then, one day when he was sitting under the umbrella 
palm tree, looking up at the luscious, juicy fruit on the very 
tip-top branch, Mr. Lion came along. ( )rdinarily, Mr. Lion 
would have eaten Khan Abu, but since he had just eaten 
his dinner, he felt sorry for the poor little giraffe, who was 
most disdainful and wouldn't eat the prickly, tickly cactus 
plants. So Mr. Lion said in a real deep voice, like this: 
"Would you give me some of that luscious, juicy fruit if I 
put you up in the very tip-top of the umbrella palm tree?" 
Then Khan Abu answered in a real high voice, like this: 
"If you'll put me up there I'll give you a lot of that luscious 
juicy fruit." Then Mr. Lion told Khan Abu to wait a 
little while, and he walked away across the Kilalooloo 
desert. 

Khan Abu stood up and waited and waited and waited 
and waited. Then he sat down and waited and waited and 
waited and waited, and finally he saw Mr. Lion and the 



Kangaroo and the zebra and the rhinoceros and the ele- 
phant coming across the Kilalooloo desert. When they 
came near Khan Abu, Mr. Lion said in a real deep voice, 
like this: "Now, in just about one minute and six and one- 
half seconds, standard time, you'll be up in the very tip-top 
of the umbrella palm tree." 

Then Mr. Lion made Khan Abu stand on the ganga- 
roo's back, and Khan Abu and the kangaroo stand on the 
zebra's back, and Khan Abu and the kangaroo and the 
zebra stand on the rhinoceros's back, and Khan Abu and 
the kangaroo and the zebra and the rhinoceros stand on 
the elephant's back. Then Khan Abu could just reach the 
luscious, juicy fruit, that grew on the very tip-top of the 
umbrella palm tree. Just as quick as he could, he bit off 
a large piece of the luscious, juicy fruit and chewed it with 
his mouth open, which is most contrary to etiquette. Mr. 
Lion, who was watching him became very cross when he 
saw Khan Abu eat the luscious, juicy fruit, for the giraffe 
had promised to give Mr. Lion some. Then Khan Abu 
again bit into the luscious, juicy fruit without pulling it off 
of the tree. Now Mr. Lion who was most "strordinarily" 
angry, pulled the elephant out from under the rhinoceros 
and the zebra and the kangaroo and Khan Abu, and all the 
animals fell down but Khan Abu, who was so very hungry 
that he hung with his teeth to that luscious, juicy fruit. 

You see, Dear Heart, there he was high up in the very 
tip-top of the umbrella palm tree, and his feet weren't 
anywhere near the ground. So his neck began to stretch 
just like a rubber, and it stretched and stretched till his 
little feet were right on the ground and his head was high 
up in the very tip-top of the umbrella palm tree. 

And that is why, Dear Heart, all giraffes nowadays 
have such long, long necks. 



291 




*A In The Open Field <^ 





_*» 



( )h, what a sting to the inner self, 

A thrust to the struggling heart, 
To acknowledge defeat in the trying race 

Of living the ideal part. 

Often Hope thrusts out a helping hand 

And life shows its brighter side; 
But all is in vain when we see the near goal 

Disappear in the swift eventide. 

Mow sweet the temptation to fall by the way 
And mourn the lost hopes that seem dead, 

Hut oli how refreshing the gleam one again, 
When the darkness has gathered and fled. 

To do what he can is best after all 

For the one who is doomed to despair; 

For the prize that is sought can he only attained 
When Eternity shoulders our care. 



292 



CONQUERED BY FIRE 




Second Prize Story — by Ethel Crim Peterson. 



"Clear out of her. I won't hev it. D'you think I'm 
goin' to let my Hattie marry a man who hezen't nary a 
red cent to his name. Wy I'd be a fool an' ye know it, 
John Laurence. Ye con't hev her an that settles it. 
Clear out." 

Old Jacob Southern brought out the last words 
almost with a shout. He glared 
out from under his bushy eyebrows 
at the young man before him and 
brought down his cane with a re- 
souding thud on the ground. As 
tie sat in his arm-chair leaning his 
humped back against the old brown 
sheep-skin which covered the chair 
he would have frightened away 
many a man with a similar request. 
But the young man who stood be- 
fore him with the red showing 
looked him firmly but modestly in 
through the brown of his cheeks 
the face. 

"Mr. Southern," John began, a little pride showing in 
the protesting tone. "I know that I am poor, but I am not 
entirely penniless. I have saved over five hundred dollars. 
My brother is going to help me and we intend to buy the 
Miller farm. You know that it is one of the best farms in 
the country and I'm sure that I can pay for it myself inside 




of two years. And then there's a good little house — " 

"That'll do. That'll do." the old man interrupted him 
with a wrathful voice. I've never believed in a man goin' 
in debt and I don't now. I hev my doubts whether ye kin 
git the Miller farm or not. But that makes no difference 
to me. Ye can't hev my gal, John Laurence, and that 

that's all there is to it. Git out 
settles it. Ive sed my say and 
and don't ye come back pesterin' 
round here any more." 

"But Mr. Southern, I love 
Hetty and I think Hetty loves me," 
John protested with the color flam- 
in? into his cheeks again but with 
steady eyes. 

D'you hear what I said, John 
Laurence.?" The wrathful old man 
half rose in his chair. "Ye can't 
hev her. Now git out." 

The old man sank back in his 
chair muttering under his breath, and John turned away 
slowly. As he walked up the Mat stone walk to the porch, 
leaving the angry old man under the pine tree, John's head 
hung heavily, but as he reached the steps, involuntarily his 
head went up and his shoulders back. A girl with yellow 
hair stood in the doorway. 

"Oh John," she cried, as they walked into the house 



293 



together, "wasn't he dreadful? I heard every thing he said. 

I couldn't help it. he talked so loud. What will we do 

now ?" 

"We'll find some way. dear, "he answered, as they sat 

down on the sofa. "Have you any idea why he is acting 

this way so suddenly ?" 

"No, John." Hetty hesitated and twisted her fingers 

together "unless it's because of Newton White. I think 

Father wants me to marry him. You know he owns a farm 

and has some money in the hank. And he's been coming 

here some lately." 

"I letty, do you like him?" 
"Why, John, how can you be so 

foolish," and Hetty put her arms around 

John's neck, "you know I don't like him. 

1 always run and hide when he comes. 

1 don't love any body but you, John, 

and I'm not going to marry any body 

but you." 

John held her close to him with a 

warm feeling of comfort at his heart, 

and with a renewed determination to 

marry her even though her father was 
the richest and therefore, the most pow- 
erful man in all the neighborhood. 

The next day John started out to 
work with a joyful and exultant spirit. 
Strength a- he threw his axe over his 

• 'I too ^rcat for him. The May morning, with the 
bright sunshine, the cool brisk air, the dew on the grass 
and leaves, the call of the wild things, all filled him with 
delight, and yet with a vague sense of desire and pain. 
I lis heart called for I lettie to share the beauties of the morn- 
ing with him. His whole life was so bound up in that of 
the girl's that he felt a sense of incompleteness without her. 
As he climbed the hill by the side of his brother, a man 




1 le rejoiced in his 
shoulder; no task- 



roughened and bent with work, his first youth gone, John's 
thoughts were with Hetty although he answered his 
brother's comments. 

"Look's like we're goin' to have pretty good crops all 
around this year." 

"I believe we are," John answered, not seeing the 
hilly landscape to which his brother had pointed, because 
of a girl's yellow hair. 

"That medder grass is goin' to be the heaviest I've 
ever seen it," his brother went on in his drawling tone. 

John looked at the meadow- with 
unseeing eyes. He saw instead the 
Miller farm and was counting in his 
mind how long it would take him to 
buy it. 

When they reached the top of the 
hill John threw down his axe and stood 
gazing down in the valley on the other 
side of the hill. At the foot of the hills 
the country road wound along and dis- 
appeared far away where the hills 
touched the sky. Across the road 
almost at John's feet stood the home of 
1 lettv, with an old fashioned stone chim- 
ney at the gable end and a wide hos- 
pitable porch in front. In the corner 
of the yard was the old pine tree under which yesterday's 
Stormy interview had occurred. John strained his eyes in 
vain to catch a glimpse of I Ietty's yellow hair and red dress. 
"Pretty tine lookin' place, ain't it?", said his brother 
slouching up beside him. "I'd give a pretty penny to own 
that hillside over yonder. It's wuth all of old Jake's for- 
tune put together." 

The hillside to which he pointed was covered with 
great large oaks and poplars which made it indeed worth a 



294 



fortune. It lay on the same side of the road as the house 
and was separated from the house by a large barren field 
covered thickly with cuv broom >,cCgQ. Between the foi- 
est and the broomsedge field was a little stream which ran 
down from the hills in a narrow channel but which broad- 
ened out where it crossed the road. 

"You been bavin' any trouble 
with the folks down there?" his 
brother asked, hesitatingly. Will 
Laurence was a much older man 
than John. He had been father 
and mother to his younger brother 
since their own father and mother 
had died. Will had managed that 
John should receive the education 
which he himself had been denied. 
The sympathy and understanding 
between the brothers were com- 
plete, but at times Will felt slight- 
ly in awe of his tall young brother. 

John hesitated a moment be- 
fore answering his brother's ques- 
tion. 

"Hetty's father ordered me 
away from the house yesterday," 
he said, chewing a piece of grass. 

"Sho now, what was the 
trouble?" 

"I'm not a rich enough man 
for Hetty, I suppose." 

John picked up his axe and 
walked to the rail pile; Will fol- 
lowed more slowly and soon the 

the two men were busy at work. All the morning they 
worked, digging holes, putting in the posts, and fastening 
the rails to them. John resisted the temptation to look 




down into the valley on the other side and worked steadily 

on. The sun shone bright, but the wind was cool and 

brisk, driving light thin clouds over the sky. 

At noon the men ate their dinner which they had 

brought with them, since they were far from the house. 

As John sat on the pile of rails eating his bread and meat, 

he watched the old house which 
was sending up from its big chim- 
ney heavy curls of smoke. If 
Hetty would only come to the door 
he would be perfectly satisfied. 
Why didn't she come? She knew 
that he was going to work on that 
hill to-day, and that he would be 
watching for her. 

"That must be Newton White's 
fine bay," Will broke in upon his 
thoughts. 

For the first time John noticed 
a horse, hitched to a light runa- 
bout, trotting along the road. From 
the high arched neck and the dain- 
ty legs of the horse John recog- 
nized Newton White's new bay. 
Towards the owner of the horse, 
a young man whose wealth inher- 
ited from his father gave him a 
certain social prestige in the neigh- 
borhood, John hud never felt any 
resentment, but now a hot rage 
flamed up in his heart. He thought 
of his own horse which he had 
cared for from a colt and which 

he loved next to Hetty. 

"I wouldn't give Dolly for a dozen bays like that one," 

he broke out. 



295 



"Dolly's a mighty fine horse," Will answered slowly. 
"That much is sartin. She's a mighty nice looking horse, 
But the) do say that White paid nigh on to five 
hundred dollars for that there bay." 

"I don't care if he did, 1 wouldn't take six hundred for 
Dolly." 

At the gate of the old fashioned farm house the horse 
stopped. The man in the runabout got out. fastened his 
horse, and went up the flat stone walk to the house. The 
front dour opened and the red dress and yellow hair of 
Hetty was framed in its opening; for a moment, and the 
door closed upon the man and woman. 

I ; <>r a moment John could not believe his eyes. That 
Hetty who only yesterday had told him that she ran away 
ami hid when Newton White came, should now open the 
door for him. It was unbelievable. It was impossible. 
John rubbed his strained eyes. No, there was the horse 
still at the gate. It was true. John had never felt jealous)' 

re, but now it surged up in his heart and beat against 
his love for Hetty and his reason which told him that 
Hetty's opening of the door was only an accident, until he 
felt himself going distracted. 

Will'- vigorous axe aroused him from this madness 

and he arose mechanically and went to work. Will, with 

ready sympathy recognized his brother's desire for 

sileftce, and scarcely a word except about the work passed 

•i the two. 
She'- a lookin' mighty red over there, ain't it?" Will 
! aboiit the middle of the afternoon, as he lifted 
the Jul; of water to hi- lip-. 

John turned with axe uplifted and looked intently at 

the sky. It had become i ed and the cloud- of -moke which 

arising were indeed too large to have come from the 

n the other side "f the hill. John threw down his 

■nd ran quickly up the slight incline to the top of the 

hill. 

"My Ilea 1 en-." he called to hi- brother who was com- 

owly, "the broomsedge field is on lire." 
Will de him and the two men stood in 

silem lov n a1 the burning licld. The dry broom- 

d < augl de i if the field next to the 



house, and, now fanned by the wind, it was sending its 
smoke and flames swiftly toward the wood on the other 
side. Here and there the flames sent out darted tongues. 
Men were rushing about furiously, pulling up and cutting 
down the broomsedge, stamping out the fire and digging 
up the sod. 

"It's got sech a headway, they're goin' to have a time 
to put it out," Will observed. "The fire's a gainin' on 'em 
all the time. The)' can't do any thing that away any how. 
I'll go down and help, I guess." , 

He looked at John for an answer. John, however, was still 
silent. He was watching the burning field and the work- 
ing men. He was sure that he could distinguish Newton 
White among them. 

"If it crosses the run them fine oaks will have to go," 
Will said again. "But it's a mighty fine thing the wind's 
a blowin' that way or the house would be in danger." 

"Let them go. I don't care." cried John, flinging him- 
self down on the ground. 

"Come on, let's go and see what we can do," said Will, 
wisely disregarding these reckless words. "You remember 
how we put out the fire over at the old Slocum place two 
years ago, don't you? That's what they need down there 
now. Come on." 

Will threw down his axe and without waiting for 
John's reply, plunged down the hill. John watched him go 
in silence. Jealous)' and anger so tilled his heart that there 
was room for nothing else, bet the old trees burn, what 
did he care? They would only go to increase Newton 
White's wealth when Newton and Hetty were married. 
Newton White was down there now. bet him put out the 
fire if he could. But before all these angry thoughts Hetty's 
face arose full of the trust and confidence which it always 
showed toward him. What was there that John could not 
do, the brown eyes seemed to say. What would she think 
of him sitting up there on the hill when there was a man's 
work to be done down in the valley? And the old trees 
seemed to call to him to come and save them for the sake of 
old times. No SO \ er\ long ago he and Hetty as children, 
had played under their shade. Even then it delighted him 
to do the bidding of the dainty fairy in the crown of oak 



296 



leaves. He had gathered acorns for her doll cups, searched 
for elves under the May apple leaves by the brook, pro- 
tected her from the Indians which sometimes showed them- 
selves to the children from behind the great moss-grown 
trunks. 

Suddenly John caught a glimpse of red, Hetty was 
running across the field to the fire. John got up and dashed 
after his brother who was half way down the hill. His 
eyes were fixed on the burning field, and he took the short- 
est way to it, caring nothing for the bushes, brambles, 
briers, and rocks over which he ran. At the fence opposite 
the house he overtook Will who greeted him with no ap- 
pearance of surprise. 

"You'd better run into the shed as you go by and git 
all the hoes and mattocks you can find," he said, as they 
climbed the fence, "I don't believe the men have 'em down 
at the field." 

John nodded and ran through the gate, up the walk, 
around the house to the shop where the farm tools were 
kept. With as many hoes, mattocks, and shovels as he 
could carry over his shoulder he ran through the side gate 
and the barn lot to the broomsedge field. 

About a dozen men were at work, including Newton 
White, five or six farm hands and three or four men who 
happened to be passing. With faces begrimed, and coats 
oft, they were fighting the fire with all their might. Each 
man, however, worked alone with no reference to the work 
of the other men. 

Old Jacob Southern, leaning on his cane, with a face 
as red as the fire about him, was rushing around with an 
energy which he had not shown for years, and shouting 
out commands and curses at the top of his voice. Hetty 
was so busy in pulling up the sedges that she did not no- 
tice John when he came up. John threw down his load 
and almost roughly pulled the girl away from the fire 
which was stealing upon her. 

"Hetty", he cried, "don't you know your dress will 
catch fire as quickly as the dry broomsedge?" 

"O John," Hetty gasped, with a note of relief in her 
voice "I'm so glad you'e come. I know that you can put 
this fire out." 



"I can't if I know that you are in danger." answered 
John, the vexation slowly leaving his face. "You go over 
there and sit down, and stay there, Hetty." 

"Let me help just a little, won't you John?", Hetty 
pleaded. 

"Here you, young man. Git to work Uiar," old Jacob's 
strident voice broke in. "Don't you see that fire? Git to 
work, I say. Don't you see it's gainin' on us all the time? 
Hetty, you, git away from this place this minute, I say. 
I've told ye once, and I'm not goin' to tell ye agin. Git 
back to the house I say, and be mighty quick about it, too. 
Brown, stomp down that fire behind ye quick. Where are 
your eyes, man? Can't ye see nothin'? God help us. The 
fire's bound to git over the run and then what are we goin' 
to do? Heaven only knows. Bill ye," his voice trailed 
off in the distance. 

Hetty, who had paid no attention to her father's bawl- 
ing commands, had been persuaded by John to cross the 
little stream to a safe place under the trees. 

"You stay over there, Hetty, and don't come back here 
at all," John ordered and Hetty had made a little face but 
she had obeyed. 

"Now, John," and Will, who had been fighting the fire 
since his arrival, rushed up to his brother. "Let us get the 
men across the run and begin diggin' over there where the 
broomsedge starts to growin'. The fire'll cross the run 
as quick as lightnin !" 

"All right, go ahead," John responded, and ran to the 
nearest group of men, pulling sedges as he went. 

"We'll never get the fire out this way, boys." he shout- 
ed in order to make himself heard. "Let's go over there 
across the run and begin digging toward the fire. That's 
the only way. Will's going now." 

Two or three men turned toward him. their faces drip- 
ping with sweat. 

"Oh, it's John Laurence." one of them explained after 
a swift glance. 

"What do you know about this, John'", laughed a 
younger man. 

"I know this much, that you're not going to put out 
the fire the way you're working now," lohn answered a trifle 



297 



hotly, "It is gaining on you all the time. It's more than 
half way across the field new." 

"Who is this fellow?", a third man asked somewhat 

i mptuously of a companion. 

[ohn recognized the voice as that of Newton White. 
Hi- face Hushed and he turned to the man with an angry 
reply but checked himself in time. 

"You arc not even keeping the fire in check," he went 
on. "It'- not your fault, 1 well know. The fire is too large, 
ami the wind i- blowing too hard. It will be in the woods 
soon if it isn't stopped. Will helped put out a fire as large 
a- this over at the Slocum place two years ago and he knows 
h< >u ." 

"At the Slocum place." echoed one of the men. draw- 
ing hi- sleeve across his face. 

"What's he doing now.?" another man asked, half per- 
suaded. 

"lie i- going to begin over there and pull np enough sod 
thai the tire can not cross," shouted John. 

"Well that sounds pretty reasonable to me," admitted 
a man who had been taking the lead in the work. "Come 
on, boys, and let'- try this new scheme." 

"1 don't believe in any such foolishness," exclaimed 
Newton White who had been paying no attention to John's 
explanation-. 

But the men were already running across the field and 
he was left alone. Soon nearly all had followed, picking 
up a- they went the hoe- and mattocks which John had 
thrown d '\\ n. 

"Mere, here, boys, where are you going?" yelled Jacob 
Southern a- he became aware of their departure. "Come 
back here. Ye can't do nothing over there. That's not 
the place to fight lire. Don't ye hear me? Come back 
here. I say. The pesky fool-. You here," as he caught 
sighl of John who was the la-t to leave, "what do ye mean 
by tin- grand piece of foolishness, boy? Call them men 
D'you hear whut I say? The field's lost if 
the) don't." 

"Come on Mr. Southern," John called back a- he ran. 
"\\ i ing to save the tree- for you." 

"Newt, ye -till here I see," and the wrathful old man, 
who had stopped in hi- tirade because he was out of breath, 



turned to Newton White who was the only man left near. 
"Whose darned plan is this?" 

"It's John Laurence's, I think, sir," answered the young 
man, pausing in his work. "I do not quite understand what 
they are going to do. I don't think they know themselves." 

"Well 1 guess I'll run over there and see what the fools 
mean. Boys alwus need a stiddy hand on 'em. The work 
'ud go to rack and ruin if I wasn't around." 

"Since 1 can't do any thing here by myself I think I'll 
get in the runabout and see if I can get more help for you," 
returned Newton White who was determined not to work 
under the direction of John Laurence. 

"All right. Newt, all right. I'm sure we need more 
help. Stop at the house and git yourself somethin' to eat. 
I'll just toddle over and see whut them boys is a fixin' up. - ' 

.Meanwhile the men had crossed the brook which they 
knew would be no barrier to the fire, and were now digging 
up the sod on the slope below the trees. The fire, moved 
by the wind, was sweeping toward them at a swift rate 
since all checks were removed. Every man inspired by 
John's enthusiasm, was working away as though his life 
depended upon it. 

"Now then," and Will threw down the mattock. 

A space of ground, about six feet in width, and extend- 
ing along below the trees, facing the greater force of the 
fire, had been cleared of its sod. 

"Now then, boys," cried Will, "light the broomsedge 
along the lower edge of here and get it to burning briskly." 

John had already begun the work of firing the broom- 
sedge along the lower edge of the cleared ground, and soon 
it was burning briskly. The men tired and worn, stood 
watching the two fires. 

Hetty who had been sitting under a great oak far 
above the cleared ground suddenly screamed. John turned 
quickly to see a fire springing up which had been carried 
over the barrier by an ambitious spark. He jumped across 
and stamped it ottt before it had time to spread. 

The smaller fire did not burn so rapidly since it was 
burning against the wind, and so the men went about 
through it here and there and lighted the sedges. On and 
on came the larger fire; around the hill, down to the brook, 



298 



over the brook, and the two fires met along their line of 
advance. For a moment the flames blazed up brighter and 
higher than ever, but only for a moment. Then all along 
the line the fire died away for lack of fuel. 

"Good work, boys, good work," shouted Jacob South- 
ern who had gradually become quiet during the anxious 
watching. "That wuz a fine scheme of yourn, John Lau- 
rence. At first I didn't think it would work, I tell ye, young 
man. It peared mighty risky for a time." 

"It was not my thought," John denied. "It was Will's, 
and John joined the men who were carefully putting out any 
sparks of fire which might be left. 

"Well, well, all the danger's over, Hetty, child," the 
old man cackled, "You run home now and tell your ma to 
hev us all a good hot supper, a good one, mind ye. Come 
on, boys, you've worked long enough. We'll leave Jake 
and Bill here to watch the field, and send them their supper." 

Hetty ran down the hill with a happy face. 



"Come on, John," she called, as she passed John who 
was still working. 

"I'm not going, Hetty. Will and I are going home," 
John answered moodily. 

"Oh, John," Hetty began. 

"What's this agout goin' home," shouted her father, 
coming up. "Goin' home. Of course you're not goin' 
home. Every single one of you are comin' over to the house 
and hev supper. You come right on, John Laurence." 

"Come on, John," Hetty insisted. "Don't you see 
father is giving in. That is his way. He can't do better 
than that. Don't you be stubborn now, please, dear." 

And as John walked across the blackened field with 
Hetty his heart was light, although he was tired and weary, 
his face begrimed, his hands burned. But he forgot all these 
discomforts when he saw the happy light in Hetty's eyes, 
the ligfht which he knew shown in his own. 




299 








L Jokaa and Near- J»fc©s J 



Student translating Anglo-Saxon — "J will never depart 
from thee — unless — " 

l'mfessor — "Go on! 'me se aelmvtiga God — take me." 



Professor of .Mediaeval History 
wrot the Ecclesiastical History?" 



-'"Who was it that 



B r i g h t Student 
— ' 'Adam Bede.' ' 



Law students got 
a bit ga) . 

Killed a police- 
man one day; 

1 )ean I togg was 
almost irritated, 

Called them 1111- 
si iphisticated. 



Lewis C. to 

"Bobbie" l\. on a hay-ride — "There are just two things 
that I have against you — my head and my back." 

Professor Emory — "This statement we can accept as 
being true." Seeing expressions of doubt among the class. 

"Well, if s.,, u lis not ?" 

In the fall term Dr. Purinton said that he had a very 
ati< >nal class in ' gy. 




Prof. Armstrong — "Mr. Baker, you tell us what trouble 
Shakespeare got into." 

Baker — "Well first he married Anne Hathaway." 

Prof. Armstrong — "Xante one of Shakespeare's come- 
dies." 

Pyles — "Midnight Summers Dream." 

Ada (on the farm) — "Do you understand the process 
of your churning, Mr. Farmer? Let me tell you. When 
you pour in the sour cream you furnish the individual no- 
tion; After a time of adjustment, you have the general no- 
li' hi in the r< ill i if butter." 

At Tetrick's trial — Evidence: 

i. Officer saw Tetrick pushing those in front of him 

2. Tetrick was in the front rank. 

3. He saw him yell. 

4. lie did not hear any noise, hut saw his mouth. 
open. 

5. lie was about five feet away from him. 

6 He did not see him do anything, hut he had his 
coat off. 



At Monticola Board Meeting — Koelz- 
keeper in heaven ?" 

Ulender— "Mitchell, I believe." 
Koelz— "Which Mitchell— John?" 



"Who is book- 



300 




JTth 




T-N 



; 3 












We tied the can on W. U. P. to the tune of 18 to zip. 



F ty (in Athenian Society) — "My honorable ex- 
ponent has said — Well, what are you fellows laughing at?" 

Hoskins — "It takes a man with brains to play chess." 
Miss D. — "Did you ever play, Mr. Hoskins?" 

Dr. Whitehill (to student who persisted in sleeping 
during class) — "How many courses do you have, young 
man?" 

Sleeper — "Three." 

Dr. W. — "Don't you think you had better take another? 
Three hours sleep a day is hardly enough for a young man." 



E N. pledge (after 
a good play in the 
Lyceum gam e — ■ 
"Let's give three 
cheers for Hawley." 
First pledge — 
'But Hawley isn't in 
the game." 

Second pledge — ' 
"Well, I guess we can 
cheer for him any- 
how." 



Clara — "What would express the condition of celibacy 
in a woman?" 

Daisy — "Spinster." 

Dr. Truscott (to Miss Roberts who persisted in pro- 
nouncing Kusse with a long vowel) — "Miss R. — it matters 
not how long the operation expressed in Kusse is, the vowel 
itself is always short." 

Wanted — An authentic and well-written biography of 
the Hon. Dave Cronin. 

— Professor Deahi 

A Co-ed (after a visit to Sammy Brown) — "I declare, 
he's the giggliest man I ever saw." 





Studying far into the night 
The beautiful co-ed sat ; 

Her head was full of jumbles, 
And her hair was full of rat. 

Emma B. (speaking of floods) 
— "I was always afraid of water, 
but once I took my nerve with me 
and got on a raft." 

Claire — "Its a wonder it didn't 
sink the raft." 



Emma B. — "I'm not a brainy girl at all." 

Student — "No, you have the boys too much in mind." 

The following problem was given in Emory's class; 
How many men would it take to lift 198 lbs., if each man 
lifts 75 lbs.? To which the answer was 2 48-75 men. The 
following answers were given by the class: 

Feller — "A man and a boy." 

"Horse" Wiley — "Two men and a hired girl, because 
it's a little more than half a man." 

In an expository paper, Professor Patterson was told 
to add a nutmeg and a table-spoonful of salt. He went to 
the board and worked it out : 



1 nutmeg plus I 
table - spoonful o f 
salt equals 1 salted 

peanut. 

They were dis- 
cussing fraternity 
types. 

He — " W hat 
would you say our 
type is" J " 

She — "Tin-type." 




501 



Analogous Definitions. Wit — An incongruous congru- 
ity suddenly exposed — Purinton. 

Humor — A juxtaposition of incongruous concepts. — 
Cox. 

Dr. Purinton on Sensation. 

"Sensation is a subjective experience of the soul, ani- 
mating an extended sensorium, usually more or less pain- 
ful or pleasurable and always occasioned by an exhortation 
of the sensory." 

Morris tried to register. "Jack" toM him he could 
not on account of not having returned a pair of running 
pants to the Gym. 

"You arc held up by the pants, Mr. Morris," said 
"Jack." 

Hal Scott signed up in Law in the fall, and took up 
"Domestic Relations." It was noticed that he was a fre- 
quent visitor at the " I tall." 

"Jack" to student who registered from Morgantown — ■ 
"Mr. Flourckey. did you vote here last fall?" 

Mr. F. — "Why. Professor Hare, I intended to, hut I 
forgot it." 

Thirteen people sil down to dinner. Within a year 
one of them dies. What inference do you draw from that, 

Answer — They are hoarding at a "Fort," and one of 
them had the habit of being late to meals. 

Two prominent students made an election bet. If 
Bryan won. the man was to marry the girl; if Taft won, 
the girl was to marry the man. 

Tan Won. 

The fellow hacked down. 
The girl sued. 

Puzzle Questions; I i > How much would a jury com- 
d of frat. men allow her? Ui < u non fral men'-' (3) 
Of Facult) members? (4) Of Woman's Mall girls? 



Soph, to Freshie — "How are you classified?" 

Freshie — "I guess, if I'm anything, I'm a Freshman." 

Soph. — "You're not anything, then." 



It was at the Junior Class 
play. Chas. L. and Elsie K. met 
and shook hands very cordially. 

Chas. L. — "Don't be too 
sincere ; this is only a play." 

Guy Donley ( hunting rab- 
bits — "I can't shoot 'em when 
they run up hill." 

In Education class thought 
is a minus quantity. To pass 
away the time some on pats his 
foot. "Don't pat your feet — 
pat your heads," said Professor 
Deahl. 



The land-lady had begun to boil water for table use. 
One evening when ice tea was served, Bruce W. remarked: 

"You must have burnt this writer. Missus." 

Mr. Barnes (in Criminal Law Class) — "Gentlemen, if 
you have no serious purpose in life, for Cod's sake, get one! 
You desecrate and disgrace the sacred profession of law by 

your littering and noise in class. Disgrace. 1 say!" 

May — "I'm reading a story to get inspiration for a 
letter." 

Dorcas — "What are you reading.'" 
May — "A love story." 




S. 
'n mud 

C- 

s.- 



A Winter Term Joke. 
'Have you seen the new counterfeit dollars going 

'Silver < >nes 

'No, athletic passes." 



302 



Dr. Simpson — "Mr. Caldwell, what is the center of 
the nervous system?" 

Mr. C. "The heart." 

Clara — "Why is Dr. Elliot giving up the Harvard pres- 
idential chair?" 

Mabel — "To sit on the Carnegie Foundation." 

Wise Observer to Co-ed — "You 
haven't pupils in your eyes; you 
have students." 

"Sporty" Student— "You ought 
to have seen Ethel and I studying 
in the Library this afternoon." 

ist Friend — "You men 'Ethel 
and me,' don't you?" 

2nd Friend — "To be accurate, I 
don't suppose 'Ethel and me' is right 
either." 

At a Pan-Hellenic Dance. 

Ardent Pledge— "Miss M., will 
you please teach me the drop-stitch 
two-step?' 

At one of the Forts. 

"That there fellow never did know nothing, nohow." 
Emory had been explaining an operation in Mechanics 

Gorby— "Do you mean to say that this method is all 
right Prof.?" 

Emory — "Yes, sir." 

Gorby— "Well I thought so before you began to talk, 
but I'm all mixed up now." 

Overheard on the Street. 

Prof. Eisland— "It's a shame the way that man Kena- 
jean flunked the poor boys." 

McClure— "It took me three days to come home from 

Culver." 

B — "Do you mean that it took you three days to go, 
finish up there and come back, or did you have to walk 
back?" 




Koelz — "I'll have to notify Prof. Armstrong that he 
has been chosen on the prize-story committee." 

Louchery — "Let me tell him ; I want to pass in English." 

Prof. Hodges (in Physics) — "Now, if I had as great a 
capacity in electricity as I have in some things — " 

Hoskins (at table) — "Mr. P — t., you have not said a 
word this whole meal; what is the matter?" 



Mr. P — t — "I'm not sup- 
posed to do the talking 
here." 

Prof. Mestrezat (at band 
practice) — "Why do you 
blow so loud Mr. Collins?" 

C. — "Well, when I came 
down here mother said that 
she wanted to hear from 
me, and I'm doing my best." 



The Y. M. C. A. Convention. 

Mr. R. (to stranger as he got off of train) — "Are you 
a Y. M. C. A. delegate?" 
Stranger — "No." 
Mr. R. — "I wonder where in H they are !" 

The following notice was found posted in the Gym. 
last winter : 

"That overcoat of mine which was taken by mistake 
from the dressing-room of the Gym. last Friday evening 
may fit you, and if you like it 1 will loan it to you Com- 
mencement Week, but I need it now. Won't you kindly 

return it." 

JESSE J. JENKINS. 




ed." 



At Presbyterian Church. 

ist Student— "Simeon's mirror on the organ is crook- 

2nd Student — "No wonder! just think who looks into 



303 



Collins — "This uniform of mine is on the pork." 
Bambrick— "I thought it had been ever since yon have 
been wearing it." 

Dr. Sheldon — "Everyone should study some science. 
no matter what he intends to do in life." 

Clara C. — "Well Doctor, what science would you ad- 
vise a girl to take who isn't going to teach or doesn't know 
what she is g( dng to do?" 

Doctor S. — "Domestic Science." 



Sign — Wanted, a wife. 





SANGER. 

Dr. Truscott (to 
Miss B. — . who was 

yawning vociferously ) 
— "I'm sorry to inter- 
rupt you at such a crit- 
ical moment, but will 
you please translate." 



Freshman to Librarian— "Can you show me where I 
can find something on the Pilgrims? I've read Pilgrim's 
Progress." 

Prof. Trotter— "Your term- are so different here from 
those at Buchannon. We newer said 'Hunk', we said 
'bust' ". 

Stud e n t— "I s u p p o s e 
thai was the result of a 
'cram.' 

The -iris in the 1 1 all were 
having a chicken feast. 

Genievive — "I like these 
hen-parties." 

Student i in theme on I .in- 
coln) — "Mi- sympathy for his 
fellowmen was almost divine. 





The Seniors Think So, Too. 
Augustus Loriquinto — "It would be well for me if I 
did not have to take anv examinations; it would be good." 



The Modesty of Him! 
Jenkins — "Miller, why 
did you resign as declaimer 
for your literary society ?" 

Miller— "Well, I'll tell 
you Jenkins. I'm only a 
Prep., you know, and I am 
sure I'd win if I stayed on, 
and I did not want to get too 
popular." 



Gunnoe (discussing Socrates) — "Socrates was not like 
other men ; he loved his wife." 

It was this that made him get out in the mud with his 
Sunday suit on, to pull a pig out of the mire." 

Small boy (to Woman's Hall girl)— "Will you please 
tell me where the Sigma Shy Mouse is?" 

Lorado Taft (showing a huge paper skull in his lecture) 
—"This is no human skull, but it is very hard when lectur- 
ing in a college town to convince the audience that it is 
not the skull of a Sophomore." 

Ask Susan about her Peter Tompkins suit. 

Student (in a theme) — "Lincoln is a bright star in our 
firmament." 

"Pat"_"l don't believe we have a firmament. If we 
had I'm not in favor of expansion in that direction for T 
don't believe the inhabitants would assimilate." 

Sophomore— "There's the Beta Theta Pi Mouse." 
Freshman— "Baked Potato pie house! What's that?' 

304 



Dr. Purinton (in Ethics)— Miss , what do you 

understand 'by hospitality ?" 

Miss - — does not respond with much enthusiasm, 

so the good doctor tries to help her out of her embarrass- 
ment. 

D r . p _"Now Miss , let me illustrate. Suppose 

a man should come to your house and ask to stay all night. 
What would you do?" 

yj; ss "I'd look him over." 

Prof. Barnes — "Mr. Shores, what degree of force is 
necessary in making an arrest?" 

Mr. Shores — "Necessary force?" 

p ro f p> — "Why Mr. Shores, I'm surprised that you 
should give such a vague and indefinite answer after study- 
ing Criminal Proceedure all this term. All force that will 
be necessary in making the arrest will be proper. Remem- 
ber that, Mr. Shores. You may have that question on 
examination." 

Miss Moore — "Young ladies, do you know it's not 
proper for a young man to take a lady's arm unless she's 
past sixty?" 

One of the girls — "Wish I were sixty. 



Overheard at a Dance. 

Dashing young lad}- — "Mr. Koelz, you seem to be 
blase this evening." 

"Dutch" K. — "I'm — er — yes, I guess so." 
Prof. Armstrong — "Who was Hotspur?" 
Student — "He was Falstaff in 'Julius Caesar.' 

Russell (trying to illustrate the advance in engineering 
since our forefathers — "Why, even our professors never 
had a course in hot air." 

Allender — "That was because their professors did not 
have the material to work en that your's have." 

Brinkrnan "The spinal cord is a yellow serous fluid 

made up of gray and white matter. 

Brambrick (at bowling alley) "Now, I see thirty pins 
down there and I'm going to get the ten on the right." 

A ball rolled down the alley. "Now, I'll get the ones 
on the left." 

Afterward, "I can't see how all six of those balls 
missed thirty pins. 

Dr. Reese (to tardy student) — "Do you have a class to 
Dr. Deahl?" 

Student — "Nc, but 1 have to Miss Cuchanan, and that's 
just as bad." 




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A B &m off W. V. U» 



A is Athletics which need renovation 

To give us a place on the Carnegie Foundation. 

B is for Basket-hall which now is no more, 

Because we can't scratch up the Armory floor. 

C is for Chapel, attended by few ; 

By professors ne'er more than twenty-two. 

D stands for Dickinson, (Dickey for short), 
He comes from Cornell, as is the report. 

E is for Eisland, who lives on math-matics, 

His taste is quite varied, but he likes best quadratics. 

F is for Foxy whose time is now past, 

But in his successor his terror will last. 

G is for Gym — the one we don't have, 

But in the state Senate we hope to find salve. 

H is for Hick of medical fame; 

No matter his name, he's cut up just the same. 

I is for It — of Simeon we speak — 

He talks like an old woman, but never is meek. 

J is for Jokes, both the good and the bail ; 

The committee can testify they're hard to be had. 

K is for Kindergarten, home of the preps, 

Whose emblems are primers and little green caps 

L is for Law-school — obstreperous boys, 

Whose presence is known only by their loud noise. 

M 's for Monticola of 1910, 

When you've read it once, you will read it again. 




N is for nothing, the whole Senior Class. 

Nuf Ced — we'll be rid of them soon if they pass. 
O is Organizations of which we've a plenty, 

No more or no less than one hundred and twenty. 
P is for Prexy, a great man is he, 

Who is fond of the Sunday-School and Ministry. 

Q is for Quizzes, which all of us fear. 

Each prof, gives one hundred and fifty a year. 

R is for Rushing, of which there's much done, 

Both by frats and by him who is hunting just one. 

S stands for sit the present of sat — 

What some of the faculty practice on Pat. 

T is for Tommy, who runs the whole thing. 
It is always to him our troubles we bring. 

U is for Upsilon, the middle you see 

Of a popular fraternity called D. U. B. 

V s + ands for Varsity, the Old Gold and Blue; 
Our victories are many, our defeats very few r . 

W r is for Work, which some of us do. 

The rest of us trust to our luck to get through. 

X is Xams, which come three times a year ; 

Great sport for profs, but to us a night-mare. 

Y is for You who are reading these jingles, 
A little of truth in most of them mingles. 

Z is for "Zat" of Cadet Band fame; 

Its the end of a most unpronounceable name. 



307 







P^ 



THE CLASS RUSt 

PLUPY 



ACCORDING 




^a 






hear Beany, 

the stewdcats have come back and they has been lots 
of fits, you aught to have seen the cue they had last 
Monday night. It was the best the we have had since 

At 7 oh'clock they was crowds of them out on the 
campus. All hollering and raising time. 2 of the stewd- 
cats kept hollering "Freshmen this way" and "Sopmoars 
this way" and then they all let ding at each other as tite as 
the) cood go. It was perty tuf to see sum of them new 
fellers not ennybigger'n i am getting paisted. A grate big 
skinny feller climb up on Curly Watkins sholeders but 
Curly give him a side winder and plunked him rite down 
on the concreek side walk. I nearly dide laffin when some 
feller took Scotty King's galluses of. Some one saw me 
laffin and grabed me by the shert and throwed me rite into 
the guter — it tore my pants and i was mad as time so i 
piched into the ferst feller I saw and roled him round in 
the mud. 

Then Mickey Morgan came hipering down the field 

waving his arms and yelling to get back — 1 didn't dass not 

I got back but nobody else paid enny attension, as 

they went at it agen with a gump. Harry Stulting got 

rooted agensl a tree and hit his lied whack and fell down 

as if he was ded and they grabed him up an put water 
on his lied and he waked np and was all rite but he had a 
lied. 

And then they all gol in a line and marched passed 
Mister Purinton's house and down street, i micss i wont 
wrighl down what they sung. One of the stewdcats (last 
the • nto the show and then you aught to have 

-ecu them jam Pewt and me went rite in with the rest of 



them and was pushing like time when a policeman grabed 
Pewt by his red neckti and swoar feerful, whitch was 
perty tuf on Pewt when he dident deserve enny thing. 
Then Pewt and me crossed our throtes and swoar we'd 
get even we hipered around the corner and hooked sum 
apples and eggs frum a grocery dump — when we come back 
we give sum of the apples and eggs to the stewdcats and 
then we got behind poles and I took that policeman rite in 
the back of the bed with a rotten apple and it busted and 
went down his collar, we nearly dide laffing. Pewt peek- 
ed out just in time to get one rite in the eye. i nearly bust- 
ed but i dident dars to laff. Then sum more policemen 
came up and we choze a rotten eg to plug one of them, we 
let ding at him and it hit a stewdcatrite in the neck and 
broke and spattered him all over with yellow. Then the 
policemen took two of the stewdcats off as prisoners and 
the crowd follered them. That is jest the way some body 
always brakes up the good fites. i bet on the freshmen. 

i went home and i was afraid i would get a licking and 
i did two for when 1 come in father said where in thunder 
have you been and i told him and he said i will attend to 
you sir and he took me upstares and gave me a whaling 
gosh you bet it hurt. They hasnt been any more fites, 
rany as time, w right soon 

Yours very respectively 
PLUPY. 
P. S. — I have got a black eye and a scrached nose. The 
paper says a stewdcat hit that poliseman whitch is a awful 
big lie — dont forget to wright. 

Yours very respectively 
PLUPY. 

308 



Students' Protective Union of West Virginia University 




This organization shall be called the Students' Pro- 
tective Union of the West Virginia University. 

OBJECT. 

The object of this union shall be to secure to the stu- 
dents of the West Virginia University the fullest measure 
of protection from the unjust and deliberate encroachments 
and tyrannical infringements by the members of the faculty 
of said university upon the rights of the humble and sub- 
missive students. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Membership in this union shall be restricted to degree 
students of honorable and veracious character except as 
hereinafter provided : 

1. No Prep shall be admitted into the sacred bonds 
of this union, because he lias not as yet developed a con- 
scious sense of honor, hence his veracity is open to grave 
doubt. 

2. No engineering student shall be a member of this 
union, because through lack of literary training he would 
fail to comprehend the profound obligations that would 
necessarily be encumbered upon him as a worthy and es- 
teemed member of the union. 

3. No special student shall be admitted to membership 
into the union unless he shall first have made an average 
grade of 99 19-20 per cent in one of the following courses, 
to-wit : English 39, Criminal Law or Criminal Procedure, 
the first six courses of Jack Hare"s Latin, Dutch 5 under 
Bill Baumgartner, calculus under Johnny Eiesland on 
Economics under Pete Reynolds. 

Should any special student be so precocious as to 



fulfill these requirements and be elected into member- 
ship into the union he shall not be allowed the privi- 
lege of a vote or considered worthy of holding any 
office in the union. 

4. No short term law student shall be admitted into 
this union unless he be able to recite verbatim the consti- 
tution of England, putting in proper inflections and punctu- 
ations. 

OFFICERS. 

The officers of this union shall be : 

Grand Exalted Protecting Mogul ; 

The most Humble Vice-Mogul; 

The Chief Keeper of Records and Stable Boss of the 

Ponies ; 
The Protecting Discretionary of the Dough Pan ; 
Count Knight of the Saddle or Head Pony Breaker. 

PRIVILEGES GUARANTEED TO THE MEMBERS. 

Every member of the union shall have the privilege of 
leaving any class at the ring of the bell on the half-hour. 
Any professor daring to hold a class a fraction of a second 
over time shall be summoned to appear before the court of 
the Grand Exalted Protecting Mogul to show cause why he 
should not dismiss his class on time. If in his defence no 
adequate cause shall appear he shall be subjected to one of 
the following punishments according to the gravity of the 
offence committed: 

1. lie shall be deprived of his pipe and tobacco for 
such a period as the Grand Exalted Protecting Mogul shall 
deem proper; provided, that such time be no less than three 
months or more than one vear. 



309 



lie shall he publicly taken to the bank of the river, 
and the Grand Exalted Protecting Mogul shall take his cap, 
hat, chapeau, or other head dress and shall then and there 
cast said cap, hat. chapeau, or other head dress into the 
turbid waters of the angry Monongahela. 

3. Me shall not allow "P>oss" or "Pide," his cows, to 
run on the commons for one month. 

11. All students belonging to this union shall have 
the use of the Library for all purposes; except that the 

Analaysis of a Six Weeks' 
Engagement 

A manuscript has been lately found which belonged to 
the personal effects of our former friend, A. Reginald Van 
Foughserr, who. as all know, was with us in the fall term 
a- a special student in the courses offered at the library, 
for the benefit of those who have come in since, we give a 
short account of the lamentable romance that was connected 
with his brief stay among us. and which clings to us as a 
bitter memory of the unfortunate young man. 

Shortly after entering school, young Van Fonghserr 
met the igi rl whom he declared at once to be his affinity; 
we shall not be so painful as to mention her name. She. 
mistaking his affections for a transient delusion, did what 
she could to make their associations happy, but as she 
maintained nothing was further from her thoughts than 
love. In about a month's time, the two became engaged, 
she treating the whole affair only as a college lark. But 
when he insisted unceasingly that he could live no longer 
without her, she decided it was time to bring mailers to a 
The great grief that he experienced at learning 
his fate led him to put down an itemized account of his 
life during the blissful period. The paper was found in- 
en the leaves of a note book. It follows : 



marriage shall not be celebrated therein. 

III. Among the members of the union there shall be 
a mutual exchange of all keys, interlinears, quiz questions, 
ponies, etc. 

I V. Any member riding or driving through an ex- 
amination shall at all times willingly assist any humble, 
plodding, wayfaring, pedestrians who are members of this 
union. 



^sse^- 



ANALYSIS OF A SIX WEEKS' ENGAGEMENT. 

By a once happy, but now soul-weary student. 

Waiting 49 hours. 

Quarrels, 10 averaging 2 hours, 20 hours. 

Make-ups, 10 averaging 30 minutes, 5 hours. 

Kisses, 3104 averaging 48 seconds 43 hours. 

Silences 24 h< turs. 

Interview with father (letter) 2 hours. 

Changing rings 4 days. 

Loss of sleep, average per day. 8 hours. 

Negotiating loans 12 hours. 

Amount of loans $850 

Perfect bliss 126 hours. 

Medium bliss 10 hours. 

Tips to maid, $22 

Pies told 88 

Loss in weight ... . 8 pounds 

Crushed cigarettes 284 

Cabs $33 

Theater tickets $ 9 

Gifts $ So 

Satisfaction Trace 

Lasting satisfaction No trace 

Broken heart 1 



310 




HE soft light of the setting sun is shed on W oodburn 1 1 all. 

The campus smiles with beauty in the evening's mellow glow, 
The green trees, old and mighty, whisper gently of sweet days, 
The days of their own youth, bright days of long ago. 

The maple in the Circle speaks; the other trees give heed 

To this sage monarch, while he tells the story dear to all, 
Of the girls of ancient Woodburn, how they spent the happy hours, 

When, in the eventide, the shades began to fall. 
"Where now, by Martin Hall, there stands a weather-stained platform, 

Its blackened boards supported by four walls of moss-grown stone, 
The old well found great favor in the days 'before the war,' 

Not then, as it is now, unprized, unloved, unknown. 
Each summer night, before the sun had set behind the hills, 

Out came the girls of Woodburn with white pitchers in their hands, 
Sat down a while beside the well, sat down upon the stile 

And viewed the winding river on its way to southern sands. 
And before they filled their pitchers with pure water from the well, 

The clear, cold water known and praised by people far and near, 
They sang with voices soft and low the quaint old songs they loved, 

Responded with glad voices to the evening's glowing cheer. 

To them the well had only sweet associations; they 

AYere loth to leave it when the dusk had warned them of the night. 
They filled their pitchers slowly, went reluctantly away 

When already, in old Woodburn, the candles were alight." 

"Who cares about the old well now?" The maple, asking sighs; 

The other trees make no reply but murmuring shake their leaves, 
Yet before their murmuring ceases, the Maple bids them look 

Toward the old neglected well, for there an answer he receives. 

Gazing at the ugly platform, with sorrowing, tear-dimmed eyes, 

Her thoughts upon the distant past, a white-haired woman stands; 

She can not bear the mournful change ; She sadly turns away 
And views the winding river on its way to southern sands. 

311 



SIMEON, SPARE THAT THEME! 
("Woodmen Spare That Tree.") 

Sime< in, spare that theme ! 

■ili not a single line! 
In youth it served me well, 
When 1 had English Nine. 

'Twas in v forefather's hand 
That wrote it first of all : 
There, Simeon, mark it not 
With thy unsightly scrawl. 
That old familiar theme 
Deserves world-wide renown. 
It is a perfect dream — 

It is a perfect dream — and wouldst thou mark it down? 
Simeon, forbear thy stroke! 
Mar not it- pages fair. 
( )h, spare that aged work- 
Now great beyond compare. 
When but an idle hoy, 
I sought it'^ grateful air ; 
My sister used it, too — 
She was a joyful maid. 
My mother blistered us : 
My father whipped in vain — 
Forgive this foolish tear, 

I can't forget that pain. 

My heart-strings round thee cling, 
Because you've saved me, friend. 
From writing many a theme 
Which might have been my end. 
Old theme! The storm -till brave I 
And. Simeon, make no bl< ,t. 

I I 1 could have my way, 
Th\ peii should harm it not. 



CONONDRUMS. 

i. West Virginia's largest spoondiolder? 

2. The professor who knows just how to woo? 

3. Our swiftest professor? 

4. The faculty rabbit? 
Answers: 

1. Cheat. 

2. Courtright (Prof.) 

3. Trotter, (Prof.) 

4. Hare. (Prof). 

First is in ardor hut not in zeal. 

Second is in flour hut not in meal 

Third is in merry but not in gay 

Fourth is in September but not in May 

Fifth is in short but not in long 

Sixth is in carol but not in song 

Seventh is in wisdom hut not in sage 

Eighth is in anger but not in rage 

Ninth is in age but not in time 

(No other letter adds a rhyme) 

My whole spells the name of an honored professor; 

And if you indeed are a very good guesser, 

The mystery here may not remain long. 

lint you quickly discover Professor . 

My first is as cold as the icebergs that jam. 
And the chill is reflected in him whose 1 am ; 
My second is that upon which we all stand, 
lint is not firm than his rod-wielding hand. 
My whole scares the engineers out of their spunk, 
And lucky is he who escapes his dread Flunk. 

Professor (to student reading Shakespeare) — "Can't 
you read that as though you were talking to me?" 
Student — "Yes, Professor, but that was an 'aside.' 



312 






W.V. U. Flower Gardemi 

Hyacinth (Glennosi Hunteratia) 
The Hyacinth is a flower of the hardy class. 
It grows equally well in doors and out-of- 
doors. It is very pretty, does not grow yery 
high, and is found in various colors. A very 
stylish flower with a neat clean-cut appearance. 
As a potted plant it is often found adorning the 
Library. It is best known as a companion of 
the Blood-root. 

Bluebell ( Lulutia Laytonia) 
The Bluebell swings, generally screened 
by thick vines, and nods its dainty head to 
passers-by as soon as the warmth of spring- 
opens. It is a very delicate flower, whose. music 
can be heard whenever the air stirs. It is 
always worn at dances and is a popular posie 
with' fraternities. Its cultivation is compara- 
tively easy and it is sure to bring cheer 
wherever it is found. 

Crocus (Marshus Watkinsae) 

This is a very fresh and early flower, which 

always attracts much attention when it appears 

in the early spring. It does not grow to any 

great height, but by its yellow top always 

>pearing first among the flowers, it is easily 

cognized. The chief characteristics of the 

pi ant are that it is always first to appear and it 

tries to make a great impression by its gorgeous 

appearance. 




app 

re 

pl 



The Dandelion ( Nellisimae Hendersonae), 
von will remember, is a yery common flower; 
not showy or of especial fragrance. Its stock 
rises to no great height but is rather inclined 
to spread out horizontally. You may see its 
golden blossom frequently among the "Mead- 
ows" and along the walks. 

313 




Daffodil (Doctorus Truscottus). 

This a gallant young flower, for it stands 
nodding and bowing the whole day through to 
the daisies and other flowers around it. Usually 
found in sunny valleys and on Sunny (side) 
slopes. 



Daisy (Dasae 1'richardiae) 

The Daisy is a familiar flower, seen grow- 
ing almost anywhere; in meadows, fields, along 
the roadside and even in athletic fields. It 
needs little cultivation or encouragement, is 
easily grown. It is not especially fragrant, 
but its snow-white corolla and golden centre 
suggest purity and sunshine. 



Oak (Leealia 1 lutchinsonia ) 

The Oak is considered one of the sturdiest 
and strongest of trees. It is noted for its pow- 
er of resistance in the field when beset by oppos- 
ing forces and the onrush of storms. It is well 
rounded and very attractive. When dressed 
and polished the wood forms a very popular' 
medium of interior decoration. Useful for par- 
lors. 




1 lardy Hydrangia (Florencicus Jacksonitus) 

A ver) sturdy plant with short thick stock, 
but a very pleasing flower tinged with delicate 
pink surrounded by dark green leaves. This 
is not a hothouse plant, nor does it need nurs- 
ing in a sun parlor, hut thrives best in the open 
where it takes a certain delight in the rain and 
rough weather. It is often seen growing in 
Morgantown, hut can well stand transplanting. 



314 





Dark Red Rose, (Clarissilis Cliffordis) is 
a very attractive flower growing as it does upon 
a tall graceful stem. Its rich crimson pleases 
and invites, but its thorns sometimes repel: 
Very often the choice of young men for boquets. 
Also quite a favorite in dining room, parlor 
and dancing hall. 



Chrysanthemum, (Mae Sullivanae) is a 
large showy flower, growing upon a tall and 
dignified stem. Its cultivation is not easy, so 
they are somewhat rare. For decorations at 
receptions and balls it is quite popular, 
end it disappoi 
srance. 



ints because of its lack of fra- 



C<.,.«'.ti.».t 





The Sweet Pea (Helenesque Vancenelia) 
is a flower of delicate tints growing upon a long- 
graceful stem. It blooms profusely if plucked 
often. Grows up quickly under favorable con- 
ditions, blooms and then is gone. Very fra- 
grant — a pleasant table flower. 



Tulip (Wateri Pointus) 

The Tulip is a hardy plant, which flourish- 
es well both in the house and out-of-doors, 
though it is particularly adapted to the open 
air. It is a very showy flower and is in demand 
by social leaders. The symbol of patience and 
endurance. It is said to have grown at the foot 
of Jacob's Ladder and for this reason is often 
called Jacob's Favorite. 



315 



Chinese Sacred Lily (Olivea Ilodgesa) 
This fragrant flower was brought here from 
China. It suggests the balmy atmosphere of 
the < >rient. Its culture is very easy and any 
time or trouble devoted to it is well repaid by 
the rich return- in blossoms. 

'flu- Begonia, (Mabellum Stoutissimum) 
has a stout, rather thick stalk. Its (lowers are 
tiny and delicate — not showy. It is rather a 
house plant; very sensitive to frosts. Thrives 
well in sunshine and damp soil. Cheers a sick 
in. .in and brightens up a dull day. 

Scarlet Sage i Red-headsia i 

Tin- family of flowers is rather wide-spread 
in the University garden. There are many 
species of this family, such as J. C. Vanceia, 
Elizabetha Quinnta, Helenia Purintonia, Wai- 
ted Wellsus, Wilmera Crawfordia, etc. These 
plants are conspicuous on account of their fiery 
red tops. Very effective when grown in bun- 
ches or grouped for decoration. As a rule they 
are hardy, though some are very delicate and 
have a sweet perfume. 



Blood-root (Adaiea Neali) 

This is small white (lower of the two-lip 
style, having a yellow centre. It is closely allied 
to the Violet, hut has no resemhlance. It is 
very attractive to the passer-by, hut when it is 
plucked a showy effusion gushes forth from 
the stem which at first sometimes mars its 
beauty. Jt makes itself known earlier than its 
sister, the Violet, but the two grow alongside 
one another. It shows up well with the Hya- 
cinth, into the family of wdiich hortoculturists 
i ve confident of placing it. 

Violet (Virginiana Neali) 

The Violet is a modest blue Mower, very 
small but attractive. It is an early Mower grow- 
ing along with the f'dood-root, by which it is 
often supported, and is found often with the 
Crocus. It is one of the most popular Mowers, 
sought both by society and the masses. It is 
very cheerful to have around and is soothing in 
trouble. Cannot stand cold weather long with- 
out becoming affected with a disease called 
Quinsy. Very popular for receptions. 



Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Johnia MacRaetus). 

This is a very hardy Mower that thrives in 
wild soil. Can be found along the Cheat Road. 
It is df modest appearance, but quite winsome 
and satisfying. Appeals to the masses. 



316 




Lawrence Eujene Grqnt 



Marth avcj Oeotye Deghi 



OUR COMING FACULTY 




Puzzle Picture— Who is The Man ? 



■Ty CALENDAR FOR MONTI COLA '10 ft 



September. 

21, 22, 23. Registration. Jack has a new white cap. Grand 
rush on Wednesday. Crystal Courtney meets every 
train. 

24. Fraternities pour forth upon the streets. Forts open. 

25. Literary societies peep from their cocoons. Y..M. C. 

A. and Y. W. C. A. meet new students. 

26. Still no rain, and oh the heat"! All eyes turned to U. 

of P. 6 — o. Oh joy ! Then the thuse begins. 

27. Frats get busy. The last chance for a long breath 

before "pitching in." 

28. Refreshing showers. 

29. Two freshmencaught studying on their way to school. 

30. Emory dares not venture into the law library. "Too 

much learning for the floor." Junior class election. 
October. 

1. Law class election. 

2. Pan-liellenic dance. 

3. \V. V. U. 22, Westminster o. Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 

C. A. reception. 

4. U. U. club tries the road for the first time. Everybody. 

strolls. 

5 Jimtown Budget appears, followed at nightfall by the 
great rush. " Freshmen victorious. 

6. Trial of too jubilant freshmen. 

7. In vain was the admonition of the '09 Monticola. Prof. 

Smith persists in telling the "Oh!" joke. 

8. Dean of Women out of town, girls on their honor: 



9. The Anglo-Saxon lesson assigned. 

10. W. V. U. reserves 6. California Y. M. C. A. o. 

ii. Lean of Women sends Dr. Deahl home promptly at 
10 P. Mi 

12. Prof. Cox delivers his annual lecture on what consti- 
tutes a gentleman. This time it-consists in being able to 
sing and play. 

13. Miss Roberts — Ku-ssen. Dr. Truscott — The vowel is 

short no matter how long the operation. 

14. Dr. Truscott late to class. 

15. Prof. Patterson on time. 

16. Midnight feast in Florence's room. Miss Hedrick 

disturbed. 

17. Florence has a private confab with Miss Moore. W. 

W U. 16 ; Carnegie Tech. o. 

18. Alchemy lays aside his sarcasm and condescend- '.o 

laugli. 

19. Phinny Lakin receives a big fat letter from McKees- 

port. 

20. Miss Moore supplies the little boys with pencils from 
her bountiful store. 

21. Prof. Armstrong cuts class to prepare a lecture. 

22. "Lucitania" leaves town. Floerkev is quite despond- 

ent. 

23. Everybody too. languid to work. Profs, think of giv- 

ing up their jobs. 



317 



24. Penn State 12. W. V. U., o. 

25. LJ. I"-, go in twos. They do not get very far. 

26. Prof. Smith — Now with your Ik most, opinion of Bryan. 

You are not supposed to be a republican in this case. 
You are to be honest. 

27. Prexy vetoes extra holidays. 

28. Bishop buys a mitre. 

29. Two rousing political speeches at Woman's Hall Re- 

publicans hopeful. 

30. Student-- go home to vote — even the "toddling preps." 

31 Caudle-light parade at Woman's Hall. "Gov." Ben- 
nett inspects some of the departments of the Univer- 
sity. 

November. 

1. Three pints of milk missing at the experiment farm. 

Xote. — Miss Rngle and Miss Wilson are fond of 
cream. 

2. The University looks like a girls' boarding school. 

3. Hurrah for Gov. ! 

4. Dr. Truscott wants to know if the girls went home to 

vote. 

5. Saw students reluctantly begin to straggle back. 
o. Great surprise! Dr. Deahl loses his temper. 

7. Hard luck game. U. of P. wins on two flukes. 
X. Team returns. 

9. Littlepage arrives from Charleston after ten days vaca- 

tion. 

10. Clayton expounds the law to Mr. Barnes. It rains 

^ome. 

11. Several juniors make their theatrical debut. The jun- 

ior class celebrates the event by a social hour in the 
gym. 

i-'. The preps who have been cutting literary societies 
interview Prexy. 



13. Friday. A good day for pessimists to say "I told you 

so," for it snowed. 

14. Mighty tough game in the snow but the score was 

W. V. U. 4, Pittsburg Lyceum o. R. O. Hall pets 
religious. 

15. Sigma Nu pledges attend church in a body. Bobbie 

Duncan appears at divine service in a sweater. 

16. Mr. Barnes lectures on the morals of the legal pro- 

fession. 

17. T. N. E. initiates. Squidge Hawley appears in dress 

suit for the first time in his life. 

18. Koelz lays down the law in Board meeting. "Piggie" 

Hogg cuts class. Junior law class makes a noise, 
the Dutch Professor makes a noise, then Prexy makes 
a noise. 

19. Virginia Neal acts as sergeant-at-arms for Dr. Deahl. 

20. Mr. E. A. Bartlett delivers an oration in the stag lunch 

room before a full house, beginning promptly at 12 
P. M. 

21. W. V. U. 47, Bethany, o. 

22. Dr. Lee talks to students at the Presbyterian church. 

23. Allender resigns as business manager of the Athe- 

naeum. The Dido Club formed The Athletic Board 
holds its first meeting. 

24. The T. N. E.'s give a dance. 

25. Grand finish of lessons before holidays. 

26. () thou turkey! Three boxes from home at Woman's 

Hall. 

27. Awfully quiet. Everybody homesick. 

28. Everybody goes to the "Devil." 

29. Rain. Dates for walking canceled. 

30. Woman's Hall threatened with a drouth. $500. Barnes 



318 



flunks six law imps. Airs. Snee entertains Kappa 
Alphas. 

December. 

i. Skinny Haworth visits Morgantown. He is taken into 
the' Dido Club. 

2. Woman's League reception. All the girls out in their 

best. No men present. Freshman Lambdin leaves 
because the faculty will not give him a ''square deal." 

3. Mountaineers initiate. Library furniture should be in- 

sured. 

4. Pi Kappa Alphas initiate. 

5. Armory dance. Dr. Simpson attends in uniform. Hur- 

rah for the cadets ! 

6 Helen's father comes to town. 

7. Like the fabled ostrich Genevieve tries to hide her head 

under a wash-stand. 

8. Mrs. Chez entertains the gym girls. 

Wed. 9. Fortunately for Emma Beall Dr. Becker was in 
the library. 

Thurs. 10 — Marcus O. Bond translates a touching passage 
in French. 

Fri. 11. Lorena backslides in Education. 

Sat. 12. Phi Kappa Psi's receive in their new house. 

Sun. 13. The girls plan Christmas gifts. 

Mon. 14. Editor-in-Chief threatens a thunder-storm. We 
all get busy. 

Tues. 15. Everybody recites well. 

Wed. 16. A day of rest? 

Thurs. 17. Even the heavens frown upon examinations. 



Fri. 18. More examinations. Enough said. 

Sat. 19. Home! ! ! 

January. 

Mon. 4. Quarterly review before the white cap. 

Tues. 5. John Robinson comes to the University for the 
steenth time. This time he enters the Law School. 

Wed. 6. Class meeting. Hurrah. for the Junior Prom and 
1 

Thurs. 7. Grose swipes a potato from the dinner table. 
Two hours later he is caught munching "apples" in 
the library. 

Fri. 8. Pan-Hellenic dance. 

Sat. 9. The engagement of Mr. Bachelor of Arts and Miss 
Co-ed announced. Wedding January twelfth. 

Sun. 10. Students carry out good Xew Year resolutions 
and go to Sunday School. 

Mon. 11. Striking weather. 

Tues. 12. The wedding. We get a bite of the "Ginger 
bread Man" but spit it out before we swallow. 

Wed. 13. The Americal flag floats over the chicken coop. 

Thurs. 14. As usual Simeon turns Rhetoric I over to Prof. 
Patterson. 

Fri. 15. The man looking for the chicken lecturer stops at 
Prof. Holden's room. 

Sat. if") Beowulf Club meets. Fraternity bowling league 
formed. Charley Lively tries to save the Phi Psi 

house from burning. 

Sun. 17. Preachers get busy with the students. 

Mon. 18. Barnes "Gentlemen, yon must know the text." 

Tues. 19. Xew lire escape at Woman's llall. 



319 



Wed. 20. Professor Callahan has new shoes. They speak 
for themselves. 

Thurs. 21. Riot in junior law class. 

Fri. 22. Three junior law students take seats at the 
Prof's desk. 

Sat. 23. Xew initiates into the light fantastic have class in 
the Armory. 

Sun. 24. Students go walking because they can't (?) get 

in church. 

Mon. 2?. Messrs. Gawthrop and Reed attended woman's 
meeting in the Baptist church last night. 

Tues. 26. Junior laws take Blackstone's time for a class 
meeting. 

Wed. 27. Shores heaved a pencil at Mr. Barnes. 

Thurs. 28. Mr. Grose — "Daddy Deahl has angered me on 
two separate occasions. If he does it again dadbob- 
bed! if I don't cut! Dadbobbed if I don't cut anyway. 

Fri. 29. Helen Vance has a dickens of a time. She wont 
forget to post assignments another time. Religious 
mass meeting of students. 

Sat. 30. Every one of Prof. Armstrong's students gets an 
unwelcome post card. Miss Moore gets in at/)i 130. 

Sun 31. "Bitter coldness usurped the throne and gave the 
rule of the cruel winter king," according to an Eng- 
lish student. 

February. 

Mon. 1. No committees can meet to-day. Daisy is out of 
town. 

Tii' - 2. Prof. Patterson gets eggshell in a co-ed's salad 
dressing, ('.round hog day. Piggy Hogg does not 
■ ut. 

Wed, 3. Prof. Deahl gives three free lectures. 



Thurs. 4. Gawthrop and Reed are invited to join the Wom- 
an's League. 

Fri. 5. Y. M. C. A. secretary for W. V. U. arrives. 

5 — 7. Y. M. C. A. Fourth Biennial conference held in 
Morgantown. 

Mon. 8. The sophomores go to Friend's gallery and make 
a bad impression on the camera. 

Tues. 9. Dr. Ogden of Fairmont tells the law students 
something of the early English law. 

Wed. to. Dr. Stathers really scolds his class in French 5. 

Thurs. 11. The law class votes a holidav. The rest of us 



Fri. 12. Holiday! Hurrah! 

Sat. 13. Professor Willey takes ill suddenly. 

Sun. 14. Everybody on good behavior. 

Mon. 15. Dean Hogg (addressing the junior laws) "Gentle- 
men, 1 am crestfallen and humiliated by your un- 
si iphisticated conduct." 

Tues. 16. Daisy goes to bed. Florence takes a suit to the 
cleaner's. 

Wed. 17. Daisy comes out in a newly pressed suit. 

Thurs. 18. Dance, bowling match, and dinner given to the 
visitors under the auspices of the fraternities. 

Fri. 19. Military Ball. 

Sat. 20. The morning after. 

Sun. 21. Everybody (?) goes to church. 

Mon. 22. Holiday in honor of the hero of the hatchet 
Aftermath of the ball given in Phillip's Hall. "Coun- 
ty Fair" in the gymnasium. 

Tues. 23. Gail Hamilton. "Angie" Louchery, and Kemp 
Littlepage take a trip to Fairmont and all put up at 
a hotel over night for $1.00 



320 



Wed. 24. Elsie Kraemer establishes a grocery store in 

Woman's Hall. 
Thurs. 25. Just think ! No one to manage all those law 

students but Miss Heddrick. First initiation of the 

R. J's. Ask Kemp what he has lost. 
Fri. 26. Mr. Friend had an awful time this afternoon. The 

Parthenons had their picture "took." 
Sat. 27. Rodney Stemple fiees from his affinity at early 

dawn. 
Sun. 28. The Education study room is a popular resort. 
March. 
Mon. 1. Dr. Deah'l arrives in town after a week's absence. 

Tues. 2. Dr. Deahl keeps Mabel Stout and Lorena Fries 

after school to make up work. 
Wed. 3. The class in Education 5 takes a trip to the 

lower regions — of the library. 

Thurs. 4. Prof. Finlayson V. D. demonstrates to the French 
class the regularities of the irregular verbs. 

Fri. 5. Why can't people study once in a while? 

Sat. (1. An elegant and formal reception at Woman's Hall. 

Sun. 7. The sun is so bright "they" even begin to talk of 
Cheat. 

Mon. 8. Virginia Neal starts out to meet the world. She 
arrives in Huntington at 4 P. M. 

Tues. 9. Louchery looks for gold in the plastering of Prof. 

Whitehill's recitation room. 
Wed. 10. Allender present at Monticola board meeting. 
Thurs. it. Littlepage not "pre-sent". 
Fri. 12. Littlepage dismissed; "No power under heaven" 

can get him back. 
Sat. 13. Lillian Smith caught flirting with one of the busts 

in the library. 

Sun. 14. Hank, Kisar. Angie, and Bunny play duck-on-a- 
rock. Windy reproves them for their levity. 

Mon. 15. Littlepage reinstated by the all powerful Dean. 
Tues. 16. Harry Griffin looked as cross as two sticks all 
day. We can't find out what is the matter. 



Wed. 17. Dr. Purinton visits Mechanical Hall. Dare you 
to say "Bossie" to Florence. 

Thurs. 18. The junior laws get noisy whereupon Mr. 
Barnes gives the following ultimatum: "Now. gentle- 
men, if you don't quit your cutting up, you will go 
out of here if you have to go out the door." 

Fri. 19. Installation of the new V. M. C. A. cabinet. 

Sat. 20. Hal Scott has been seen walking with six differ- 
ent girls to-day. 

Sun. 21. Dr. King gives the talk of the year for students. 

Mon. 22. Dr. Deahl went for Ada Moon. The poor child 
must have done something but we don't know what. 

Tues. 2^. Few and short were the prayers we said 
But we spoke not a word of sorrow. 
We steadfastly gazed on the face of the horse. 
And bitterly thought of the morrow. 

Wed. 2.]. Another rainy day! Examinations worse than 
ever. 

Thurs. 25. Mr. Barnes puts the Law School on a more 
academic basis. 

Fri. 26. Mae Sullivan goes to W. and J. for the "junior 
prom." Wonder who invited her? 

2~ — 29. Free from Dr. Toil. 

Tues. 30. Dr. Hamilton speaks on "The Federation of the 
World through Peace." 

Wed. 31. The students gaze at the new fence in the li- 
brary. 

April. 

Thurs. 1. Dr. Reese's birthday. He fools lack Hare. 

Fri. 2. Installation of the new Y. M. C. A. cabinet with 
Miss Sew ell, the Y. W. C. A. secretary, present. Preps 
cut the wire so they can not have literary society. 

Sat. 3. Bible students' supper at the Weiland Cafe. 

Sun. 4. Prof. Neil reads the "Love Watch" at the M. E. 

church. 
Mon. 5. The sophomores have an important meeting — 

eating ice cream is the main feature of the evening. 



321 



Tues. 6. Tlie fraternities all clean house and move. 

Wed. 7. Fred Koelz overslept himself this morning, and 
missed his breakfast. Something unusual. 

Thurs. 8. Poor .Mabel Stout got kept in school again 

Fri. 9. Another fuss in the Columbian Literary Society. 
Jimmy wanted to go to see the pictures and Harry 
didn't. 

Sat. to. A terrible explosion! A boiler blew up in Me- 
chanical Hall. The new watchman fainted from 
fright. 
11. Dr. Cochran of Philadelphia talks to students. 
[2. Florence takes a day oft to visit. 
[3. The men in Dr. Deahl's classes can't hear and 
they can't see. And Dr. Deahl does wish the girls 
would wear, "those nice plain little sailor hats again." 
14. Miss Moore warns the girls that it is dangerous 
to go walking in the spring for the grass has blades, 
the flowers have pistils, and the trees shoot. 

Harry Griffin raised a big disturbance in the 



Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues 



Wed. 



Pete Reynolds and 



Fri. 



Sun. 
.Won. 



rs. 15 

library with his lavender socks 
he got two pair for a quarter. 

16. Military inspection. Dr. Simpson performs. First 
game of the season, W. V. U. 6 — Bethany, 4. 

Sat. 17. Capt. Baton visits the Boat-show and flirts with 
the si tubrette. 
[8. Just think! Everybody went walking. 

\<). The R. J's. celebrate Gertrude Robert's birthday. 
The pledges wash the dishes. 

20, Agnes Cady becomes so proficient in French that 
corrects Dr. Slathers. 

Wed 21. Prof. Holden, "Mr. Donley, please tell Mr. Point 
we will begin class when he finishes his pipe. 

Thurs. 22. A study in red at the fraternity dance. The 
Junior I. aw Class throw-, its customary chair down- 
Stairs and almost upset the sauerkraut. 
23. The Parthenons made- their debut in dramatics. 
Florence didn't .yet to say, "1 told you so." Alan 
I )ale comments favorably. 






Sat. 24. The cast have a banquet, Mae — "One of the boys 
said he couldn't get me by phone at all ; he said 1 
was as slippery as an eel." Elsie, yes, you are getting 
so slippery, you are Ely. 

Sun. 25 Pidge Point goes out for breakfast. 

Mon. 26. Phi Kaps and Delts play base ball. 
Tues. 2"]. Bill Cummins studied himself top heavy. The 
team left this morning for the East. 

Wed. 28. Goodrich has a grouch on. Judge went to sleep 
in agency. 

Thurs. 29. Mabel Stout late to dinner; out walking with 
two men ; called into Miss Moore's office. 

Fri. 30. "Under the Greenwood Tree" played by Helena de 
Vance, assisted by Pidgeon Point and Fritz Yon 
Koelz. 

May. 

Sat. 1. May Day, Prom decorations begin. 
Junior Week. 

.Sun. 2. The Juniors attend church in a body. 

Mon. 3. The sun rises bright and early ; so do all Juniors 

Big Sophomore — Freshman game, ends in "a scrap. 

Cup presented to Freshmen by Pres. Mickie with an 

ancespetorious speech. 

Tues. 4. May pole Dance. Monticola celebrates with a 
party. 

Wed. 5. The Great Junior Boat Ride. Lady Bountiful 
opens the ice cream cornucopia. 

Thurs. 6. Intercollegiate track meet with Marietta. Hur- 
rah! for W. V. U. ! 

Fri. 7. W. and J. boys come down for the From and in- 
cidentally "get beat" in a ball game. Wonder why 
Mae met the train. 

Sat. 8. Juniors spent the day in bed. Rooted for the game 
'nit of their up stairs windows. 



322 




Jlodl xxf Artists 

THOS. W. MOORE 
"ENERGY" MAS< >N 
VAN McCREERY 
GEORGE VIEWIG 
JULIA HOPWOOD 
MARGARET HOPWOOD 
PEARL REINER 
ELSIE KRAEMER 
CRYSTAL COURTNEY 
FRED R. KOELZ 
CLARE CLIFFORD 
BLANCHE LAZELLE 
JESSE WEAVER 



UIMMllil IIBMIW 
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Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 



Engravers of Inserts in " Montirola " by appointment 



WORKS--17<h STREET and LEHIGH AVENUE 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




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WELCOME to thi iTUilifl 






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This store takes pleasure in welcoming the Students to 
Morgantown, and extends to each and every one a cordial 
invitation to make THE LEADER headquarters for Station- 
ery while in the city. The numerous things the Students 
need are all here, and if there is anything Special in the Sta- 
tionery line you want, we know where to get it— and what is 
more, we will get it for you, and promptly, too. 

Remember, we are on the ground floor, and so are our 
prices. You are always welcome. 




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fj EDNA RlgHTHHRR /JKt "IP 



MANAGER 



THI LEADER 



rm Two Doors From 
«» Postoffice 






"Pfirschman's 



THE STUDENTS 
HEADQUARTERS. 



THE HOME OF 



Samy Peck Clothes, 

Manhattan Shirts, 

Dunlop Hats, 

Regal Shoes. 



HIRSCHMAN'S 

The Big Store. 



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* " Everything in Stationery, Office Supplies and Good Books." f 



McNeil's Book Store 




W. W. McNEIL, Proprietor 



4 

4 

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83 Walnut Street. 



MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



DERMATOLOGIST. 

SHAMPOOING, ^""^. HAIR DRESSING, 



FACIAL SCALP 

MASSAGE, TREATMENT, 

MANICURING 

WITH ELECTRICITY. 

HAIR GOODS AND TOILET ARTICLES. 

BELL PHONE 340-W. 
PEOPLES PHONE 542-L. 



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Charlottesville Woolen Mills 






] CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA [ 



HIGH-GRADE CADET GRAYS, 
SKY BLUES and DARK BLUES 
--INDIGO DYE-PURE WOOL. 

Free from AH Adulterations and Absolutely Guaranteed. 




$? 






ivA.!/-/^ 



We are the Sole Manufacturers of the Gray Cloth used for Uniforms of the Cadets of the 

U. S. Military Academy at West Point, N. Y. 

Our goods only are used in the Uniforms of the Cadets of the West Virginia University. 



' 



STEUNSvrSHOTGl^S 





r.-.tz ■■■-.±5 -I'-I-i 



DEMI-BLOC SYSTEM. 



Strongest breech mechanism 
known. 

-el and Lug all COM- 
PRESSED and FORGED 
in one piece. 

Brazing of barrels, loop and 
extension rib all in one piece. 

Guns cannot shake loose 
= = Z E _ 5~ ' = CV 

S15.00toS60.00. 

Detailed Information regarding 
these XXth century STEVENS 
productions will be found in our 

Shotgun Catalogue. I 
for it. 

Ask vour Dealer for 
STEVENS DEMI-BLOC 
SYSTEM SHOTGUNS. 



J. STEVENS 

Arms & Tool Co. 

P c 

CHICOPEE FALLS. MASS. 



E5"- = .;-:: ; _= 



Uimerd J%mend 

205-211 THIRD AVENUE. NEW YORK. 
CORNER 18th STREET 




w = 3 = -E = 5 AN" •■> - '._ - - C"_RE=IS O r 

C. iP* Chemicals and Reagents 
Chemicals, {Physical and 

Scientific Jipparatus, 
Jissay Soods. 



TlJe Jfandte the ftest of Everything 7/eeded in 
j£a boratory. 




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t What's The Use? 



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of buying cheap Pictures and Frames 

when 



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PHOTOGRAPHER 



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will make them right for just a little more 

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The Best t Cheapest H 

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BROADWAY cor. TWENTY-SECOND ST. 

MEW YORK. 




SUITS Ready-made and to Measure. 

OVERCOATS in the Newest Styles. 
HATS, English and Domestic. 

SHOES for All Occasions. 
FURNISHINGS, Usual and Unusual. 

LIVERIES, Indoor and Outdoor. 

MOTOR CLOTHING for Owner and Chauffeur. 

RIDING EQUIPMENT. 

ENGLISH LUNCHEON BASKETS. 

TRUNKS. RUGS. 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE ON REQUEST. 



FRATERNITY PINS W. V. U. PINS 

FRATERNITY AND COLLEGE STATIONERY 



We carry an Up-to-Date and Attractive Line of 
College and Fraternity Goods. Memorandum 
Packages of Fraternity Pins Cheerfully fur- 
nished to any Fraternity. 



Qftp j^tu&Mtta' 31? m bra, 



Our Stock of Diamonds, Watches, Clocks and 

Jewelry is Large and Varied. We invite your 

careful inspection of our line. 

FRATERNITY AND COLLEGE PENANTS 
WALL PLACQUES FRATERNAL NOVELTIES 




FOR GENTLEMEN OF 
GOOD TASTE 



SAN FELICE 5cts. 
EL VERSO lOcts. 



ON SALE AT ALL DEALERS. 

THE DEISEL-WEMMER CO.. MAKERS. 
LIMA. OHIO. 



| Jenkins Bros 7 Valves. I 



Jenkins Bros' Valves. 
Jenkins' 1896 Packing.) 



-p [the genuine goods always beah trade mark.] 52. 



1 JENKINS BROTHERS J 



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133-135-137 N. 7TH STREET. 
PHILADELPHIA. 



Boston. 



Chicago. 



!>§ New York. 



London, g 



C. L. BERGER & SONS, 



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37 WILLIAMS 
ST., BOSTON, 

PRECISE ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING 
INSTRUMENTS. 

They secure in their instruments : Ac- ^^ 
curacy of division, Simplicity in manipula-I^V 
tion, Lightness combined with strength, ^"S^ 
Achromatic telescopes, with high power, 
diness of adjustment under varying 
tempi Btiffness to avoid any trem- 

or, even in a strong wind, and thorough 
workmanship in every part. 

e instruments are in general use 

S. Government rs, (Jeolo- 

and Surveyors Their instruments, 

as made for Rivei-, Bridge, Harbor, City, 

Tunnel, Railroad and Mining Engineering, 

II as those made for Triangular or 

Topographical work and Land Surveying, 

are more widely usi d i han i hose of 

ol her firm in the I '. S. 




Illustrated M?nual and Catalogue Sent on Request. 



MINGO CIGAR STORE 



0) Scott Biddle, 
Prop. 



TOBACCO 



ALLGO0D 
CIGARS. 




Morgantown, 
W.Va. 



and PIPES 



MEIAGHRINO 
CIGARETTES. 



1 CHADWICK 'S LAUNDRY I 






S. G. CHADWICK, Proprietor 




170 CHESTNUT STREET 






® 
@ 



Both Phones 



Give Us a Trial 



Vfew u/eiland 
Cafe 



L. C. PANGLE, Proprietor 



deceptions and banquets 
Seven Special Jittentton 



THE FINEST EQUIPMENT OBTAINABLE 

IF YOU DON'T BELIEVE IT, DROP IN 
AND SEE 

Sty* (ttourt 



NEW COURT BUILDING, 

Corner Chestnut Street and Chancery Row. 



BILLIARDS POOL 



BOWLING 



291 



A. H. FETTING 

MANUFACTURER OF 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITY JEWELRY 



i 

213 NORTH LIBERTY STREET, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Memorandum Package sent to any Fraternity Number through the Secretary of the Chapter. 
Special Designs and estimates furnished on Class Pins, Rings, Medals for Athletic Meets, etc. 

i 

'BE'RT KEJSfDALL 

(Successor to Carpenter & Kendall) 

"THE SPOT TO BUY" 

Clothing, Hats and Men's Furnishings. 



uhe Staff 



Hunger 



" At first, she loved him;" 
This is why she ceased— 
He simply WOULDN'T wear his trousers creased. 

We Remedy this Fault at Very 
Reasonable Rates. 

Students' Pressing Shop 



220 WILLEY ST., 



We clean Spots FREE, 
Owned by Students. 



Throw 'em over. ' ' 
Students' Patronage Solicited. 



Electric Massage 
Shaving 



Electric Shampooing 
Hair Cutting 



A. D« Bower 

BARBER SHOP 



Baths 

Cor. Walnnt Slr«'«'< 



Six Chairs 
Court House Square 



Prepare for Commencement 

To do so you must necessarily replace some 
of your toilet accessoraries, which the school 
year has worsted. Let us suggest that you 
visit our store before going elsewhere. 
Why ? Because we pride ourselves on having 
a most complete assortment of the necessaries 
and luxuries in this particular line. Ever- 
thing found in an an Up-to-Date Pharmacy, 

IS here. Prescriptionists to the Populace. 

CASEY'S b PHARMACY 

High Street, Next Door to Postoffice 




LIBRARY 
WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY